Can I use an old satellite cable for my outdoor antenna?

MrPogi

Moderator, , Webmaster of Cache Free TV
Staff member
#2
Yes you can, I do it all the time. Just make sure you remove anything that looks like a splitter in the line - it's actually a switch, and your signal won't pass through it.

It would look like this:
zinwell.jpg
 

DJ Jones

DTVUSA Rookie
#3
Since the Direct TV man already got the cable work done, im going to do the same, take the dish off, and use one of the coaxial cables, because I see two, but I only think I need to use one.
 

MrPogi

Moderator, , Webmaster of Cache Free TV
Staff member
#4
Correct, you only need one. You will probably need to put a sleeve on the J-pipe dish mount after you remove the dish to mount your antenna. The J-pipe is a bit larger in diameter than the clamp on most antennas.

You will find what you need in the chain link fence section of your hardware store, it looks like this:
toprailsleeve.jpeg
Slide it inside the J-pipe half way, and secure it with 3 sturdy sheet metal screws, then clamp the antenna on the half sticking out.
IMG_1283.jpg
 

dkreichen1968

Moderator
Staff member
#6
So is a Ge 24769 Outdoor Antenna anygood, has anybody used it outside, and picked up more channels
In general I wouldn't recommend a Ge 24769 or similar antennas. That is especially true if any of your local channels broadcast in the VHF band. (Most people have at least 1.) To start out you should run a TV Fool for your location. If you post the URL for your report here, we can give you more help. Your address information will be hidden. Look at the column labeled "real." These are the actual radio frequency channels your stations broadcast on. 2-13 are VHF channels. 14-69 are UHF channels. The report will also give you the direction from which your channels are coming from and a predicted strength. Like I said before if you post the URL for your report we can give you more help.
 
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#10
This is what I received from TV Fool: http://www.tvfool.com/?option=com_wrapper&Itemid=29&q=id=e1c6a1dd86c9fd
I have learned a lot from reading the posts here. This is our first time ever tinkering with an outside antenna that our neighbor had no more use for. My husband was using the splitter from the directv and received no signal and I remembered what you said about it blocking the signal. I told him about using a different splitter we had on another TV, 5-900 and now the outside antenna connected to the smallest TV in the house is picking up about 6 channels thanks to you. We have 3 other TV's but I'll wait to see what you have to say about a new splitter. Do you think 5-1000 is enough for 4 TV's total? We are cancelling Directv because our bill escalated 3 times in one month and we didn't do anything to cause that. I'm prepared to do something different and pay the cost once and be through with it.
 
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#11
A splitter that covers 54-698 MHz is all that is actually needed. Since the most common ones in stores are rated at 5-900 or 5-1000 MHz, they more than cover the needs of OTA usage.
 

MrPogi

Moderator, , Webmaster of Cache Free TV
Staff member
#12
I think your splitter is fine. Can you tell us where your antenna is pointed? It looks like the best direction would be about 230 degrees. If you also post a photo of your antenna, we can give additional advice.
 
#13
This is our first time ever tinkering with an outside antenna that our neighbor had no more use for. ... picking up about 6 channels thanks to you.
Curious to know what kind of antenna you have and what stations you get. Which way is it pointed?

It looks like you could get a pretty nice lineup, but it would take some work.

Rick
 

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