A Question About Analog Cable TV

#1
Several of my neighbors subscribe to our local cable company's unadvertised and modestly priced "Basic Broadcast Tier". My neighbors tell me that no "Set Top Box" is required. The cable is directly connected to the antenna input of their old analog TV set.

As I recall, a few years ago, the FCC made a ruling affecting most cable companies. If a cable company provided both analog and digital services, it was obligated to continue supplying its subscribers with analog signals for at least three years after the date of the "Digital TV Transition". If a cable company was a "Digital Only" operation, it was not required to provide an analog alternative for its customers. I do not believe the FCC's policy has changed regarding this matter.

So, on June 13, 2012, cable companies will be able to stop delivering the old analog TV signals if they wish. I think this will impact two groups of cable subscribers: 1) those who have not switched over to a digital service contract and upgraded their old analog TV sets, and, 2) those who have not purchased a "Digital to Analog Converter" and put up some sort of antenna. These folks will be not be able to watch their favorite TV shows as usual until they sign a new cable or satelite service contract or until they are able to receive free "Over The Air" broadcasts.

Is this correct? Your suggestions and comments are always appreciated.

Thank you,
DTV Student
 

MrPogi

Moderator, , Webmaster of Cache Free TV
Staff member
#2
I know Compost, er, comcrap, er, Comcast... is giving a basic box (limit 3, I think) to those on the basic tier with no monthly fee. I think those with a lot of sets hooked to analog will either have to rent boxes, live without or go OTA with those "excess" sets.


The conversion is nearly complete here, this is in UTAH, YMMV.
 

n2rj

Moderator
Staff member
#3
Several of my neighbors subscribe to our local cable company's unadvertised and modestly priced "Basic Broadcast Tier". My neighbors tell me that no "Set Top Box" is required. The cable is directly connected to the antenna input of their old analog TV set.
I believe that what they are referring to is a "digital transport adapter" or DTA. It's a basic cable box with no EPG or two way capability. It can decrypt basic encryption and is aimed primarily at decoding the broadcast basic tier only. Anything beyond that requires a regular cable settop box.

As I recall, a few years ago, the FCC made a ruling affecting most cable companies. If a cable company provided both analog and digital services, it was obligated to continue supplying its subscribers with analog signals for at least three years after the date of the "Digital TV Transition". If a cable company was a "Digital Only" operation, it was not required to provide an analog alternative for its customers. I do not believe the FCC's policy has changed regarding this matter.
The FCC has allowed cable companies to go all digital if they can ensure that all customers have equipment to view basic cable channels. Some cable companies (Comcast) have deployed the DTAs as I've described. Others (Cablevision) have instead to give customers free boxes for a certain period of time.

So, on June 13, 2012, cable companies will be able to stop delivering the old analog TV signals if they wish. I think this will impact two groups of cable subscribers: 1) those who have not switched over to a digital service contract and upgraded their old analog TV sets, and, 2) those who have not purchased a "Digital to Analog Converter" and put up some sort of antenna. These folks will be not be able to watch their favorite TV shows as usual until they sign a new cable or satelite service contract or until they are able to receive free "Over The Air" broadcasts.

Is this correct? Your suggestions and comments are always appreciated.
I think you're confusing DTV converter boxes for over the air (antenna) TV with DTAs for cable.

DTAs work ONLY with cable. They will NOT work with an antenna. They are supplied by the cable company.

DTV converter boxes work ONLY with an antenna. They won't work with cable. YOu buy those from the store and the Gov't used to issue $40 coupons for them.
 

dkreichen1968

Moderator
Staff member
#5
A DTA is a box that coverts digital QAM cable signals to analog for an analog television. The ones that Comcast (A.K.A. Comcrap) is using are about 4" x 4" x 1 1/4" tall.
 
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