A Case for Ending Federal Support to Public Radio and Public TV

MrPogi

Moderator, , Webmaster of Cache Free TV
Staff member
#2
I'd hate to lose PBS. NPR, not so much, but still, I do tune in now and then. I think there could be less NPR stations and we could still have decent coverage, and streaming is available to fill most of the gaps.

I think PBS has been the most effective user of multicasting of any network, period. And the quality of the shows is usually pretty good, too. But some of the programming could be spun off to for-profit networks, and a lot of good older shows could be syndicated. And I totally agree about re-transmission revenues. Pay TV re-sells a free product. They count PBS stations as part of their umpteen hundred channels count, and should shoulder some of the costs, too.
 
#3
Since I cut my cable cord over 2 years ago I now donate $52/year (a dollar a week) through a membership to the local PBS station WGBY 57. They provide 4 channels and great PBS programming on a shoe string budget, I know every dime they receive goes to good use.....no corporate jets and boondoggle for the executives like TWC, Comcast etc.

Also the PBS donation is tax deductible. I feel they deserve a helping hand....now if everyone gave them $1/week that would make a huge difference.


Cheers,
Cutthecable
TVictory - Your Cable Freedom Experts - Home Page
 
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n2rj

Moderator
Staff member
#4
I would support funding PBS for non-opinion programming. Let opinion programming go on commercial TV.

In other words, leave the science shows, arts shows and kids shows. Cut everything else.
 

Fringe Reception

Super Moderator, Chief Content Editor
Staff member
#5
We watched some PBS programs yesterday including Classics Roadshow and one sponsor was Hyundai. If the programs are done well and they hold a market share, corporate sponsors will support them. Sesame Street is a gazillion dollar business alone. Perhaps the relationship between The Corporation for Public Broadcasting and PBS should be reviewed. I don't think losing 14% funding by taxpayers is going to put them out of business any time soon.

Jim
 

dave73

DTVUSA Member
#6
We watched some PBS programs yesterday including Classics Roadshow and one sponsor was Hyundai. If the programs are done well and they hold a market share, corporate sponsors will support them. Sesame Street is a gazillion dollar business alone. Perhaps the relationship between The Corporation for Public Broadcasting and PBS should be reviewed. I don't think losing 14% funding by taxpayers is going to put them out of business any time soon.

Jim
Removing the funding might not put PBS out of business, but it will force smaller operated PBS stations off the air. This was talked about in the 1990's, & for my local PBS station, WYIN out of Merrillville Indiana (licensed to Gary, Indiana), any cuts would result in a reduction of programming hours & all local programming would have to be eliminated. This station spends a lot of money to produce a local news program catering to NW INdiana (nowhere near as good as the Chicago stations, but Chicago stations cater little news to Indiana), have a forum program talking about issues in the Calumet Region (as that's called, along with other nicknames), carry high school & some college sports, & a few other programs. WYIN spends more money creating local programming than WYCC & WTTW combined.

Also, if the governement wants to eliminate the CPB funding, then they need to have the FCC change the allocation for the PBS & independent stations with non-commercial licenses to commercial, so that they can be self supporting (they could still take donations if they want). Taking away the funding, but keep the current rules in place for non-commercial licensed stations could force many PBS stations to have longer beg-a-thons (if not every night or weekend). WYIN already holds begathons after 12:30am every night just to stay on the air, or they'd sign off at night (they hold some during the daytime too). They were the last Chicago area station to stay on the air 24 hours a day in 2008 (part of the reason before 2009 was because of the transition to digital).
 

dkreichen1968

Moderator
Staff member
#7
If the FCC changes their status from non-comercial to comercial then the FCC will start charging them license fees, which isn't the case now. Those can be, depending on the market, close to 6 figures. In theory you can be non-profit and still have advertisers/sponsers, which PBS already has. They may just need to push that a lot more.
 

MrPogi

Moderator, , Webmaster of Cache Free TV
Staff member
#8
"Why save PBS? PBS would cost $1.03 per person in 2011 to operate. In juxtaposition, the U.S. Defense Budget and overseas contingency operations will cost the average taxpayer $2,983.17 in 2011."

I have a family of 5. I would gladly give them $5.15 a year. Perhaps a checkbox on my tax return would be good? Utah has checkboxes on their forms for lots of stupid things I will not give for. But this? Sure.

This way, it gets tax dollars ONLY from those who want to support it.
 

n2rj

Moderator
Staff member
#9
If the FCC changes their status from non-comercial to comercial then the FCC will start charging them license fees, which isn't the case now. Those can be, depending on the market, close to 6 figures. In theory you can be non-profit and still have advertisers/sponsers, which PBS already has. They may just need to push that a lot more.
They can easily make that back by charging cable providers for carriage. It doesn't have to be advertising only. People already pay for cable to watch PBS. Let some of the money go back to them. Right now since PBS stations are NCE they are must carry and the cable companies get them for free.

