MLB: Are Minor League Baseball Players Underpaid?

Lily13

DTVUSA Member
#2
That is sad... and aren't the pros OVERpaid? I don't really know exactly how much they get but in most sports, their salaries are sick. So maybe just go Robin Hood on them, take a bit from the already rich ones and give a pay raise to those poor guys in training. It's ok if it's just like a part time job for them but if they have to sacrifice so much of their time... Unfair/
 
#3
Minor leaguers don't make much at all and as a matter of fact many of them have other jobs during the offseason to support themselves and their families. A lot of them I am sure deal with it because they are chasing their dream.
 
#4
firstly they are getting paid to play a sport, hardly comparable to working in fast food over a hot stove all day. second, they choose to be ball-players, with the hope of someday being brought up to the majors, where they will acheive that bloated salary. and you cant compare to professionals because they sell tickets and merchandise, so even though they get paid huge amounts the revenue they bring in far exceeds what is spent. a minor league player does not generate revenue for a ball club, and should be paid accordingly. NCAA athletes are the only one's truely being exploited, they bring in huge amounts of revenue and are not paid for it (sure you can argue scholarships make up for it) but considering NCAA football is a multi-billion dollar enterprise they should be getting a little cut.
 
#5
I just wonder how the courts will end up ruling on this if it goes there...I think the Minor League players could make a case to keep pay raises equivalent to inflation based on the case the article makes for what they made in the 1970s as compared to today (when normalized for inflation). Chasing a dream, play a game, etc, got that bit. Still a job though, so would think similar rules would apply.
 

Orrymain

, Blogger: Orry's Orations
#6
That was really interesting. I knew it was tough, but had no idea they were all that underpaid. Of course, get to be a big star and that makes up for it big time. That's still a small percentage, though.
 
#7
That was really interesting. I knew it was tough, but had no idea they were all that underpaid. Of course, get to be a big star and that makes up for it big time. That's still a small percentage, though.
Right, it is a small percentage and any player who gets drafted to the minor leagues KNOWS this and proceeds to prusue that carrer regardless. For every 100 minor league players there is one Nate Shierholtz, and they all aspire to be such, knowing they might never succeed. It would be like calling a on-a-streak gambler a good investor, right before he loses everything. They are not oblivious to the situation, a player simply joins the minor leagues with the hope of proving himself and gaining a spot on the roster.
 
#8
Sadly in this world today people get paid by ranks. In other words, ex: If Muhammad Ali was still able to box ,he would paid way more then a boxer who may have just entered into boxing. Why?, because Muhammad Ali have years of experience and have acquired more skills over those years he had boxed. So, a minor league baseball player is not going to make as much money as someone like Arod. Arod has many years of experience. I'm not sure if I'm spelling it right , but you understand what I mean.
 
#9
A-rod is a terrible example. He in fact would be proof that skill, and experience DOES NOT affect your pay in the majors. He was signed to a record-breaking deal with the Rangers back when he was mediocre at best. People like A-rod, or Lebron James, do not get paid based off their abilities or history but by the selling power of their name, and how lucrative their merchandise will be
 
#10
Right, it is a small percentage and any player who gets drafted to the minor leagues KNOWS this and proceeds to prusue that carrer regardless. For every 100 minor league players there is one Nate Shierholtz, and they all aspire to be such, knowing they might never succeed. It would be like calling a on-a-streak gambler a good investor, right before he loses everything. They are not oblivious to the situation, a player simply joins the minor leagues with the hope of proving himself and gaining a spot on the roster.
Yeah, I just think if my newly adopted home state is going to start paying the guy who makes my burger at In-N-Out 15 bucks an hour, then maybe we should pay these guys the same...only give A-Rod say 20 mil a year...that would be enough money right? :)
Not as bad as the monopoly of college sports making billions on the backs of athletes, but close.
 

ageematt20

DTVUSA Jr. Member
#11
Okay so first being a ball player I agree that salaries in the minor leagues are minimal. However although many of these players have jobs in the offseason most are generally young in age and do not have families to provide for. The chance to continue playing the game is priceless as any ball player will tell you, and getting the chance to potentially make it to the bigs is an even sweeter deal. The only problem that I have with the system of Major League Baseball is that many players are straight from high school and a small percentage of them make the majors. This does not allow them to gain a degree in college or higher education which leaves them unprepared if their career does not pan out. In conclusion however getting paid to play a game you grew up to play is enough of compensation.
 

Cadus

DTVUSA Member
#12
Yeah, I don't know about underpaid, it's supply and demand. People normally don't have a minor league team that they root for, it's going to be the best of the best. I do think that the pros are overpaid, though, as someone said. You can't say that Minor League players are just playing a game--they devote their lives to it. It's their job, and they take a ton of crap to continue playing that game.
 

ageematt20

DTVUSA Jr. Member
#13
I agree that being a minor league ballplayer is a job and they do take a ton of crap. However just like you said they take that crap to continue playing a game which is what any ballplayer wants to do. If a true ballplayer had it his way he'd die of old age playing on the field. Also I agree with the supply and demand point and although Major League players are overpaid as long as the owners continue paying those amounts they will keep taking what they feel is fair.
 
#14
you always have to take into consideration the balance of power here. The Chicago Whitesox went as far as to throw the World Series in 1912 because management rode them so hard and paid them so little. Minor League seems to be in the same situation these days where management rides on the hopes and prayers of young players to become something other than a minor leaguer and ride that hope until the wheels come off.
 

Funafuti

DTVUSA Member
#15
I am not an A-Rod fan at all - in fact, as a Yankees fan I'm embarrassed that he ever wore the pinstripes. But I have to take exception with your statement that "[h]e was signed to a record-breaking deal with the Rangers back when he was mediocre at best." When he signed with the Rangers he was a 25-year old who was a four-time all star and four-time silver slugger award winning shortstop with a career batting average of .309. In the previous three seasons he had hit a total of 125 home runs with 367 RBI and 367 runs scored. The contract he signed with the Rangers was ridiculous and unprecedented, but I don't think it's fair to say he was "mediocre at best."
 
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