Survey Says: DTV Reception better than analog? Say what?
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Survey Says: DTV Reception better than analog? Say what?


This is a discussion on Survey Says: DTV Reception better than analog? Say what? within the DTV | HDTV Chat forums, part of the Over-the-Air (Antenna TV) category.

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  1. #1
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    Survey Says: DTV Reception better than analog? Say what?

    With as much work as I've had to do to get better reception of dtv signals, is this article really true?

    WASHINGTON: Just as the FCC addressed problems with DTV reception, the broadcast lobby fired off flak about the wonders of it. The NAB's latest survey found that 75 percent of households relying entirely on over-the-air television have better reception in digital rather than analog TV.



    Among those households, 47 percent reported a "major improvement" in reception. The poll also found that 54 percent of broadcast-only TV households were receiving more channels since buying a new digital TV set within the past 18 months. Eight percent of respondents said they were receiving fewer channels.
    From - TVB | Survey Says: Digital TV Comes in Better than Analog

    It's hard to believe.

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by Aaron62 View Post
    With as much work as I've had to do to get better reception of dtv signals, is this article really true?



    From - TVB | Survey Says: Digital TV Comes in Better than Analog

    It's hard to believe.
    In the homes I have changed over to DTV it is definitely true. You can have poor analog reception and the DTV reception will be excellent.

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by Aaron62 View Post
    With as much work as I've had to do to get better reception of dtv signals, is this article really true?
    I have no reason to doubt it. Our own OTA reception is fantastically improved. We are much more seriously considering doing away with cable this fall than in previous years. Our reception is now rock solid and free of snow, on all four broadcast networks, where 90% of our fall and spring programming come from.

  4. #4
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    What DTV cheerleaders don't tell you or refuse to admit is that DTV signals ARE HARDER TO RECEIVE than analog signals. The ones who posted above are the fortunate ones who can receive them and do not live on the fringe of a TV stations signal or have inadequate antennas. Those unfortunate folks can pick up a noisy, yet viewable signal with analog , but, cannot do so with DTV because their tv tuner, CECB, etc. will not hold and lock on to the signal. As far as reception being better, the DTV signals do give a better picture quality, but only if you can receive them. If you receive a DTV signal at say 35%, or the same at 95%, the picture quality is the same.

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    Quote Originally Posted by 1inxs View Post
    In the homes I have changed over to DTV it is definitely true. You can have poor analog reception and the DTV reception will be excellent.
    Quote Originally Posted by bicker View Post
    I have no reason to doubt it. Our own OTA reception is fantastically improved. We are much more seriously considering doing away with cable this fall than in previous years. Our reception is now rock solid and free of snow, on all four broadcast networks, where 90% of our fall and spring programming come from.
    Funny, thought I was the only one. PBS on analog would never come through, on digital we're showing 80% on the status bar. Just my $.02 here. Rarely will you see people take the time to compliment something, especially if the Government is involved. I'd guess that 20-25% of the people complaining here haven't even taken the proper steps to connect their antennas correctly and do a auto channel scan (of course this doesn't apply to you Aaron ).

    Quote Originally Posted by allah.ollah View Post
    What DTV cheerleaders don't tell you or refuse to admit is that DTV signals ARE HARDER TO RECEIVE than analog signals. The ones who posted above are the fortunate ones who can receive them and do not live on the fringe of a TV stations signal or have inadequate antennas. Those unfortunate folks can pick up a noisy, yet viewable signal with analog , but, cannot do so with DTV because their tv tuner, CECB, etc. will not hold and lock on to the signal. As far as reception being better, the DTV signals do give a better picture quality, but only if you can receive them. If you receive a DTV signal at say 35%, or the same at 95%, the picture quality is the same.
    It's a tough call to say with confidence whether DTV signals are better or worse than analog. Even if they are worse for some fringe areas, the FCC is working on fixes as we get closer to the transition.

    The FCC late last week released its rules covering "replacement" digital television translator service for full power DTV stations seeking to maintain their analog service areas.

