22% of households dissatisfied with their pay-TV provider

dkreichen1968

Moderator
Staff member
#1
Michelle Clancy ©RapidTVNews | 01-02-2012

More evidence of cord-cutting has surfaced. According to a new survey, 22% of pay-TV subscribers in the United States are planning to radically change their pay-TV services within the quarter.

Centris, in the course of surveying 7,000 U.S. households once per month, has found that 3% of them will cancel their pay-TV services in the next three months completely, 11% will downsize their existing subscriptions and 8% plan to switch providers.

The further evidence suggests a deep lack of customer satisfaction with current providers, as well as the impact of the availability of cheaper options in the market. A full 36% of switchers and cutters said the performance of their current provider was the issue; 37% said their monthly bills are too steep. Limited channel selection came in at 21%. The attractiveness of over-the-top (OTT) alternatives was only a deciding factor for 10% of respondents, but Centris still issued a warning to traditional operators.

"It is Centris’ view that defending market share will become increasingly difficult for pay-TV providers with increased levels of competition and new OTT viewing options," said researchers. "Enhanced pricing and bundling strategies, as well as effective use of elasticity programs, will need to be deployed to successfully compete."
Read More: 22% of households dissatisfied with their pay-TV provider | News | Rapid TV News
 

TVTom51

DTVUSA Member
#3
"performance of their current provider" is certainly the issue in my case for my internet connection. I've never really had problems with my cable providers TV service other than it being expensive.
 

Orrymain

, Blogger: Orry's Orations
#4
I feel lucky that I don't have performance issues, but I am very unhappy with channel selection and have been ever since Comcast returned here. They had us, sold us, and then bought us back, and when they got us back, their focus has been on everything else but channel selection. Of course, pricing is upsetting too because it's way too high.
 

Chips

DTVUSA Member
#5
My customers for my work are Auto Dealerships and over the past year some of them have upgraded the TV's in the customer waiting areas. Of course most dealerships have cable TV, so you I often see large flat screen TV's on analog cable with the picture stretch and they look terrible. However yesterday while at one of my customers in Rochester, NY, I saw they had upgraded the TV to about a 50 inch Sharp and of course as usually, I look at it with a stretch picture and was critical, until I realize I was looking at a subchannel, sure enough, it was hook to an antenna. Later I tune around to the different channels, it got all the Rochester stations, including the analog ones. It was awesome to see n large screen HD TV, that actual had an HD picture, at an auto dealer. Their old TV was hook to cable, so somebody made a decision to go to antenna and it was nice to see a good picture for a change.
 

MrPogi

Moderator, , Webmaster of Cache Free TV
Staff member
#6
I don't know why businesses use cable. All they need is something to entertain customers for an hour or less... An antenna would be fine for most businesses. And they'd save a bundle.

I've considered doing a few "freebie" antenna installs at businesses around town, in return for putting a sign on the wall next to the HDTV advertising "Free HDTV". Maybe this spring.
 

dkreichen1968

Moderator
Staff member
#7
I don't know why businesses use cable. All they need is something to entertain customers for an hour or less... An antenna would be fine for most businesses. And they'd save a bundle.

I've considered doing a few "freebie" antenna installs at businesses around town, in return for putting a sign on the wall next to the HDTV advertising "Free HDTV". Maybe this spring.
If I were to start an antenna install business, I'd certainly start with commercial business. Especially doctor offices, mechanics, tire stores, and fast food resturants. They have to pay the commercial price, but they don't need ESPN or even any of the news channels. They can save a lot of money quick. The idea of doing some freebies in exchange for advertising is a great idea. You save them a lot of money and get great exposure. It's a page out of the Antennas Direct play book.
 
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Chips

DTVUSA Member
#8
I don't know why businesses use cable. All they need is something to entertain customers for an hour or less... An antenna would be fine for most businesses. And they'd save a bundle.

I've considered doing a few "freebie" antenna installs at businesses around town, in return for putting a sign on the wall next to the HDTV advertising "Free HDTV". Maybe this spring.
With many auto dealerships, like the one I mention, they needed to migrate to the Internet and Cable was often the only option, with the Internet came cable TV. The dealer I mention years ago had an antenna hook to the TV, then came Time Warner Roadrunner and Cable TV, now they are back to the antenna, which I think is cool.
 

Fringe Reception

Super Moderator, Chief Content Editor
Staff member
#9
Last summer I was astonished to see three Motels on Highway 99 in North Seattle with new antenna installations on their roofs. All three are using old-style CM-4221s. I'd like to know who is installing them and where they are finding the old CM antennas.

Jim
 

Orrymain

, Blogger: Orry's Orations
#10
I agree. I sometimes wonder if it's a generational thing. Young people today don't even know there is such a thing as antenna, not when they are raised with cable. It's like phones -- some only know cell phones. Depending upon the age of the owner of a business, the very thought of antenna may not even exist.
 
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