Best Antenna for Downtown Miami

U

Unregistered

Guest
#1
Hi all, I recently moved to Miami and live downtown in the middle of a concrete jungle. At my old apartment I had a rooftop antenna that worked great but that's not an option here unfortunately. I'm not very familiar with what antenna I can use in my current situation and was hoping you guys could help me. Here is my tvfool analysis:

TV Fool

If I can get PBS I'll be ecstatic. ABC and CBS would also be nice. Luckily my apartment faces northward and has a balcony so I can mount something outside if necessary. There are also two blocks between my building and the closest highrise to the north, about a quarter of a mile, so nothing tall is immediately blocking the antenna. If you need any other information about the setup and location to help in offering advice I'll be glad to answer. Thank you for any help you can provide me!

Jeff
 

Fringe Reception

Super Moderator, Chief Content Editor
Staff member
#2
New guest,

Terrific antenna survey! You could probably use the proverbial paperclip to receive free OTA, but that's a misnomer. I would consider using a DB-2 in your north-facing window because unlike 'flat panel vinyl antennas' it will have more ability to collect VHF signals. Secondly, it can be modified to increase its VHF reception abilities. Can you dedicate a north facing window for this real antenna?

Or ... install it outside and who know what you might receive ...

Jim

 
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jeff6806

DTVUSA Rookie
#3
I only have one window aside of the door to the balcony so I'll probably just mount it outside on the balcony railing. It's great to know I should be able to get good OTA reception. Thanks for your help!
 
#7
TV Fool

If I can get PBS I'll be ecstatic. ABC and CBS would also be nice. Luckily my apartment faces northward and has a balcony so I can mount something outside if necessary.
Man, with that TVFool Report, you're gonna get two or three PBS stations plus ABC, CBS, NBC, FOX, MyN, ION, CW ... I imagine ThisTV and MeTV are hiding in there somewhere as well... probly the new Movies channel. Around 36 stations = 90 channels and subchannels.

Rick
 

Jim5506

DTVUSA Member
#8
One problem you may encounter in a strong signal area with buildings around you is multi-path (reflections).

The digital signal can bounce around off buildings and attack your antenna from many different directions, each signal being slightly off time from all the others, confusing your tuner so it gives up - no picture at all.

Sometimes in this situation you need a VERY directional antenna, if this is the case, yagi style antennas are more directional than bow-tie /cat whiskers antennas.

Channels 9 and 45 are so strong you may not be able to receive them, it looks like they may be broadcast from an adjacent building - sort of like standing 3 feet away from a high power spot light, all you see is the bright light and nothing else and it is so intense you cant look at it.
 
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G

Guest

Guest
#9
So I guess then I should start with a multi-directional and see if it works and if I'm not getting clear signals then switch to a directional?
 

jeff6806

DTVUSA Rookie
#10
So I should start with a multi-directional and see if that works and if the reception isn't clear or keeps cutting out switch to a directional?

(Sorry to mods for posting twice, I forgot to log in the first time around)
 

scandiskwindows9x

Moderator of DTV Latino
#11
could him use an antenna that have a moderate gain and be with reflector on V shape? in this case

jim can him use a signal attenuator and do a low attenuation to get those channels or perhaps facing the antenna in other direction perhaps if combine a directional antenna with perhaps 8-15Db gain could get good results
 
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#12
So I should start with a multi-directional and see if that works and if the reception isn't clear or keeps cutting out switch to a directional?
What the ... who said that??? I would think a multi-directional antenna would increase the chance of multi-path, at least theoretically. But anyhow, I don't think anyone here has ever suggested a multi (or "omni")-directional anything to anyone, in all the thousands of posts I've read. Maybe I could find an exception if I did an organized search... :confused:
 

Jim5506

DTVUSA Member
#14
A bow tie type even several stacked vertically will have a wide beam.

Horizonally stacking bow tie antennas narrows the beam, but if you want a highly directional antenna, a yagi or some type of log-periodic with lots of elements is your cup of tea, unless you go to an exotic like the Channel Master 5251.
 
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