    In its Report and Order, the commission said it recognized that some full power station viewing audiences could be adversely affected by a station's change to digital, due to a reduction in coverage previously provided by analog transmission. The Commission noted that such coverage area deficiencies were unavoidable in some cases due to engineering changes mandated to avoid interference to other stations, and also due to transmitting facility relocation stemming from environmental and/or zoning issues.
    FCC Gives Nod to DTV 'Replacement' Translators

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by allah.ollah View Post
    What DTV cheerleaders don't tell you or refuse to admit is that DTV signals ARE HARDER TO RECEIVE than analog signals.
    89% of stations actually gain viewers with the digital transitions. I know some of you are in that 11%, and I'm sorry for you, but no need to make disparaging remarks about people by calling them names, as you have.
    Last edited by bicker; 05-13-2009 at 02:00 AM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by bicker View Post
    98% of stations actually gain viewers with the digital transitions. I know some of you are in that 2%, and I'm sorry for you, but no need to make disparaging remarks about people by calling them names, as you have.
    Time to get out the pom poms, we're all cheerleaders.

    Give me a D

    Give me a T

    Give me a V

    What's that spell???

    It's probably frustrating for some people who are having to modify or purchase another antenna but the benefits far outweigh the disadvantages. Isn't DTV more power efficient too?

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    The truth is that the pictures are much better (no fuzz or staticy audio) but the downside is that OTA viewing falls flat on its face as easily as Satellite TV reception in the same conditions, even for those in well-received areas (Rain/wind/Snow fade)

    The extra channels and satellite-picture quality of DTV outweighs the costs of analog, i still say it shouldn't be forced upon everyone as it takes away the freedom of choice in favor of all or nothing, borg type philosophy also to those in fringe areas who have zero DTV reception what's going to happen then? go without it or buy satellite?

    Not to mention i'm sure the Government has more than just DTV up their sleeve; after this i'm sure they'll force other ways of life we all must live with, i.e., the apitamy of a dictatorship of sheeple.

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    Here's how I look at it. We're stuck with DTV because analog is about to be dead. So, if it actually does some good for folks in places, that's awesome. It's too bad for the folks who have problems, but it seems to me it was pretty much that way with antenna TV reception anyway. I could have clear reception and my friend ten miles away had yucky reception. I don't think there's a 100% answer here.

  10. #10
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    I noticed that analog reception has always been weak when it comes to DTV ones. And the survey results completely agree with the ones we experience unlike the other surveys where the results would be different from the real experience.

  11. #11
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    To BICKER... I used the word "cheerleader" in a figurative sense and I am sorry you are so sensitive that you took it literally. I apologize. However, my post referred to loss of coverage area, not loss of viewers. It is true that 98% of the stations will gain viewers, but that is within the coverage area of the station due generally to the fact that their analog reception was marginal anyway. They did not bother to watch and now they will. However, those on the fringe or with inadequate antennas will lose all reception, period. Check the FCC before/after coverage maps and you will see DTV coverage contours smaller than analog for the majority of stations. Some have increases in coverage due to TPO, antenna HAAT, frequency, etc. See the Centris study on this done last year. Once again, I never said that I was against DTV transmissions. All I pointed out is all those beautiful pictures and all the bells and whistles that go with it are good only if you have reliable reception and it is a fact that analog is received more reliably, all things being equal. By the way, don't feel "sorry" for me. I am not in that 2% that you speak of. I know how to achieve superior tv reception and I'll match my stacked XG-91, low-noise pre amp. quad shield RG-6 cable, rotor, and 60 ft. tower, not to mention my sensitive tv tuner with anybody's.

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    Quote Originally Posted by htnut View Post
    time to get out the pom poms, we're all cheerleaders.

    Give me a d

    give me a t

    give me a v

    what's that spell???
    .............lol!!!

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by bicker View Post
    98% of stations actually gain viewers with the digital transitions. I know some of you are in that 2%, and I'm sorry for you, but no need to make disparaging remarks about people by calling them names, as you have.
    If you're referring to that FCC report, your numbers are a little off.

    http://hraunfoss.fcc.gov/edocs_publi...C-287579A1.pdf

    The first report found that approximately 89 percent of stations (1,553 stations) will
    experience an overall net gain in the population that can receive their signals. Approximately 11
    percent of stations (196 stations) will have an overall net loss in television viewers. The first
    report includes a separate map showing the predicted coverage areas for every station and shows
    the areas of gain or loss.

