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  1. #1
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    Default Philips MANT940 Indoor/Outdoor HDTV Antenna Reviews

    About: Philips MANT940: Flat UHF panel array for analog and digital HDTV UHF reception. Comes with low-noise, optimum gain amplifier (weather resistant and paintable).

    FeaturesConnectors F-Type - Manufacturer Philips Electronics - Manufacturer Part Number MANT940 -Standard Warranty Lifetime Limited - Manufacturer Website Address Home - Royal Philips - Product Name MANT940 Indoor/Outdoor HDTV Antenna - Gain 18 dB - Product Type HDTV Antenna

    Tech Specs - Standard Warranty Lifetime Limited - Package Contents MANT940 Indoor/Outdoor HDTV Antenna
    Complete mounting kit
    AC Power Adapter
    - Connectors F-Type - Manufacturer Philips Electronics - Additional Information Cable Type: Coaxial

    Antenna Features:
    UHF flat panel array
    Paintable housing
    Optimized for HDTV
    -Manufacturer Part Number MANT940

    -Manufacturer Website Address Home - Royal Philips - Compatibility
    -Brand Name Philips - Gain 18 dB - Product Model MANT940 - Product

    - Name MANT940 Indoor/Outdoor HDTV Antenna - Product Type HDTV Antenna

    Cable Length 20 ft

    Aproximate Pricing: $34.00 - $55.00

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    - DTV | HDTV Reception and Antenna Discussion
  2. #2
    Contributor staticMHZ's Avatar
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    my walmart has these, range is 20 miles, I'm 28 miles from the transmitters, so I'm thinking it *may* work with the amplifier. I might get one and put it on the 3rd floor balcony with the mount included. Would this antenna need to be grounded with a block and a rod?

  3. #3
    Contributor Aaron62's Avatar
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    It would be mounted outside on your balcony?

  4. #4

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    if it is amplified yes ground it to a building ground

  5. #5
    Contributor staticMHZ's Avatar
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    yeah these come with a mounting kit and a U-bolt. You don't even need to use a mast. You can bolt it down to a block of wood or a pipe

  6. #6
    Super Moderator Piggie's Avatar
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    About: Philips MANT940: Flat UHF panel array for analog and digital HDTV UHF reception. Comes with low-noise, optimum gain amplifier (weather resistant and paintable).


    A few people in the Gainesville DMA have tried these and they work about 20 miles, not enough metal in the sky, and rely on the amp. They also are bad on mulitpath if you have any.

  7. #7

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    I have tried all the Philips Antennas and ended up returning them. Also the indoor RCA amplified. Now I use the indoor Radio Shack "flying saucer" and it is the best of the bunch, IMHO.

  8. #8

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    Hey Cowboy 4 Christ,
    I read some of your posts and wrote down your recommendations for DTV converter boxes but unfortunately I cannot find the list. Would you bounce back the one's you recommend? Also, I have the Phillips Antenna but just read it's only good for up to 28 miles from a transmitter. How do I know where the closest transmitter is?

    Thanks in advance for your help!

    All4Him1958

  9. #9
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    Someone needs to go to a RV scrapyard and scavenge all the Winegard Sensars they can find. those so far have been the best antennas for long distance reception (if you amp it up enough)

  10. #10

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    Quote Originally Posted by ercjncpr View Post
    ... I use the indoor Radio Shack "flying saucer" and it is the best of the bunch, IMHO.
    Most indoor amped antennas are junk. The RS "UFO" antenna is one of the better ones and sometimes actually works fairly well (depending on building materials surrounding the indoor antenna and distance from the towers).

    Quote Originally Posted by all4him1958 View Post
    ... I have the Phillips Antenna but just read it's only good for up to 28 miles from a transmitter. How do I know where the closest transmitter is?
    "28 miles" is a rough ballpark estimate (usually overly optimistic) of how far the antenna may work from the stations' towers. Reception can vary widely, depending on local elevation, terrain, weather and other factors.

    To find out how far away all your stations are and in what direction, enter your address here.

    Rule of thumb: The best antennas typically don't have much visible plastic on them and look like conventional metal antennas. It takes metal to receive OTA TV.

  11. #11

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    I saw one of these mounted on the side of a house the other day. Couldn't identify it until I drove closer. Kind of reminded me more of a satellite panel for internet. Makes me wonder just how well it actually works for receiving VHF signals.

  12. #12

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    I'm testing one of these now. Must be clear that this is a directional UHF antenna, so one shouldn't expect any benefit for VHF reception. That stated, I live 30 miles north of Chicago, where all but one of the stations broadcast in the UHF band and all transmission towers are in the same place (downtown, on top of Sears and John Hancock buildings). I've set this up on the balcony of my apartment and point it toward the downtown area - which means that I have to pass through the length of my rather large apartment building.

