Antenna Suggestions for Strawberry California

Zephar

DTVUSA Jr. Member
#1
At 60 ft http://www.tvfool.com/?option=com_wrapper&Itemid=29&q=id=e6a43f18091e27
at 40 ft http://www.tvfool.com/?option=com_wrapper&Itemid=29&q=id=e6a48244e41e84
I am Considering those two heights for the antenna.

I am in between the decision of purchasing a master piece 100
https://www.channelmaster.com/Masterpiece_Digital_HDTV_Antenna_p/cm-5020.htm

Or
The
the Deny's HD Stacker TV Antenna
http://dennysantennaservice.com/hd_stacker_tv_antenna-html.html

I just wondering anyone having any experience with either of these antenna or other suggestions for the location? It does snow alot at this location. So would need a durable antenna.

Looking to get ABC NBC CBS FOX and ION.

Figure I need a preamp that has very low noise. Any suggestions on what preamp has the lowest noise? Do you think I will need an LTE filter or ways I can check on that?

thanks for reading

Paul
 

Fringe Reception

Super Moderator, Chief Content Editor
Staff member
#3
The VHF antenna "Denny's Stacker" uses is the same Winegard (compromise) low-band / high-band VHF antenna that was Marketed as the Ernst Hardware Seattle-ite Antenna for many years in Seattle, beginning around 1970. I have to assume it has been offered around the Country with different names. Mechanically, I know for a fact it will survive 80 mph winds (even if my neighbor's roof didn't) ...

I personally owned two of them but I would NOT recommend it for your location (even at 60 feet above ground level) because it has minimal ability to collect signals (gain) and you must collect RF signals to be able to watch TV. That antenna was originally intended for a "metro" area and by design, it is not intended for a fringe location.

Jim

PS The UHF antenna in that pair is highly directional, thus it offers high gain and it is not a bad choice.
 
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Zephar

DTVUSA Jr. Member
#4
The VHF antenna "Denny's Stacker" uses is the same Winegard (compromise) low-band / high-band VHF antenna that was Marketed as the Ernst Hardware Seattle-ite Antenna for many years in Seattle, beginning around 1970. I have to assume it has been offered around the Country with different names. Mechanically, I know for a fact it will survive 80 mph winds (even if my neighbor's roof didn't) ...

I personally owned two of them but I would NOT recommend it for your location (even at 60 feet above ground level) because it has minimal ability to collect signals (gain) and you must collect RF signals to be able to watch TV. That antenna was originally intended for a "metro" area and by design, it is not intended for a fringe location.

Jim

PS The UHF antenna in that pair is highly directional, thus it offers high gain and it is not a bad choice.
Well, just saw your message and actually antenna been ordered so I will see how it does. Little confused on your message. Are you saying the part for VHF dont look to good, but the other part of the antenna For UHF looks good?
Perhaps I should of went with the Winegard HD7698P
 

Fringe Reception

Super Moderator, Chief Content Editor
Staff member
#5
Zephar,

The UHF antenna is a good choice but the VHF antenna does not offer much signal gain: it was originally designed for inner-City use (near antenna transmitters) and not for long distance reception: nevertheless, it may work well. If it isn't adequate, it can be replaced with a different antenna and combined with the UHF antenna in the stack.

Jim
 

Zephar

DTVUSA Jr. Member
#6
Zephar,

The UHF antenna is a good choice but the VHF antenna does not offer much signal gain: it was originally designed for inner-City use (near antenna transmitters) and not for long distance reception: nevertheless, it may work well. If it isn't adequate, it can be replaced with a different antenna and combined with the UHF antenna in the stack.

Jim
Thanks for your clarification. Only one VHF channel he needs its in high vhf range. Guess will see what happens.

Going to be around 75 feet in line. really borderline to me if I should or should not use preamp. I know the newer winegards seem to have low noise insertion.

Also I heard someone claiming solid copper works better then regular rg6? from my communications experience its always high frequencies where the solid copper is needed. Is their a reason I am not thinking on that?

any thoughts be much appreciated

thanks
 
#7
At RF frequencies copper plated steel coax should work just as good as solid copper in carrying signal. As RF TV signals travels on the surface of the coax. Study RF Skin effect. Solid copper has less resistance to direct current, and can improve voltage if it is needed to power a pre-amp. The copper plating on the steel center conductor can become damaged, and create problems.
 
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Zephar

DTVUSA Jr. Member
#8
At RF frequencies copper plated steel coax should work just as good as solid copper in carrying signal. As RF TV signals travels on the surface of the coax. Study RF Skin effect. Solid copper has less resistance to direct current, and can improve voltage if it is needed to power a pre-amp. The copper plating on the steel center conductor can become damaged, and create problems.
Thanks, you reconfirmed what I thought I already knew, but from other articles I read I was wondering if I was missing something new found. Think I will go with Solid copper just because of how the center steel can become damaged. especially with the bad weather you can get at this location.
 
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