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  1. #1

    Default Antenna Selection Reno NV

    Greetings,
    I feel horribly guilty asking for advice as my first post here but it seems like a friendly place with a great deal of good info so hopefully me just being an info grubber will be ok
    here is my tv fool info:
    TV Fool

    Previously I had a small tv top amplified antenna and got about the same channels as I do with an old roof top antenna about 5ft by 3ft with antiquated wiring that is decentrigating and broken upper pieces. we currently get 2.1, 2.2, 4.1, 4.2, 5.1, 5.2, 5.3, 8.1, 8.2, 11.1, 11.2, 21.1 and 21.2.

    We currently have two tv's but will eventually have 4 so any info on signal strength to multiple tv's would be great as well.
    thanks in advance!
    IrishChamp

    PS. Solid Signal seems to be in high regard however if there is somewhere closer to NV that is reputable that would be fantastic for shipping reasons.
    Last edited by IrishChamp; 05-08-2011 at 04:10 PM.

  2. #2
    DTVUSA Member Tim58hsv's Avatar
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    You'll need either a rotor or an antenna that picks up signals from opposite direction like a G1483, new rg6 coax and mount the antenna outdoors. The G1483 is available only from Summit Source which is located in Indiana but they do ship fast. Might take a week to get to you.

  3. #3
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    thanks,
    I definitely don't want the complication of a rotor, I'd much rather go with multiple antennas or a unidirectional antenna, it seems that multiple antennas perform best which is a plus in that direction.
    Quote Originally Posted by Tim58hsv View Post
    You'll need either a rotor or an antenna that picks up signals from opposite direction like a G1483, new rg6 coax and mount the antenna outdoors. The G1483 is available only from Summit Source which is located in Indiana but they do ship fast. Might take a week to get to you.

  4. #4
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    Reno has a lot of... shall we say... duplication. It turns out that every network signal in the market except for PBS is available from Slide Mountain where KRNV and whatnot come from. But even that's not the whole story, because there's a nearly full set coming from the Verdi area as well, with every network except CW available from there. (K51DJ-D repeats KRNV, for example.)

    I would be very surprised if you couldn't find a single antenna position that got you at least one copy each of:

    2-1 KTVN (CBS)
    4-1 KRNV (NBC)
    5-1 KNPB (PBS)
    8-1 KOLO (ABC)
    11-1 KRXI (FOX)
    14-1 KNRC-LD (Ind)
    21-1 KAME (MyN)
    27-1 KREN (CW/Univision)

    KRXI and KREN are both 1000 kW UHF signals coming from opposite directions, so I suspect you could probably get away with aiming a small VHF antenna at Slide Mountain for 2/4/8 and a small UHF north for 5/11/14/21 which would grab 27 off the back side. Or, perhaps that small UHF antenna aimed north could get you 2/4/8 from Verdi instead, cut out the VHF entirely.

    You have a lot of options.

    - Trip
    Last edited by Trip; 05-08-2011 at 08:25 PM.
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    Comments are my own and not that of the FCC (my employer) or anyone else.

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  5. #5
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    thanks very much for the info!
    do you have any specific suggestions on antennas?
    what you your suggestion be for allowing enough signal strength for 4 tv's in a large single story house?

    Quote Originally Posted by Trip View Post
    Reno has a lot of... shall we say... duplication. It turns out that every network signal in the market except for PBS is available from Slide Mountain where KRNV and whatnot come from. But even that's not the whole story, because there's a nearly full set coming from the Verdi area as well, with every network except CW available from there. (K51DJ-D repeats KRNV, for example.)

    I would be very surprised if you couldn't find a single antenna position that got you at least one copy each of:

    2-1 KTVN (CBS)
    4-1 KRNV (NBC)
    5-1 KNPB (PBS)
    8-1 KOLO (ABC)
    11-1 KRXI (FOX)
    14-1 KNRC-LD (Ind)
    21-1 KAME (MyN)
    27-1 KREN (CW/Univision)

    KRXI and KREN are both 1000 kW UHF signals coming from opposite directions, so I suspect you could probably get away with aiming a small VHF antenna at Slide Mountain for 2/4/8 and a small UHF north for 5/11/14/21 which would grab 27 off the back side. Or, perhaps that small UHF antenna aimed north could get you 2/4/8 from Verdi instead, cut out the VHF entirely.

    You have a lot of options.

