Another what antenna question

Fringe Reception

Super Moderator, Chief Content Editor
Staff member
#2
:welcome: Markfromct,

Your antenna survey is based by default at five feet above the ground level and it shows real promise. Have you tried any antennas yet and if so, what antennas (brand/model) and which channels have you been able to receive using them?

You have both high-band and one low-band VHF station you can probably receive but beware, an antenna that is designed to receive real channel 2 is half the size of a transit bus. Your potentially available channels come to you from all around the compass which suggests two options: using a mast with one or more combined antennas and a rotor (antenna rotator) or several fixed combined antennas and at least a 2-way 'A-B' switch.

Unfortunately, omnidirectional antennas rarely work for HDTV but bi-directional antennas can work (in some cases). If you could provide a list of the most important and second most important channels to you, it would help us.

Jim
 

Jim5506

DTVUSA Member
#3
You can get most of the stations you need with just a UHF antenna.

Point it west and you'll get all the Hartford channels, but they don't have an ABC affiliate.

The one small fly in the ointment is that your ABC stations are either out of Springfield Mass., or New Haven, Conn.

I would try a four-bay stack antenna like the Channel Master 4221 and point it southwest to see if it will pick up WTNH out of Hartford and still get all the Hartford UHF channels too.

Mount it outside about 25 ft AGL (above ground level) and see what happens.

There is one VHF high band station on channel 11 (NBC) out of Springfield, Mass. and another on channel 9 out of Norwich, Conn.
These are both network duplicates and only worth trying for if you like to experiment.

There are two VHF low band stations, one on channel 2 and the other on channel 6, but they are both over 80 miles away and thusly almost impossible to receive without heroic efforts.

Best of luck with you viewing.
 
#4
Thank You for the responses!

We have just decided to get rid of cable so we have not tried any antennas yet.

We want to make sure we can get at least one station of all the major networks. Since one ABC station is in New Haven(VHF) and one is in Springfield(UHF), which one would be the easiest one to pick up wthout losing the other stations?

So I don't need a UHF-VHF combo antenna? Is the consensus that I should be able to get all major stations with a four-bay UHF antenna such as the CM 4221?
I was originally thinking of the Winegard 7696HP.

Mark
 

Jim5506

DTVUSA Member
#5
The ideal way would be to use two antennas, UHF only pointed west and a VHF high band pointed southwest toward New Haven and connect them with a UVSJ (UHF/VHF signal joiner).

A Winegard HD 4400 is about $21 (CM 4221HD is $50) and an AntennaCraft Y5-7-13 is about $21 and the UVSJ is about $2. (prices @ SolidSignal.com - shipping is less than $15 for all three), so for less than $60 you get all three shipped and delivered.

Pick up some cable, a mast and tripod or whatever and you're up and running for less than $100 easy.

You might shop locally and see what you can find.
 
#6
Thanks.

If I didn't want to go the route of using two antennas and wanted one antenna to view the following stations, what would be your suggestions?

Major stations:

WFSB
WTIC
WVIT
WCCT
WEDH
For the ABC station either WGGB or WTNH whichever would be easiest.

Less important:

WWLP
WCTX
 

Tim58hsv

DTVUSA Member
#7
Go with a UHF 4 or 8-bay antenna. One of those should pick up everything on your list above including the VHF channel. The one exception might be WCTX which you would possibly need to turn the antenna in the direction of the station in order to pick it up.
 

Fringe Reception

Super Moderator, Chief Content Editor
Staff member
#8
Mark, et al:

Tim's reply may be very valid and satisfactory to some, but there is a reason my moniker is fringe reception. I don't like to lose.

A few years ago we had a major snowfall and the power grid failed for the CBS Translator I usually watch. No problem for me, because I was setup to switch to the local Main CBS affiliate. Had that power gone down, I also had a third CBS source available to me.

My motivation is to make as many stations that are easily received available and to not limit myself to a single cluster of stations in one direction that all rely on the same power grid. I have personal experience and it works for meeeee!

By the way, ALL cable was down here at the same time for almost 4 days. And people pay for that?

Jim
 
#9
It looks like the two Jims have looked into your situation pretty thoroughly.

If you only want one antenna, then you're back to one of those Winegard HD769 series antennas. Point it at 240 and on a good day you should be able to get channel 10 WTNH. But those are some monster antennas, and a little pricey. I think Jim5506 was trying to save you a few bucks.

Another possibility is the 4228HD. It pulls in some high VHF better than the original 4228. Again, 240 degrees, good day, channel 10. YMMV. Goes for about $86 I think. Not quite so massive as the HD769x.

With a rotor, you could get WGGB with very little problem. But a rotor has its own cost and maintenance problems.

Or you could combine two 4400's (much smaller = easier to mount) several yards apart and use an AB switch as Fringe suggested.

Major stations:

WFSB
No problem.

NP

NP

NP

NP

For the ABC station either WGGB or WTNH whichever would be easiest.
Now we have a problem. :ballchain: See above.

Less important:
WWLP
That's going to be a problem even with an HD769x. Which way you gonna point it? At this point you're looking at a VHF/UHF solution plus a rotor.

This one you also might get at 240 degrees, but please don't count on it.

If someone in your neighborhood has a nice looking outdoor antenna, you could always knock on their door. Or just check it out. See if you can figure out how it works (if it works).

Rick
 
Last edited:

Similar threads

Top