Is Blu-ray REALLY better than DVD?

Is Blu-ray REALLY better than DVD?


This is a discussion on Is Blu-ray REALLY better than DVD? within the DVD Players | DVD Recorders forums, part of the Home Theater category.

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  1. #1
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    Is Blu-ray REALLY better than DVD?

    Although we have Hi-Def TVs in our home, we don't (as yet) have any Blu-ray players; we have DVD players and a small batch of DVDs but no big collection of them. Everything we have seems to be in good shape and the players perform well with our TVs, and given the economic downturn, we have no immediate plans to buy a Blu-ray player or the discs.

    Nevertheless, I am wondering: is the Blu-ray format really better than DVD? I have heard lots of people saying it is but I rarely get any really good explanations or comparisons.

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by leighdu View Post
    Is Blu-ray REALLY better than DVD?
    Pardon me for shouting:

    Yes.



    Quote Originally Posted by leighdu View Post
    Nevertheless, I am wondering: is the Blu-ray format really better than DVD? I have heard lots of people saying it is but I rarely get any really good explanations or comparisons.
    Let me be fair about this: DVD is really good. The difference between analog broadcast and DVD is substantial, and actually is greater than the difference between DVD and Blu-ray. But that's really a credit to just how much better DVD is than analog broadcast -- it doesn't really take anything away from Blu-ray.

    The advantage of Blu-ray over DVD is very significant, if the program was made to exploit that advantage. So, for example, I wouldn't bother with Blu-ray for, say, The Simpsons, but for a program where picture quality was a significant concern in the crafting of the program, you will definitely note a significant improvement going from DVD to Blu-ray.

    Do keep in mind that Blu-ray delivers effectively double the bitrate of HD television (broadcast or cable). So if you think all you get from Blu-ray is HD (like the HD channels you get) on disc, that's not the case -- Blu-ray is even better than that.


    Something else to keep in mind in this regard: While Blu-ray does support more advanced audio technologies, DVD did support DD5.1, which is the best most of us can handle in our home theaters anyway. So while there is significant advantage in video quality that can be derived from Blu-ray, don't expect a big step-up in the quality of the audio... again, this is a credit to how good DVD was, and doesn't take anything away from Blu-ray.

    Blu-ray is still significantly more expensive than DVD. However, for some things, I think it is worth it. We have purchased the Blu-ray version of Planet Earth, and of the Harry Potter films. We probably won't buy many BDs (but we didn't buy many DVDs either), but rather instead add BD access onto our Netflix subscription next summer, and exploit our new device that way. It's a few extra dollars a month and at that rate well worth it.
    Last edited by bicker; 08-09-2009 at 09:06 AM.

  3. #3
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    So what would all the extra storage be for? That reminds me of floppy disks vs. cds. A floppy was too small to hold even one low res picture, but putting one high res picture on a cd seems like a waste.

  4. #4
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    Blu-ray is used to store high definition video.

  5. #5
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    blu ray

    We have a very good Sony 1080 set and was given a blu-ray player last year. We already had a Sony DVD player-recorder. The blu-ray does seem to be sharper than what we record from satellite on the player-recorder but not by much. I think this small difference may be attributed to the TV being HD. The problem with the blu-ray is the cost of the discs for it. Even rental is substantially higher than regular DVD. We do not see the benefit of paying the higher cost at this time. The DVD rentals and our own recording of some programs does not appear to be so much less quality as to warrant the price difference for blu-ray discs

  6. #6
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    I have both formats, and though I can't go into the nitty-gritty of how or why Blu-ray discs (BDs) are better than DVDs, I will say BDs beat the older format in most aspects, especially in sound, picture quality and storage capacity.

    Consider, I have a BD of Close Encounters of the Third Kind which has all three versions of Spielberg's UFO classic in one BD. The DVD version i have has only the Director's Edition. And no more double sided DVDs either. I have several of those and I find them tough to handle.
    Want more info on movies and electronics? Check out my page at Viewpoints!

  7. #7
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    Thread Starter

    Thanks for all the replies guys (especially Bicker, that was an awesome explanation). We do have a blue-ray player now and I can definitely see the difference. Sorry for the long wait on response..I had totally forgotten I had asked this!

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by heather View Post
    So what would all the extra storage be for? That reminds me of floppy disks vs. cds. A floppy was too small to hold even one low res picture, but putting one high res picture on a cd seems like a waste.

    another way to put it is that one frame of video similar to one pic can be allowed to store more data and the data the crisper more precise looking the pic or frame will be

 

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