Alt Key Characters

Trip

Moderator, , , Webmaster of: Rabbit Ears
Staff member
#2
In Linux, you can configure a Compose Key and instead of memorizing key combinations, you type the Compose Key then a two-key combination. For example, I can type ½ by typing Compose + 1 + 2. I type a ° symbol with Compose + o + o.

I've set my Right Alt to be my Compose Key.

- Trip
 

Piggie

Super Moderator
#3
In Linux, you can configure a Compose Key and instead of memorizing key combinations, you type the Compose Key then a two-key combination. For example, I can type ½ by typing Compose + 1 + 2. I type a ° symbol with Compose + o + o.

I've set my Right Alt to be my Compose Key.

- Trip
Are you sure that is not part of the GUI you are using as opposed to pure command Linux? Most of my linux anymore is over a terminal to my server or router and can I do that with it?
 
#4
i just use an * symbol as i never could figure out how to make a 'degrees' sign or any other without the Character Map which is not present in my distro of Linux.

or i spell it out. 'degrees'. i don't usually specify degrees in metric being non-Canadian and non-foreign so i just type a number. i don't believe in the metric system--never will.

Besides, if i typed my numbers it's too hard to confuse them with American or Metric as if they were metric you'd either be freezing to death or baking on the sun. for example, 80 degrees is a tad hot in metric isn't it?
 

Trip

Moderator, , , Webmaster of: Rabbit Ears
Staff member
#5
Are you sure that is not part of the GUI you are using as opposed to pure command Linux? Most of my linux anymore is over a terminal to my server or router and can I do that with it?
No. To my knowledge, and I could be completely wrong, but I think the Compose Key is a feature of X.

- Trip
 

Piggie

Super Moderator
#6
I don't bother to put degrees when talking temp, just and F, C or K (Kelvin scale). The degrees is implied. Now if I am talking direction I type out degrees, because say 45 azimuth sounds funny, where 45 degrees azimuth doesn't to me.

DTV if you had been born in a country that used the metric system, then your prejudice would just be opposite. I know plenty people that can't stand the American system of measurements. It's mainly a situational prejudice.
 

Piggie

Super Moderator
#7
No. To my knowledge, and I could be completely wrong, but I think the Compose Key is a feature of X.

- Trip
Then it might be the terminal emulator I use doesn't support a Compose key? You have to remember it's been a couple decades since I did Unix (Linux didn't yet exist) on a keyboard. Even then everything was a terminal, no PCs.

(lol, I just read what I posted. Don't you love when people say you "remember, this is this way" when there is a great chance you never knew it? So how is that possible to remember something you never knew? Isn't that a mental illness? lol)
 

Yes616

The Mod Squad
#12
Does anyone know how to do a strike through, where a line is through the words?
Not sure how to do it here but in Word first type the text, highlight it, right click, then select the font tab. Find strikethrough or double strikethrough.

I then copied and pasted to here to find the strikethroughs did not come along. Oh well, someone else can chime in. I tried.
 
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#13
Strike-through is usually a BB code forum feature similar to the tags used for bold, but sadly the code for strike-through is MIA here, if it worked it would be ( ) but it doesn't work--i tried it.
 
#14
Oh, and as far as 'prejudice' for metric/american goes, it's not a hate or dislike. it's just that i've been raised on U.S. so long that it would take a long time to adjust to something i am not used to. while i prefer metric tools (easier than fractions) over SAE tools, sadly when it comes to measurements such as litres vs. gallons or temperatures, well it gives a false reading of it being cheaper for gas when it's priced for litre (96 cents!) or Km/hr looks like you're going really really fast but when converted to MPH it seems my bragging is really unwarranted. i mean 120 Km/hr isn't really as fast as it appears.

When you look at temps in metric, it looks a lot colder than it really is. i mean summers here are below zero metric. that is kind cold feeling! to me below-zero anything is cold cold cold. call it just a victim of being raised on one thing. when it works i refuse to futz it up with something that causes me more stress than it should when i had no real benefit from it.

Same reason i refuse to buy anything new. i have more trouble out of complicated new gadgets than living with the old 1970s-under ones that were made well and meant to be repaired as opposed to thrown out in the garbage--which i'm firmly against with extreme passion. i don't mindlessly believe that new = better. same with metric-- i see no real benefit from converting to it.
 
