Evaluation: Cable vs. Netflix

#1
After months of watching TV through internet streaming, I've got rid of Netflix, HuluPlus and Amazon Prime Instant Video and subscribed to cable TV. I'm enjoying my TV experience far more with cable than I ever did with internet TV and - bizzarely - I find it more liberating. Which way of watching television do you prefer; illegal/legal internet streaming or cable/satellite viewing, and why? We can probably agree than in most instances cable TV costs more than streaming it so I'd be really interested to hear how people would want to watch TV if money was no object.

Thanks! Look forward to hearing your thoughts.
 

CptlA

DTVUSA Member
#2
I still have cable. The main selling point for me is the combination of tons of content paired with a DVR. I can set the DVR to record anything I want to watch, then watch it at a later date.
 

MrPogi

Moderator, , Webmaster of Cache Free TV
Staff member
#4
Without my free OTA antenna, streaming alone wouldn't cut it for me. I need live content, like news, and there's some shows I don't want to wait for.
 

O-O

DTVUSA Member
#5
Without my free OTA antenna, streaming alone wouldn't cut it for me. I need live content, like news, and there's some shows I don't want to wait for.
Speaking of not wanting to wait, I hate waiting for apps to load. Even on a Roku. If I want to watch anything on streaming TV with any app, the average time takes a minute or so. With cable or antenna TV, it's instant. Turn on the TV and it's already broadcasting.
 

Cadus

DTVUSA Member
#6
I still have cable. The main selling point for me is the combination of tons of content paired with a DVR. I can set the DVR to record anything I want to watch, then watch it at a later date.
I can't believe that I always forget about DVR. There's no DVR at my parents' place, so I've got this twisted misconception that with non-streaming comes commercials. But you can skip commercials if you've got a program recorded. Is it a hassle to have to manually skip commercials whenever they come on, or has DVR technology come to automatically edit them out, yet? Regardless, I should probably give normal TV another shot. You guys are making it sound pretty good.
 
#7
Without my free OTA antenna, streaming alone wouldn't cut it for me. I need live content, like news, and there's some shows I don't want to wait for.
??? Didn't get ya. You do know you can get Fox News, CNN, MSNBC, yadayadayada, in real time streaming over the internet, doncha?

I think I could live with streaming alone if I got a Roku box. But I'm maxed out on entertainment as it is. Plus OTA gives me security in case the whole internet crashes. Remember when it did that once? i think it was early 90's...
 
#8
Wow, there's still a lot of love for cable out there. DVR is an important factor as it makes cable a good halfway-house if you're a viewer who needs to time-shift without losing the feeling of watching TV as it goes out on air, which tends to be what happens when you stream. The 'live' dimension of cable makes a big difference too, not just for the vicarious pleasure those exciting, thrilling live broadcasts - like Clint Eastwood's high-speed train disaster of a speech broadcast live on TV from the GOP convention in 2012 - but also the still unparalleled joy of watching a program as it airs for the first time. I think it's interesting that social media rituals like 'live-tweeting' are based around the activity of watching TV shows together, suggesting that it's still important for viewers to do that as a community. I hear what you're saying about the real-time internet streaming of TV network feeds though, and I think if there was more of that for a greater range of channels it would pose a bigger threat to the uptake of cable subscriptions.
 
#9
I hear what you're saying about the real-time internet streaming of TV network feeds though, and I think if there was more of that for a greater range of channels it would pose a bigger threat to the uptake of cable subscriptions.
There's really plenty of it -- except for local TV -- no hometown news, etc. -- but the problem is $^%! getting to it! They keep changing the URLs to stay one step ahead of the copyright police, and putting out any kind of EPG or coordinated interface would take the manpower of a big corporation. No big corp. is gonna break the law just to make a few bucks, so ... temporary stalemate. Maybe in 50 years ...

Rick
 
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