    - Trip

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    Moderator dkreichen1968's Avatar
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    The most compact high VHF antenna out there is the Antennas Direct C5. So if you went with Trips first suggestion a C5 pointed south, and a C2, or DB4, or an AntennaCraft U4000 pointed north. I'd think that would give you enough signal for 4 TVs depending on cable length. For other high VHF antennas the AntennaCraft Y5-7-13 is less expensive, but considerably larger and less aesthetically pleasing. You would connect the two antennas using a UVSJ (UHF/VHF/Splitter/Joiner). You want to make sure that all your cabling is high quality black RG6.
    Last edited by dkreichen1968; 05-09-2011 at 06:49 AM.

  7. #7
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    thanks!
    Quote Originally Posted by dkreichen1968 View Post
    The most compact high VHF antenna out there is the Antennas Direct C5. So if you went with Trips first suggestion a C5 pointed south, and a C2, or DB4, or an AntennaCraft U4000 pointed north. I'd think that would give you enough signal for 4 TVs depending on cable length. For other high VHF antennas the AntennaCraft Y5-7-13 is less expensive, but considerably larger and less aesthetically pleasing. You would connect the two antennas using a UVSJ (UHF/VHF/Splitter/Joiner). You want to make sure that all your cabling is high quality black RG6.

  8. #8
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    I think you should start out with a small UHF antenna of some kind, like a DB4 or C2 as Dan suggests, and see how that works. Only add the VHF antenna if you find that you need it. I think you should be able to get the CBS/NBC/ABC signals from the translators, thus saving you a lot of trouble.

    As for distributing, I say to wait and see. If you find when you set up the four TVs that the signals fall off too much, just add a distribution amplifier. If not, leave it passive.

    - Trip
    Last edited by Trip; 05-09-2011 at 09:34 AM.
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  9. #9
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    I'd agree with Trip. Start with something attached to ONE TV, and go from there. A CM 2016 could be a good starting point.

    I would recommend EV's Kosmik Super Quad, but you'd have to build it yourself. I use them all the time here, I can give you to instructions.

    You may find this of use: 8-Bay Antenna Shootout at VHF

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    IrishChamp,

    Trip is correct about your having several duplicated channels in your area but I have to go with Tim's recommendation using an antenna rotor, allowing you to receive the 'most' channels rather than only specific channels. Here's why.

    Last winter, the Seattle area had an unusual (real) snowfall and the CBS source I usually use went dark (lost its electrical power) for over a full week. Unlike others, I didn't lose my CBS reception because I am able to receive a different transmitter that also carries CBS. Sometimes duplication has its benefits.

    Jim

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    Moderator dkreichen1968's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jim In Seattle View Post
    IrishChamp,

    Trip is correct about your having several duplicated channels in your area but I have to go with Tim's recommendation using an antenna rotor, allowing you to receive the 'most' channels rather than only specific channels. Here's why.

    Last winter, the Seattle area had an unusual (real) snowfall and the CBS source I usually use went dark (lost its electrical power) for over a full week. Unlike others, I didn't lose my CBS reception because I am able to receive a different transmitter that also carries CBS. Sometimes duplication has its benefits.

    Jim
    On the other hand, some of us like our reception to be as close to having cable as possible. Especially if we have a DVR or multiple TVs. A rotor would be great for when you lose service from one location, but I'd rather have all my signals all the time on one cable, which is why I'd love to see the return of the JOIN-TENNA or something better.

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    IrishChamp,

    I forgot to mention I split my received signals 4 ways around my home without using antenna pre-amplifiers or a distribution amplifier. As mentioned above, start your project working without any splitters and a single TV set.

    Although it might seem counterintuative, you may have better results by trying different antenna heights above ground which means raising OR lowering your antenna by 6 or 12 inches: that may be where the 'sweet-spot' for the best reception is hiding. Please keep us posted and good luck!

    Jim
    Last edited by Fringe Reception; 05-09-2011 at 06:56 PM.

  13. #13
    Moderator of DTV Latino scandiskwindows9x's Avatar
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    was reading the post and have a question, if there is a area with mountains and hills would not be better try of caught the signal without multipath or atleast try of pick up the channels locating the antenna in a programmed area where the signals of the channels in 2edge-1 edge can bounce , like taking some advantage of the multipath reflection?

    just a question, supposed that the radioelectrical signals travels at same speed than lights beams so would be a good idea have a high gain antenna or an reflector based one and pointing to the area programmed where the signals would converge.

    hope not be a stupid reasoning or though

    best regards
    Francisco

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