Broke the antenna wire off in converter box

Keera

DTVUSA Rookie
#1
I have broken off the coax wire needle inside my converter box and I can't get it out. I've tried shaking the converter and turning it upseide down but it seems to have lodged itself inside the hole. Is there a trick to it?
 

Piggie

Super Moderator
#5
I have had them break off so there was nothing to grab with pliers. Took the covers off and back of the F connector was mounted to a circuit board and the rear covered. I did use a very thin dental pick, going in beside it and worked it out until I could get pliers on it.
 

1inxs

DTVUSA Member
#6
I have broken off the coax wire needle inside my converter box and I can't get it out. I've tried shaking the converter and turning it upseide down but it seems to have lodged itself inside the hole. Is there a trick to it?
Keera, Welcome to the DTVUSA Forum. If you are unable to remove the broken wire, you can slip another wire inside to determine the depth the broken wire is located. I would then cut the wire out of the new coaxial cable connector short enough to contact the old broken wire inside the CECB. That should make contact and allow you to continue using the CECB. Just make sure to leave the cable connected to the CECB permanently. If you ever need to disconnect the CECB, disconnect it from the TV side and leave the cable attached to the CECB.
 

Piggie

Super Moderator
#9
I ended up using a sewing needle to work out the broken needle. It's all I had and it worked. lol thaniyou everyone.
Excellent. 99% of getting one out is patience. I know been there before myself.

There is a tool we used hardware electronics, we called a pick. I looked like a dental pick but it as straight and very thin and strong. In the industry back in the day we had thousands of connections around the studio and some where something would break off inside something.
 

1inxs

DTVUSA Member
#11
This will never happen if you use high quality cable. The cheap stuff breaks really easy.
Never say never. It does happen all the time. I use quality supplies and had it happen to me. See Piggies post. I'm sure most broadcast stations use quality equipment and Piggie wrote
In the industry back in the day we had thousands of connections around the studio and some where something would break off inside something.
You got to figure the cable manufacturers are making many thousand feet of cable in a run. There is bound to be an occasional flaw in the run.
 

Piggie

Super Moderator
#12
Three biggest causes of connector failure.

One is bending it inserting it.

Two is a mis adjusted stripper or striping by hand you nick the center conductor normally right where it comes out of the center foam insulation because you were removing the insulation.

Three. Wire is made continuous to a point. But they will internally splice wire to continue a roll.

On three I was really unluckly lately. I bought 12 feet of flexible stranded #10 3 conductor to run my well from the generator. I bought it a year ago, ohmed it out, simple cable no big deal but didn't test it. I tested it 2 weeks ago. About 2 feet from the generator end there is a hot spot. Not real hot but hot. I am sure this is because buying 12 lousy feet of cable I was unlucky enough to buy a splice.

It's not worth worrying about. The pump pulls 10 amps, 20 surge to start. Number 10 cable is rated to 30 amps up to 100 ft. So I am running much less than that through much shorter piece. I see no voltage drop at the pump. But no doubt there is a spot that is slightly very slightly warm.

On a solid conductor like RG6 or 59, if you get unlucky and have a splice at the connector it can break off. But damage by the installer or user is the most common failure. Normally by the installer.
 
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