Comcast Claims They Have Stopped Losing Customers

MrPogi

Moderator, , Webmaster of Cache Free TV
Staff member
#1
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Comcast says it has virtually halted the drain of cable-TV subscribers.

I don't quite believe them, read the article and see my response below.

So much for Netflix and other over-the-top Internet services quickly wiping out the cable-TV business.

Comcast Corp. said Wednesday that it had virtually arrested the drain of cable-TV subscribers in the fourth quarter, and analysts speculated that the nation's largest cable company could soon add TV customers after five years of steep and damaging losses that threatened its legacy business.
A quarterly loss of 17,000 cable-TV subscribers marked Comcast's best numbers since the first quarter of 2007, when it added 83,000 subscribers. Since then, Comcast watched more than 2.2 million TV subscribers - an amount equal to a midsize cable company that would be valued in the billions of dollars - disappear from its business.


The biggest threats over these years have been new competition from traditional landline phone companies entering the pay-TV industry and, more recently, the Internet video streamers such as Netflix and Hulu.
At the moment, Comcast seems to have battled the telephone companies to a standstill in markets where they compete head-to-head. The telephone companies also have slowed their pay-TV expansion to focus on smartphones and fast-growing wireless services.
Video consumers, meanwhile, seem to be using Internet streaming services to broaden their entertainment options rather than using them to replace cable TV.
Comcast says it has virtually halted the drain of cable-TV subscribers - Philly.com

Now, it *may* be true they've stopped losing video customers strictly by the numbers, but they hide a fact: People are more often opting for the most basic of TV services just because it's cheaper to have a bundled TV+Internet package than to have just internet alone. There are many customers who also are balking at being forced to pay for a cable box for every TV in the house, and are opting for an internet streaming solution or an antenna for all the other TV sets in the house.

Just because a customer is paying for cable TV doesn't mean they are watching cable TV. And if they ARE watching cable TV, they aren't willing to pay $5+ each a month per additional TV to watch it. While the number of *customers* remains the same, the number of cable *viewers* is declining, and the package they are getting is cheaper, and less profitable, than the 500 channel package they used to get.
 

dkreichen1968

Moderator
Staff member
#2
Originally Posted by pgwalsh on AVS Forum Colorado Springs, CO HDTV
Limited basic came with my internet package. I'm using it now because I haven't mounted an antenna yet. My house is 2 stories and I don't have a tall enough later. That aside I'm getting my internet package for a 12 month deal of $35. If I didn't get the package they wanted to charge me $60.
So it saved him $25 a month to bundle over internet alone. I have to note that I have friends who have DirecTV for TV and Comcast for internet. If they are "bundling" to get the better deal then not only are they DirecTV video customers, but also Comcast video customers. That really brings into question the validity of their video subscriber numbers. Like I've said before, if I got rid of my antenna, and signed up for "limited basic" I'd loose about half of my watchable channels.
 

Orrymain

, Blogger: Orry's Orations
#4
A subscriber is a subscriber, no matter how you look at it. Claims are often inflated and bent to make things look a certain way, so I don't accept a simple statement like this either. At the same time, I continue to say that a lot of people don't want to look at TV through internet. If you are in the key demographic, then yes, you probably do, but the reality is that there are a lot of people like me. I am not alone. I love the concept of OTA, but it's not easily obtainable for me and I want what I get even with basic cable. The non-key demographics want a TV to be a TV and not a computer. Older folks, too, are not into the new contraptions, so to speak.
 
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