Can you get channels by directly connecting fios to the TV?

dkreichen1968

Moderator
Staff member
#2
"I don't know, but I've been told" FiOS uses clear QAM channels, at least for locals. That may be changing, since the cable companies are encrypting all channels to prevent cable theft. If FiOS uses clear QAM, you could "share" your FiOS with your neighbors.
 

James

DTVUSA Member
#3
I should try it. I have a spare flatscreen with a coax connection. With Fios you have to rent a box anyway...just wondering, however, if I dropped the TV service and still connected my TV...what would happen.
 
#4
I should try it. I have a spare flatscreen with a coax connection. With Fios you have to rent a box anyway...just wondering, however, if I dropped the TV service and still connected my TV...what would happen.
If you still got internet from them any ClearQAM channels might keep going. It depends on whether they have to come to your house and slap on a filter, and whether the technician happens to have the correct filter in his truck that day.

There are thousands of people who get QAM just through luck like that. But it's not something you can count on for the long run. Like dkr said, they're all switching over to encrypted everything, cause the FCC says they can. That way they can charge EVERYBODY for a cable box. Wheeeeeee....!

Rick
 

MrPogi

Moderator, , Webmaster of Cache Free TV
Staff member
#5
That way they can charge EVERYBODY for a cable box. Wheeeeeee....!
Imagine if the phone company charged you for every phone in your house, or the electric company charged extra for each light bulb, outlet, or appliance in your home!

Wait, they used to do that... The phone company would only allow you to connect their equipment to their lines (All phones had to be leased from them) and early in the history of electric power, customers were charged for each light bulb that was connected - and the electric company had to send someone out to install!
 

James

DTVUSA Member
#6
I remember that phone thing. Wow. My grandfather was a contract hauler for Bell telephone. He moved bins of old phones from one place to another. Telephone booths too. I saw a lot of Bell places when I rode with him.
 

MrPogi

Moderator, , Webmaster of Cache Free TV
Staff member
#7
I wonder if we'll ever reach the point where Comcast gets so big it has to be dis-assembled like the Bell system.
 

Fringe Reception

Super Moderator, Chief Content Editor
Staff member
#8
I remember that phone thing. Wow. My grandfather was a contract hauler for Bell telephone. He moved bins of old phones from one place to another. Telephone booths too. I saw a lot of Bell places when I rode with him.
Ugh ... again, you have inspired another post, but have the statute of limitations laws passed for me? Late 1960s and early 1970s memories. LOL!

Jim
 

James

DTVUSA Member
#9
The old stuff is great...at least for those interested in looking back. Younger people simply don't realize how fast things have changed over the last 40 years. Not saying they care. But still we have experienced things that simply no longer exist. Rotary phones? What is dat? Funny how vinyl records have become cool, with new bands issuing collectable discs.
 

MrPogi

Moderator, , Webmaster of Cache Free TV
Staff member
#10
Dial phones - and when I was a kid, our phone number was BR3-5802. Funny how I can remember that but...

Um, what were we talking about again???
 

dkreichen1968

Moderator
Staff member
#11
If you still got internet from them any ClearQAM channels might keep going. It depends on whether they have to come to your house and slap on a filter, and whether the technician happens to have the correct filter in his truck that day.
FiOS doesn't work that way. The "cable system" effectively ends at the Optical Network Terminal (ONT) on the side of the house. They can shut down access to any Clear QAM channels remotely through the ONT. It's really a slick system.
 
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