antenna help please

mx88

DTVUSA Rookie
#1
I'm looking for the best setup at a reasonable cost. I plan on mounting my antenna on my roof (metal) about 20' high. I have 4 tvs and the longest run should be about 35'. Here is a area analysis.

TV Fool

I appreciate any help you can give me I am hoping to stop my cable bill or lower it severely.
 

MrPogi

Moderator, , Webmaster of Cache Free TV
Staff member
#2
Tough one. They're all far away and spread over about 130 degrees. All edge signals, no LOS. And above a metal roof, too. How high above the metal roof can you get?

I did just notice that you didn't enter a height above the ground for that report, so it calculated the signal at ground level - could you re-do your report at 20 feet for us?


If you can get channel 9 for PBS, you don't need a VHF-lo antenna for channel 6.

I'm thinking: Big antenna, VHF-hi/UHF - possibly a Winegard HD7698P HDTV High Band VHF-UHF Antenna. Probably with a pre-amp.

I don't see any way to get by without installing a rotor, any antenna that can do this is very directional.

Please re-do that TVfool report and post it back here for us.
 

dkreichen1968

Moderator
Staff member
#3
I do agree with MrPogi's antenna choice, but not necessarily with the "must have a rotor" analysis. There are a lot of stations, including all the major networks between 13 and 30 degrees magnetic (17 degrees, with the beam width for the HD7698P at 30 degrees). The lowest is WLOS (ABC) at 1.6 dB noise margin on channel 13. Gain for the HD7698P on channel 13 is 12 dB. 12 + 1.6= 13.6 You will probably want to use an amp since you have 4 TVs, but as it stands you should have about 10 dB of noise margin (solid reception) if you use a Channel Master CM-7777 or better amp (2.8 dB of noise).

Alternatively, the big 4 networks coming out of Augusta are at 120 degrees magnetic.
 

SWHouston

Moderator
Staff member
#5
Even with an extremely large antenna, amp and Rotor, I think you'll only get limited results. I'd go with a "deal" from another Cable/Sat provider for short term (1yr) and keep changing to the cheapest acceptable PTV package.
 

Fringe Reception

Super Moderator, Chief Content Editor
Staff member
#6
:welcome: mx88,

I agree with Mr Pogi, that it will require a large/long antenna. If possible, install it on the north side of your home to avoid unpredicable signal reflections from your metal roof.

Jim
 
#7
Here is my report at 20'. I was only planning on going a few foot above my roof please let me know if I need to rethink that. thanks for your help

TV Fool
Wow, your strongest station is 58.7 miles away! After that it's 69 to 109 miles!! Nothing line-of-sight!!! Going to take a big investment and lots of work to get anything worthwhile.

Unfortunately, I bet the cable co. knows exactly where you're at, an they jack up the price accordingly. Can you get a satellite dish and/or fiber optic TV to give them some competition? If not, geez, I'd think about movin! :bolt: Doggies!

Rick
 

SWHouston

Moderator
Staff member
#8
To put that in a more practical prospective...

I see the possibility of one station being received with reliability.
3, maybe 4 others, IF it's a good reception day, and
to get that done, spending $350-$450.
 

dkreichen1968

Moderator
Staff member
#9
Well yes, but tvfool predicts relatively high signal strengths even for the stations that are at 109 miles. You of little faith!!! I have to assume the relative elevations between the stations and our OP are quite favorable. People in Cheyenne, WY are able to get all Denver full powers at 100+ miles(i.e. with this TVfool) , so why not in GA?

Stop being pay-TV enablers!!!

Let's see here, even if the OP spends $500 on his system at $70 a month it's paid for in slightly over 7 months. 100% free TV after that!!!
 
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Fringe Reception

Super Moderator, Chief Content Editor
Staff member
#12
Dan,

Please enlighten us how the Crown Royal bag improves your antenna. Are there secret magnetowhoopiedo 'green things' in there?

Jim
 
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dkreichen1968

Moderator
Staff member
#14
I don't drink Crown, but my ex-wife could drink 6 double shots without it even phasing her. Not exactly a "cheap drunk." I ended up with an entire drawer of dust rags/lamp stand protectors.
 
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Fringe Reception

Super Moderator, Chief Content Editor
Staff member
#15
Dan, (off-topic)

I had a buddy many years ago who collected CR bags from any and everyone and ultimately, he had someone make a King sized bed quilt from them. Too bad he didn't know your ex ...

Jim
 
#16
People in Cheyenne, WY are able to get all Denver full powers at 100+ miles(i.e. with this TVfool)
Holy smokes! So a signal beyond line of sight CAN BE RELIABLE? I've been misled??

Isn't it possible Cheyenne residents are OK with spotty reception on a few stations because they can always switch to one of the many greens on their list? OP has nothing line of sight! People aren't satisfied nowadays with a signal that goes out more than 5% of the time in the space of an hour. :whoo:

Rick
 

nbound-au

The Graveyard Shift
#17
Yes a signal that doenst have LOS can be just as reliable as one that does. Its a little harder without a signal meter of course, especially on distant installs.

Many of my jobs are not LOS, and with the mindset when it comes to OTA here, anything short of a good install (all channels, reliably) usually isnt acceptable.
 
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dkreichen1968

Moderator
Staff member
#20
Holy smokes! So a signal beyond line of sight CAN BE RELIABLE? I've been misled??

Yes, you have been misled. I don't know where the internet myth (hoax) that you must have line of sight to get reliable DTV reception comes from (other than the liars at CEA), but it is simply that (a myth and a hoax). All of my Denver stations are second edge, and all of my Denver stations are 100% reliable. 100 miles isn't all that big of a deal as long as there is an elevation difference to make up for the curvature of the earth. If a 15 kW station will carry 47.5 miles, how far will a Megawatt station carry?
 
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