    For my particular situation, the antenna is working surprisingly well. I can pull in all of the UHF DTV channels with a decent signal. Only issues I have are with WGN (which at 19 is the lowest broadcaster on the UHF band), which frequntly pixelates/stutters. The CBS affiliate WBBM is broadcasting on VHF 12, and I get no signal. They will switch back to UHF 26 in a few months and I expect that at that point all will be good.

    In short, I think that this is a good antenna for the Chicago market and likely any other where directional UHF is needed. I would like to bump the gain on the preamp though, as I'd guess this would solve my problem with WGN. Any advice from the group on cheap (variable gain?) preamps would be appreciated.
    Last edited by chitownguy; 12-09-2009 at 12:04 PM.

  13. #13
    Contributor Aaron62's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by chitownguy View Post
    I'm testing one of these now. Must be clear that this is a directional UHF antenna, so one shouldn't expect any benefit for VHF reception. That stated, I live 30 miles north of Chicago, where all but one of the stations broadcast in the UHF band and all transmission towers are in the same place (downtown, on top of Sears and John Hancock buildings). I've set this up on the balcony of my apartment and point it toward the downtown area - which means that I have to pass through the length of my rather large apartment building.

    For my particular situation, the antenna is working surprisingly well. I can pull in all of the UHF DTV channels with a decent signal. Only issues I have are with WGN (which at 19 is the lowest broadcaster on the UHF band), which frequntly pixelates/stutters. The CBS affiliate WBBM is broadcasting on VHF 12, and I get no signal. They will switch back to UHF 26 in a few months and I expect that at that point all will be good.

    In short, I think that this is a good antenna for the Chicago market and likely any other where directional UHF is needed. I would like to bump the gain on the preamp though, as I'd guess this would solve my problem with WGN. Any advice from the group on cheap (variable gain?) preamps would be appreciated.
    I thought the MANT940 came with a preamp? Actually, I'm bumping this for the antenna brainiacs here.

  14. #14
    Super Moderator Piggie's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Aaron62 View Post
    I thought the MANT940 came with a preamp? Actually, I'm bumping this for the antenna brainiacs here.
    It has an amp. It's one of those antennas that will work in the right situations. It's not high on my recommendations list for one reason.

    It's meant for people that need a little more than rabbit ears and a loop. But it's not a fringe or deep fringe antenna.

    Now given the scenario in which it can work means the signals are fairly strong outside but not good enough for rabbit ears indoors. This means it's likely hood of someone buying one that the amp overloads is pretty high.
    The more I understand, the less I know.

    PORK... The Other White Meat....

  15. #15
    DTVUSA Member Don_M's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Piggie View Post
    Now given the scenario in which it can work means the signals are fairly strong outside but not good enough for rabbit ears indoors. This means it's likely hood of someone buying one that the amp overloads is pretty high.
    Uh-huh. I don't know how many times I've offered advice to someone seeking antenna help because they bought this thing. It behaves a lot like the Terk TV55 "stick" antenna in that there always seems to be one station that the writer can't seem to get, no matter where he/she places the antenna. My money was on overload every single time.

    Also note that there's no reason to pick on RCA for this antenna, as they've only slapped their nameplate on a product that's made by a Chinese contract manufacturer:

    Radio Shack has sold the same thing for years.

    • Home Depot carries them as a General Electric antenna.

  16. #16
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    The Philips MANT 940 is the best of the bunch. Although I like the mounting system on teh Radio Shack version. The GE version and its mount are OK. Monoprice has a version that is OK. And Ive seen another one on eBay, the HD650 that looks like it might be right up there with the Radio Shack with a high quality versatile mounting solution.

    The Philips MANT940 when mounted horizontally offers almost as good a VHF High performance as the HD1080 from Winegard. Maybe not quite....more like the DB2 with an amp. Which is to say -14 dB on Ch. 7 to -6 dB on Ch. 13 or there abouts. Or not very good.

    An amped Channel Master 4221HD is a better VHF High band performer.

    The horizontal MANT940
    Radio Shack DA 5200
    eBay HD 650

    are my picks for tops of that style antenna.

    Then maybe the Monoprice.
    and lastly the GE.

    But performance is roughly the same. Which is to say, pretty good on UHF, not as good as Rabbit Ears on VHF. However you can gain advatage of sweet spot location outdoors with these over Rabbit Ears which can make a difference. They are very small so can be located almost anywhere. They definitely have a useful place in the repetoire.

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