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    hooking up OTA digital to whole house


    This is a discussion on hooking up OTA digital to whole house within the DTV | HDTV Reception and Antenna Discussion forums, part of the Over-the-Air (Antenna TV) category.

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    1. #1
      4johnny
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      I currently have a Comcast coax line coming into my house with TV/internet feeding all my TVs and my cable modem. I want to cancel my Comcast TV subscription and just have Comcast Internet coming in on that line.
      My question is can I split the line(2 to 1) before it enters the house and add a OTA digital antenna to one side of the splitter and still have Comcast on the other side at the same time? I am hoping to have The OTA antenna feed all my TVs like comcast did and only have Comcast coming in for my cable modem.

      Thanks

    2. #2
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      Not likely guy. Incoming broadband usually uses a separate bandwidth from what ota uses. It may not even be separate, but to my knowlege, ota equipment (splitters/combiners, amplifiers, attenuator, etc.) are incompatable with broadband functionality. One is almost certainly going to limit, interfer with, or otherwise thouroughly compromise the other. Just go have a look at what comcast has installed at your home, a splitter for example. Note the specs. Then compare those to a video grade store bought splitter. They almost always differ.

    3. #3
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      If you disconnect the antenna completely from the cable system and have a drop directly from the pole to the cable modem only, you can use the wiring for your OTA.

      Otherwise, you can't mix OTA with cable modem or cable TV service. You used to be able to when cable systems only used lower frequencies but today cable systems are using pretty much everything from 5MHz to 1GHz in some areas.

      Cable modem service is usually carried on empty TV channels, for example our cable modem service is DOCSIS3 and carried on channels 77-81. The return (upload) path is around 31MHz.
      Ryan, N2RJ

      Extra class certified antenna NUT

    4. #4
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      Quote Originally Posted by n2rj View Post
      If you disconnect the antenna completely from the cable system and have a drop directly from the pole to the cable modem only, you can use the wiring for your OTA.

      Otherwise, you can't mix OTA with cable modem or cable TV service. You used to be able to when cable systems only used lower frequencies but today cable systems are using pretty much everything from 5MHz to 1GHz in some areas.

      Cable modem service is usually carried on empty TV channels, for example our cable modem service is DOCSIS3 and carried on channels 77-81. The return (upload) path is around 31MHz.
      I wonder if it would be cheaper for the original poster to just use the coax system for antenna and have Comcast come back out and add a single line for the cable modem again.
      Fringe Reception likes this.

    5. #5
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      I usually deal with this situation by disconnecting the cable into the house and connecting it directly to the modem, and then installing the antenna to the existing house house cable at the splitter. Most people use wireless these days, so you don't have to run much cat5, if any.

      It's usually easier to run a new antenna to the splitter than to re-cable the inside of the house!

    6. #6
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      Quote Originally Posted by Aaron62 View Post
      I wonder if it would be cheaper for the original poster to just use the coax system for antenna and have Comcast come back out and add a single line for the cable modem again.
      That works.
      Ryan, N2RJ

      Extra class certified antenna NUT

    7. #7
      DTVUSA Jr. Member
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      Great, idea! When they built my house they ran a separate feed all the way from each cable connection to the main cable box on the outside. So I'm hoping I can selectively connect up just the TVs I'm using to the antenna. I do wish I had two cables run to the main TV box, because I would like to run CAT5 cable to internet feed for my Netflix. I have had some shows disconnect when using my wireless. I might try to run another coax to my main TV so the cable modem can be at that location.

      Bryce

     

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