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    Quote Originally Posted by allah.ollah View Post
    I know how to achieve superior tv reception and I'll match my stacked XG-91, low-noise pre amp. quad shield RG-6 cable, rotor, and 60 ft. tower, not to mention my sensitive tv tuner with anybody's.
    Now that's what I call an antenna. allah.ollah, What City, State is your antenna setup in?

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by 1inxs View Post
    Now that's what I call an antenna. allah.ollah, What City, State is your antenna setup in?
    How nice to reply to someone who wishes to speak of the engineering and technical aspects of all this and not just someone who wants to watch
    'pretty pictures". I am located 25 miles from the Louisiana coast, about 50 miles SSW of New Orleans. With my rig, I receive every N O station perfectly,digital and analog. I also receive the major network stations from Baton Rouge, about 89 miles away, both analog and digital. I also receive 2 stations from Lafayette, La. which is about 150 miles away. The analogs are about 75% reliable and digitals about 60% due to me being beyond their LOS over the horizon. I forgot to mention on my last post that I also have a hi-gain vhf antenna with a low noise (2.8) preamp going into a Channel Master combiner along with my XG-91 setup. All this is on a 60 foot tower with an extra heavy duty rotor. My biggest accomplishment with all this is my ability to receive network V's and U's from the Gulf Coast (Biloxi, Gulfport, Mobile, Pensacola, etc.) at a distance of 140-180 miles. There are moderate dropouts sometimes but when even mild tropo comes in, reception improves dramatically. All this is possible due to the nature of my flat, open terrain and the salt water corridor, and my setup, of course. My digital signal strength (not picture quality, are you all listening???) on the Gulf Coast channels average about 40% so there are dropouts however, I tolerate this, since this is the nature of the beast at this distance. Since I live in hurricane country all this has to come down when storms come calling. It takes me almost 2 days to remove everything. However, I am proud of what I have and don't mind the work.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Orrymain View Post
    It's too bad for the folks who have problems, but it seems to me it was pretty much that way with antenna TV reception anyway.
    Heck that's the way with everything, in practically all aspects of life.

    Quote Originally Posted by Orrymain View Post
    I don't think there's a 100% answer here.
    Absolutely: Very little, in life, is 100% "good for everyone".

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by allah.ollah View Post
    It is true that 98% of the stations will gain viewers, but that is within the coverage area of the station due generally to the fact that their analog reception was marginal anyway.
    No, it is much more absolute than that: While reception for some folks will become more difficult, the overall impact -- taking everyone into account, not just people on the fringes of reception areas -- taking every one into account, things will be better.

    That's the way of the world: Nothing is ever 100% good for everyone. Getting over 70% of people into the "good" range for something is actually pretty decent.

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by Boo-Ray View Post
    If you're referring to that FCC report, your numbers are a little off.

    http://hraunfoss.fcc.gov/edocs_publi...C-287579A1.pdf
    Yup... my memory was dyslexic. 89%, not 98%.

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    Too bad there isn't a survey for people who were around when TV stations first started broadcasting back in the 40's early 50's and the headaches they faced installing antennas, etc... to receive the signals.

  20. #20
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    Receiving UHF digital signals from 180 miles is an impressive achievement. What is your procedure for locating, verifying, peaking, tweaking and confirming the station? I would imagine it wouldn't take too long after you initially locate, tune and document a location. Do you have a receiver set up and specified for each location or do you position the antenna and rescan each position? Is your tower also used for ham radio? I always wanted to start a thread for pictures of personal towers as well as the broadcast and translator towers. Maybe we should start the thread with pictures of yours.

    Quote Originally Posted by allah.ollah View Post
    Since I live in hurricane country all this has to come down when storms come calling. It takes me almost 2 days to remove everything. However, I am proud of what I have and don't mind the work.
    That was going to be my next question. It seems there are hurdles of nature in every part of the country to deal with. After spending 2 days to remove the equipment, how much time to set up and secure everything again?
    Would lightning and wind be a factor for someone like me in the high mountain desert?

 

 

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