Antenna Suggestion Needed for Detroit Area

biniecki

DTVUSA Jr. Member
#1
I am looking for suggestions on which antennas will work the best for my area. I currently live in Rockwood, MI which is located between Detroit, MI and Toledo, OH. From the tvfools report the main tower areas are located both to the north and south. I am not sure if I would be better off with 2 single direction antennas or if a single multi-directeion antenna would be best. I plan to hopefully mount a setup on my roof which is roughly 10' - 15' high and use RG6 cable. I will probably need about 25' - 30' of cable to get into the house and then hope to split the signal to 3 TVs. I am assuming I may need some sort of pre-amp to accomplish this but I am not really sure. Im not looking at to capture every channel signal in my area. I would be happy if I got a total to like 10 - 20
 
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SWHouston

Moderator
Staff member
#2
We really need to see your TVFool report !
Copy the bold typed line in the upper part of the report, and paste it in your next post.
 

Fringe Reception

Super Moderator, Chief Content Editor
Staff member
#6
biniecki,

SW selected one of very few antennas that are designed receive in more than one direction and although I do not have personal experience testing one, it is a good choice. When the two bays of elements are pointing in the same direction, the antenna offers the most signal gain but when pointed in different directions, both bays will lose at least 3db.

Another option would be to buy a Channel Master HD-4221 and remove the reflector element section, making it a two-directional antenna. The antenna's mounting bracket is part of the reflector panel so you would have to fabricate a new mounting bracket. I can't say how much signal loss it would have sans a reflector, but I suspect it would be around 3db. The advantage is, a 'bare-bones' HD-4221 would weigh much less than a HDBHX and it would have far less wind loading. Search: HD4221 - Solid Signal

Jim
 

Fringe Reception

Super Moderator, Chief Content Editor
Staff member
#7
biniecki,

SW selected one of very few antennas that are designed receive in more than one direction and although I do not have personal experience testing one, it is a good choice. When the two bays of elements are pointing in the same direction, the antenna offers the most signal gain but when pointed in different directions, both bays will lose at least 3db.

Another option would be to buy a Channel Master HD-4221 and remove the reflector element section, making it a two-directional antenna. The antenna's mounting bracket is part of the reflector panel so you would have to fabricate a new mounting bracket. I can't say how much signal loss it would have sans a reflector, but I suspect it would be around 3db. The advantage is, a 'bare-bones' HD-4221 would weigh much less than a HDBHX and it would have far less wind loading. Search: HD4221 - Solid Signal

Jim
 

Fringe Reception

Super Moderator, Chief Content Editor
Staff member
#9
The rule is to test an antenna connected to only one TV and establish received channels after scanning for and rescanning every time you move the antenna. When you find the best place to mount the antenna, mount it. Next, try to split the received signals to other TVs ... often, no amplifiers are required. If you split the signals and you lose channels, come back and we can work with this.

Jim
 

SWHouston

Moderator
Staff member
#10
Placing a Splitter at the mid point between the Antenna, and the fartherest TV, often times avoids the need for Amps. Using that point of reference, give us estimated distances to the equipment.

PS:
If running coax through the Attic, don't forget to allow for the drop down through the walls (about 7') and enough "in room" coax to comfortably connect to the equipment.
 
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biniecki

DTVUSA Jr. Member
#11
From the location I plan to place the antenna, I probably need around 25ft to 30ft of coax to get into my network closet inside my house. From the closet one of the TVs is directly above in my bedroom which is about 15ft from where the current splitter is. Another TV is about 10ft to 15ft in the lowest level. The final TV which is on the main level would be the furthest and is probably 25ft away.

I am leaning towards purchasing the HDB8X and setting it for 2 directions. Does anyone know what the degree of view is for this antenna? For example if I aim for 195 how far +- will I be able to pickup. The specifications state 60* beam width, which I assume is for 1 direction. Splitting the antenna into 2 direction I would assume the beam is cut in half to about 30*. If this is true given the example above if I aim one of them at 195 I should be able to pick stations in the 180 to 210 right?
 
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SWHouston

Moderator
Staff member
#12
All those measurements are fine. I'd be surprised if you need any amplification at all.
However, others comments may agree or not ?

PS:
But if you do, you probably will need a special Splitter.
The special part of it is that there is "Power Passing" on one or all ports.

If you choose/need an amp,
Try to get one that is powered thru the Coaxial Cable you're using now.
Otherwise, you'll need to run a separate Power Cable for it.
 
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