Question: AM/FM Antennas Home theater receivers

jlettie

DTVUSA Rookie
#1
I'm purchasing a Denon surround sound receiver. I would like advise about AM/FM antennas to plug into the back of the receiver? I have heard about Terk, but there antennas put out a lot of static and do not pull FM stations that well. I have heard about another antenna manufacturer GODAR. They make a model DXR 500. Has anyone had any experience with this product? Do AM/FM stations sound clear with no static or background noise? I would be interested in any information. THANKS
 

Fringe Reception

Super Moderator, Chief Content Editor
Staff member
#2
:welcome: jlettie,

For greatly improved AM radio reception the C.Crane Company has developed a compact auxillary antenna that can be located out of sight inside a closet or your attic. Twin Coil Ferrite® Antenna & 25' Install Kit - C. Crane Company (800) 522-8863

FM radio is far more problematic because the signals behave similar to analog television which had 'ghosts' on the screen: that was caused by the signals arriving directly from the transmitter as well as reflected signals off of buildings, hills, etc. It's called multipath distortion.

Please go to FM Fool - Home and enter your address and the maximum height above ground where you could locate an antenna. It will generate a free report based on your location showing what stations are potentially available to you. Please post the result (URL) here: that website will automatically conceal your personal information.

If there is a particular station you want to receive we can make generalized suggestions about the type of antenna it will require.

Jim
 

MrPogi

Moderator, , Webmaster of Cache Free TV
Staff member
#3
Long Wire AM Antenna

If you have a lot of space outdoors, and are feeling handy:
http://www.abc.net.au/reception/radio/am_antenna.htm
Long Wire AM Antenna

The relatively simple long wire antenna can be used as an extension to a radio’s existing antenna, or connected to the radio receiver terminals.

The basic long wire antenna system consists of:
Heavy gauge insulated wire or 4 gauge copper wire for the antenna.
Wire situated at least 2.5 metres high (ie above head height).
The wire should be at least 20 metres long with no joins.
Insulators are installed at each end of the wire to ensure the house and tree (or post) is isolated from the antenna.
The antenna should be placed away from any objects that may interfere with reception.
The feed line is soldered to the antenna wire. There must be a loop in the feed line just before it enters the house so rainwater drips off.
The feed line is connected to the antenna terminal of the radio. A separate wire runs from the earth terminal to an earth spoke.
If the radio does not have terminals, the feed line can be attached to the radio’s own antenna.

I'd say you need a 300, 150 or 75 foot wire length. (approx. 1/4, 1/8, and 1/16 wavelength at the center of the AM band)


This is totally "old school". I used a wire antenna like this that was in the attic of the old house we lived in back when I was 9 years old in the '60's. (The wire must have been there since the 30's!) My little crystal radio pulled in clear channel stations 500+ miles away.

EDIT:
Additional info at this link:
http://www.techlib.com/electronics/antennas.html
 
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#4
I used baseboard heat pipes as an AM antenna years ago & it worked great. The whole house acted like a giant antenna. Not sure if it is a good general recommendation, but it seemed to work well for my situation.
 

MrPogi

Moderator, , Webmaster of Cache Free TV
Staff member
#5
I used baseboard heat pipes as an AM antenna years ago & it worked great. The whole house acted like a giant antenna. Not sure if it is a good general recommendation, but it seemed to work well for my situation.
If it works, then it's good. But with AM, I've found that getting the antenna up and out away from interference cuts the static.
 

Fringe Reception

Super Moderator, Chief Content Editor
Staff member
#6
The C.Crane Ferrite bar indoor antenna has one advantage over a longwire. Its unlikely to ever be hit by lightning.

I've used longwire antennas since the early 60s and like MrPogi, I had a (Philmore) Crystal Radio kit that picked up AM stations all over the Country as well as XERMS (I think) Wolfman Jack's home. Also, as said above, the higher the wire is above ground the better.

Jim
 

MrPogi

Moderator, , Webmaster of Cache Free TV
Staff member
#7
Its unlikely to ever be hit by lightning.
Very true. But if you have an attic big enough to run it, a long wire is a good option that won't get hit by lightning either.
 

SWHouston

Moderator
Staff member
#8
Welcome to the Forum jlettie,

When mentioning your new Amp, you said the FM Antenna would "plug in" ?
Customarily, Amps have a two screw 300 ohm connector, or a Coaxial "F" type connector.
Could it actually be one of those, or is it really a "plug" ?

Dedicated FM Antennas are the best, but, there are alternatives which frequently do quite well...

If the Amp has a "Coaxial" input...
IF you have an OTA-TV Antenna (for local TV Channels) it is possible that it may have a FM band available through it. All one would have to do in that case, is use a Coaxial Cable Splitter, and provide a Cable directly to the Amp from the TV Antenna. (Total cost < $10)

If you happen to have the "300 Ohm" Twin Lead connector on your Amp...
Electronic Supply Stores (like Radio Shack) have what is called a "T" type Twin Lead FM Antenna, which would connect directly to your 300 Ohm connectors on the back of the Amp. (Total cost < $5) I have one of these in use, and find it quite acceptable for reception.

You can also use the "300 Ohm Twin Lead" Antenna, with a Coaxial Adapter...
If you'd like to stay/use the "behind the TV" approach as is with the "T" type Antenna, and defray the cost of installing a special antenna for your FM. They also make an Adaptor from the Twin Lead to Coaxial Cable, which allows the conversion necessary for the connection. (Total cost < $10)

All the above are able to be installed behind your TV Console, and can be done by most any User with out Professional assistance.
 
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