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Piggie

Super Moderator
#16
Oh, and as far as 'prejudice' for metric/american goes, it's not a hate or dislike. it's just that i've been raised on U.S. so long that it would take a long time to adjust to something i am not used to. while i prefer metric tools (easier than fractions) over SAE tools, sadly when it comes to measurements such as litres vs. gallons or temperatures, well it gives a false reading of it being cheaper for gas when it's priced for litre (96 cents!) or Km/hr looks like you're going really really fast but when converted to MPH it seems my bragging is really unwarranted. i mean 120 Km/hr isn't really as fast as it appears.
Yeah, it's just a mental bookmark. But it's like learning a foreign language, or learning Morse code. You don't translate as you go along. You think terms of the other language. You hear the code as letters, then words as you get better, not dots and dashes. If you never heard of another system, then any system works. If you never heard of MPH, then you would have an instinctive feeling for how fast 120 kph is traveling that speed. The same way if you were used to liters 96 cents would make sense. Then one would say $3.63 a gallon was expensive way to buy gass.

When you look at temps in metric, it looks a lot colder than it really is. i mean summers here are below zero metric. that is kind cold feeling! to me below-zero anything is cold cold cold. call it just a victim of being raised on one thing. when it works i refuse to futz it up with something that causes me more stress than it should when i had no real benefit from it.
Depends where you are on the centigrade scale. If it's 80C then it's very hot.
Summer temps tend to be 23 into the 30s C, you just get used to it.

The benefit is you don't have to remember how many cups in a gallon or better yet how many ounces in a gallon. You just know there are 1000 ml in a liter. The prefix to the unit give you the clue to the size of the unit. You don't have units of force like pounds and ounces (same word as volume unit also), you just use Newtons or Dynes. And one Dyne equals 10 to the minus 5 Newtons, always a power of 10. No real science (engineering yes) is done in anything but the metric system. There are a few odd balls like the Angstrom which is 10 to the minus 10 meters. But most units are also powers of 3 of the exponent of 10.

I like metric better, to me it's a lot easier. I find it easier all over like you find it with wrenches. I just wish people would stop taking my 10 mm open end because I get sick of buying new ones.


Same reason i refuse to buy anything new. i have more trouble out of complicated new gadgets than living with the old 1970s-under ones that were made well and meant to be repaired as opposed to thrown out in the garbage--which i'm firmly against with extreme passion. i don't mindlessly believe that new = better. same with metric-- i see no real benefit from converting to it.
I agree here but it doesn't fit into the infinite energy economy (no longer sustainable) to make something you don't throw away so it can be built again, in particular overseas.

Don't worry too much DTV, the era of throw away stuff will come to an end unless true recycling can be accomplished, not like we do it today, as it takes too much energy to even sustain that. First we need a totally renewable energy source then we could build toss away items if they were recycled.

In the mean time, go to the flea market, buy a used what ever, take it home and fix it. You save a ton of money and not a red cent leaves the country (until you drive home then it goes out your exhaust pipe straight for OPEC).
 

Piggie

Super Moderator
#18
I have found at least on automotive stuff the 10mm is the 7/16" of the metric world. Engineers seem to love to use that head size on bolts.

I am not saying because it fits a 7/16, where a 12mm works better most of the time, but it's designed into metric stuff alot.

Actually it's a lot more like our 3/8", but seems to be more common in metric automotive than 3/8" is in American automotive.

We discussed this before. I also have a cousin to your car still running (though no tag at the moment), a 1987 Dodge Diplomat SE. I had the top redone and painted. The engine and car have 170K miles on them. Thinking of buying another engine for it, but this one is still working. The only major fault is the drivers window switch is broken (replaced many times) and the AC Evaporator needs replacing (expensive).

Where we live I get away with driving around the neighborhood, so it doesn't just sit. I keep saying I am putting a tag back on it, but haven't. I have a spare tag for Florida (here if you don't, it's $250 to get a tag, plus $80 a year for a tag for it). In need to check with my insurance agent but I think between the tag and insurance it would be about $400 to $500 a year to keep it on the road. Right now that is too much money.
 

Piggie

Super Moderator
#19
The secondary topic here that turned metric, interestingly enough all of us here us the metric system nearly daily talking about OTA.

The Watt which is equal to a joule per second. And a Watt is also a volt-ampere. So we use metric electrical units here all the time and never think twice.
 
#20
Actually i have two 'M-body' cars (Diplomat, Gran Fury, Lebaron T&C Sedan, New Yorker/Fifth Avenue ('82-89). one eats torque converters for breakfast (that waits till spring--i am NOT about to drop a tranny in 25 degree weather!) the other one is one year older and is my daily transportation. it's also in a lot better shape.

1985 Chrysler Fifth Avenue



1984 Chrysler Fifth Avenue

 
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