It doesn't have to go commercial either. Colleges and universities can pick up the PBS stations and use them for distance learning and other things.
 
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Fringe Reception

Super Moderator, Chief Content Editor
Staff member
#10
Another consideration are special off-air productions hosted by PBS stations across the Country to generate funding. I wrote about attending the Red Green Wit and Wisdom Tour here: http://www.dtvusaforum.com/content/139-red-green-wit-wisdom-tour-live-show-tour-review.html and all of the proceeds, around $40,000 went to KBTC from his one-man one night show.

We also purchased tickets to see the Trans Siberian Orchestra Christmas Spectacular Trans-Siberian Orchestra - Official website from KBTC and they certainly received a piece of the action from the event which filled the entire Key Arena, where the Seattle Supersonics Basketball Team used to play.

Jim
 

Orrymain

, Blogger: Orry's Orations
#11
I like PBS, but the British shows can be handled by BBC America. We don't need the news shows. They are everywhere on TV. I still have my peeve though. I hate the constant fund raising and never being able to see those shows at regular times. Every time I go 'wow, wanna see that', it's a fundraiser. Those shows or type of shows are never shown without it being a fundraiser. It has bothered me since I was a kid. I kid you not on that. I have grown up hating the way they air those shows.
 

MrPogi

Moderator, , Webmaster of Cache Free TV
Staff member
#12
I like PBS, but the British shows can be handled by BBC America.
I don't get BBC America OTA. Nor does anyone else I know of! I could invest in a FTA dish, but that still won't get me BBC America - maybe just BBC news.
 

Trip

Moderator, , , Webmaster of: Rabbit Ears
Staff member
#14
I don't get BBC America OTA. Nor does anyone else I know of! I could invest in a FTA dish, but that still won't get me BBC America - maybe just BBC news.
It'll get you BBC World Service audio if you're aimed at 58° (or 55°, not sure), but otherwise, I'm not aware of any BBC content up there.

- Trip
 

n2rj

Moderator
Staff member
#15
You do t even need a dish for BBC audio. You can get all of the BBC radio stations streamed online.

If you can proxy into the uk you can even watch BBC tv via iplayer. It won't be live tv I think due to the tv licence fee that is required for all devices that can watch tv as it airs.
 
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FOX TV

Contributor
#16
A Fan's Case for Ending Federal Support to Public Radio and Public TV

From the article:

"At $430 million, public broadcasting is a tiny part of the $3.8 trillion federal budget. Still, it's time to end its role as a political football and a symbol of what government shouldn't be doing. It's time to find another way to help public broadcasting thrive." ...
I agree with Jim on this one, and our state of Virginia just cut funding for public broadcasting substantially. Part of the problem is their political view points, and with federal money and business contributions comes Federal Government and big (THE BROADBAND INDUSTRY COMES TO MIND HERE) business influence in the programming content on its viewpoint. If they spout out the liberal point of view which they ALWAYS do, then I don't think my conservative dollars should be forced to be spent on a view point I don't agree with.

This same scenario applies to unions too. Why should the unions make political contributions to a certain party (Usually the Liberal Democratic point of view ,can you say 780 billion)) that not all union members want to support. Is that fair to force someone to contribute to a political view point or belief that they don't agree with? Not in my eyes it isn't !!

Why do we also have to pay for FREE GOVERNMENT SUPPORTED CELL PHONES for lazy people who won't get off the couch and go to work? Every time I see those commercials I want to throw a shoe or something at the TV. This country will never survive with the Democratic view point of sharing the wealth. Just look at Greece for an example, and look at the current debt this country has built up by practicing this liberal belief over the years, as it has literally broken this country financially.

On the other hand, it may not survive the GOP's idea of "Government of Big Business, for Big Business, by Big Business", and that is an original quote from me, as it describes accurately the way Government is run today, and that applies to the Democrats too. Government of Big Business, for Big Business, by Big Business", does this remind anyone of the current frequency grab in any way?
 
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dkreichen1968

Moderator
Staff member
#17
"Government of Big Business, for Big Business, by Big Business"
Yes FOX, I think that you can sum up the practice of both political parties by that phrase. No one is really looking out for the common man right now. We have two big business parties with slightly different approaches.
 

loneasdqw

DTVUSA Jr. Member
#18
Taking away the funding, but keep the current rules in place for non-commercial licensed stations could force many PBS stations to have longer beg-a-thons (if not every night or weekend). WYIN already holds begathons after 12:30am every night just to stay on the air, or they'd sign off at night (they hold some during the daytime too). They were the last Chicago area station to stay on the air 24 hours a day in 2008 (part of the reason before 2009 was because of the transition to digital).
 

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