Analog vs digital signal strength

Irmajoan

DTVUSA Jr. Member
#1
I have multi-element VHF and UHF antenna from Radio Shack in the attic, and a rotator. I can receive about five stations in analog TV, where two are sharp and the others are snowy to a degree. This situation has been satisfactory for me for several years.
I bought a digital converter box and installed it between the antenna and TV, but I get no signal for digital stations. One night I set the box to watch antenna digital signal strength, and briefly received four stations at about half strength on the display. Most of the time I get the message of "no signal."
I am planning to move the antenna to a mast on the chimney outside, about ten feet higher than where it is now in the attic. Will this give me enough gain to get the digital stations? The roof construction is asphalt shingles over plywood and 2x6 rafters.
How about if I buy an antenna amplifier? The ads say I can get 30 dB gain that way.
Before I go to all this effort, my basic question is: how many dB of gain do you need to receive a digital signal over an acceptable analog signal strength?
Thanks for your help !

Later, Irmajoan.
 
#2
Yes it will greatly improve your signal the attic will cut antenna performance 50% you may also want to invest in a good pre amp if you live 50 to 60 miles from transmitters channel master titan 7777 is a good one.
 

Irmajoan

DTVUSA Jr. Member
#3
Thanks

Thanks, Cowboy:

Reading this forum has been a terrific benefit to me. Ain't the Internet the greatest invention since the wheel?

Cowboy, I sure hope somebody is paying you well for moderating this board.
You are doing a great service to your country, and we TV watchers appreciate it.

I'll let you know how my antenna project works out when I get it up.

Later, Irmajoan.
 
#4
pay close attention your tvfool results note wither the stations are uhf or Vhf if they are one or the other a VHF or UHF antenna will do better than a combo antenna because they are higher gain. many people use separate UHF and VHf antennas to get the best reception in both areas. I am glad you have found this forum helpful and hope you continue to find useful info here it is our pleasure to help those who are seeking information on the transition:).
 

Irmajoan

DTVUSA Jr. Member
#5
Cowboyup:

Do you have a good reference on guidance for grounding of outdoor, chimney mounted, antenna masts? Or should I just go to the library and consult a copy of the NEC (Nat'l Electrical Code)?

Thanks, Irmajoan.
 
#6
Cowboyup:

Do you have a good reference on guidance for grounding of outdoor, chimney mounted, antenna masts? Or should I just go to the library and consult a copy of the NEC (Nat'l Electrical Code)?

Thanks, Irmajoan.
Antenna Basics
Attach a piece of copper wire to the antenna mast run it down the mast and then down the side of the house/chimney to a piece of pipe or a ground rod that has been driven into the ground about 6 ft. this will ground the antenna mast. attach a grounding block form radio shack to the house where the coax goes into the house run the coax from the antenna to the ground block then from the ground block into the house to the equipment. attach a copper wire to the ground block and run to the pipe or the ground rod. place a ground rod clamp form lowes local hardware over the pipe or rod, insert the two copper wires into the clamp and tighten this will ground both the coax and the antenna. nex attach all equipment to a good surge protector. your good to go:)
 
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Irmajoan

DTVUSA Jr. Member
#8
OK. I have installed my multi-element VHF - UHF antenna on a 10 foot mast, with a rotator, on the chimney over my house. My analog TV signal strength is a lot stronger than before, when the antenna was in the attic. I get more stations, and the former snowy ones are now sharp. My digital TV signal strength is not yet acceptable, dropping out during the day, and sometimes good enough at night to watch a whole show. Since all my digital TV stations, according to tvfool, will be UHF after the changeover, can you recommend the highest gain UHF antenna I should buy? Thanks for you help (again!).

Later, Irmajoan.
 
#9
OK. I have installed my multi-element VHF - UHF antenna on a 10 foot mast, with a rotator, on the chimney over my house. My analog TV signal strength is a lot stronger than before, when the antenna was in the attic. I get more stations, and the former snowy ones are now sharp. My digital TV signal strength is not yet acceptable, dropping out during the day, and sometimes good enough at night to watch a whole show. Since all my digital TV stations, according to tvfool, will be UHF after the changeover, can you recommend the highest gain UHF antenna I should buy? Thanks for you help (again!).

Later, Irmajoan.
Antennas direct 91-XG with a wineguard 4800 pre amp if the transmitters are over 50 mile out. this will give possible 100 mile range on this antenna as it has a 70 mile range without. buy from solid signal .com
 
#10
Do you have a rotor? I think it would be good for you to get one that way you can point the antenna in the transmitters direction. This is very important.

Antennaweb can give you all the compass orientations and channels available as well as what directions to point to such as north, south, east, west etc.

AntennaWeb
 
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