Cord cutting without tbs

montevino

DTVUSA Rookie
#1
I'm a pretty advanced user, and I feel the time has come to say goodbye to Time Warner. After yet another Sunday of channel surfing with nothing on, I tried Netflix streaming and am fairly confident that between it and Hulu Plus and bit torrent, I'm covered and so is the baby.

The problem is that my wife watches a ton of TBS, and while I can't watch that much Raymond and King of Queens and Friends and even Seinfeld, she can't find anything on Netflix comparable. We're streaming everything through our Xbox 360, and I'll buy a second box and pay a monthly fee if it means the end of cable, but I don't see anything that offers TBS or comparable recent vintage popular mass market reruns. Any suggestions?
 

Aaron62

Contributor
Staff member
#2
Welcome to the forum.

Not sure if I can help you with your XBOX 360. I've got a HTPC connected to my TV which allows me to go to tbs.com and watch some of their online available shows (Seinfeld mostly). Hmm, if you don't want to go the route of getting an HTPC, you could always get a Apple TV. Not sure if you'd be able to access tbs.com directly, but iTunes does have a few shows from TBS available for purchase/rent.
 

montevino

DTVUSA Rookie
#4
Welcome to the forum.

Not sure if I can help you with your XBOX 360. I've got a HTPC connected to my TV which allows me to go to tbs.com and watch some of their online available shows (Seinfeld mostly). Hmm, if you don't want to go the route of getting an HTPC, you could always get a Apple TV. Not sure if you'd be able to access tbs.com directly, but iTunes does have a few shows from TBS available for purchase/rent.
Thanks for the welcome.

I ran the HTPC route connected to the TV for the first 3 years of my marriage, and it was wife unfriendly enough that it turned into a husband - only bit torrent machine and pushed us right into the arms of cable. I have an IR keyboard with a mouse pointer, and the little lady never took to it. If TBS had a paid Media Center subscription or an app for any streaming box, I'd be all over it. Everything on TBS is listed on Hulu as "Watch on TBS.com". There must be some streaming box with access to that content without buying each episode for 1.99 apiece.
 

MrPogi

Moderator, , Webmaster of Cache Free TV
Staff member
#7
You can add PlayOn TV to a number of devices - including Roku - to get TBS and some other channels: Supported Devices Compatible with PlayOn | PlayOn It's $4.99 a month, $39.99 annual, or $79.99 one - time fee. You need a networked windows computer to run the software to serve your device.

I'd go with the free trial... then pay for a single month. If that works out, pay the $80 and be done with it.

I'd also like to point out that several shows you mention (Raymond and King of Queens and Friends and Seinfeld) are available free with an antenna in many locations, on one of the several subchannel networks. If you can tell us what city you live in, we can tell you what channels / shows you are likely to get free - many in HD - with an antenna.
 

dkreichen1968

Moderator
Staff member
#8
I'd also like to point out that several shows you mention (Raymond and King of Queens and Friends and Seinfeld) are available free with an antenna in many locations...
This is very true. Local TV (free with an antenna) runs the dickens out of all those shows. Often they are available in HD (including future runs of friends). And, best of all it's free, you don't even need an internet connection, and it doesn't count against any possible data caps.
 

Aaron62

Contributor
Staff member
#9
This is very true. Local TV (free with an antenna) runs the dickens out of all those shows. Often they are available in HD (including future runs of friends). And, best of all it's free, you don't even need an internet connection, and it doesn't count against any possible data caps.
Here's the problem with local TV........................No DVR options. I'm very rarely home when shows air, so it's always nice being able to watch over internet where I can search what I want to watch. Oh sure, there's the http://www.dtvusaforum.com/converter-boxes-atsc-tuners/2479-dtvpal-dvr.html but take a look at that thread. People have a hard time keeping that thing running.
 

dkreichen1968

Moderator
Staff member
#10
The last generation of the DTVpal/CM-7000pal DVR was quite stable. I'm sorry to see the CM-7000pal go out of production. (I've had very few problems with my late model DTVpal DVR.) But, a HTPC armed with Windows 7 Media Center, TV tuners, and a remote gives you full DVR funtionality without having to worry about running up against a data cap. (That will be what I'll get if my pal dies.) I wish there was a current production DVR that had TVGOS enabled like the pal so it didn't need an internet connection.
 

MrPogi

Moderator, , Webmaster of Cache Free TV
Staff member
#11
The last generation of the DTVpal/CM-7000pal DVR was quite stable. I'm sorry to see the CM-7000pal go out of production. (I've had very few problems with my late model DTVpal DVR.) But, a HTPC armed with Windows 7 Media Center, TV tuners, and a remote gives you full DVR funtionality without having to worry about running up against a data cap. (That will be what I'll get if my pal dies.) I wish there was a current production DVR that had TVGOS enabled like the pal so it didn't need an internet connection.



I'm not a fan of Best buy, and I never had a TiVo, but Best Buy has been pushing a "bundle" of antenna and DVR in their weekly ads for a month now:
Long-Range Antenna & TiVo HD DVR Package $99

I know the TiVo requires a subscription for the program guide, and it's not cheap...
a monthly service fee of $19.99 a month with a one (1) year commitment (renews monthly after one year) or you may purchase a Product Lifetime Subscription for a onetime fee of $499.99 - that's a 25 month to break even vs. the monthly plan.
 

dkreichen1968

Moderator
Staff member
#12
Here are the options for OTA DVRs. TiVo ($600 with lifetime guide data), CM-7400 ($400 plus $50 a year if you want extended guide), CM-7000pal ($340 while they last), or a HTPC with Windows 7 Media Center or Myth TV ($???). So yes, there are quite a few DVR options for local OTA TV.
 

Aaron62

Contributor
Staff member
#13
Here are the options for OTA DVRs. TiVo ($600 with lifetime guide data), CM-7400 ($400 plus $50 a year if you want extended guide), CM-7000pal ($340 while they last), or a HTPC with Windows 7 Media Center or Myth TV ($???). So yes, there are quite a few DVR options for local OTA TV.
Those are 3 options for OTA DVR's, but I'd hardly call them cost effective.
 

dkreichen1968

Moderator
Staff member
#14
Those are 3 options for OTA DVR's, but I'd hardly call them cost effective.
Let's see here $65 a month for cable plus $15 a month DVR rental is $80 a month. The CM7000pal pays for itself in 4.25 months, the TiVo pays for itself in 7.5 months, the CM-7400 pays for its self in 5 months (not counting guide), and since any cord cutter worth his salt has a decent computer a SiliconDust HDHomeRun pays for its self in 1.25 months. Streaming may be nice for catching up on missed episodes. But the low quality, "buffering", and (if your ISP doesn't have them they soon will) datacaps make being able to record from a free HD source highly cost effective.
 
U

Unregistered

Guest
#17
Those are 3 options for OTA DVR's, but I'd hardly call them cost effective.
WHy not? I paid $325 including tax at Walfart in July. If my cable bill is $50 a month....it would take a little over 6 months to pay off....from there, no monthy fee for OTA HD and a HD DVR(Channel Master 7000)
 

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