coupons

Orrymain

, Blogger: Orry's Orations
#2
This has been asked numerous times and the answer is the same -- coupons were a limited time only. They no longer apply and haven't for almost a year now, I believe (or darn close to).
 

bicker

DTVUSA Member
#4
Two more years until legacy subscription television service providers are released from their commitment to continuing to offer analog service.
 

BCF68

DTVUSA Member
#5
I am amazed that this question is still getting asked. Especially when you go to the DTV website it CLEARLY states the program is over. And honestly anyone that didn't take the time to request a coupon in the 18 months the program was running isn't going to get any sympathy from me.
 

n2rj

Moderator
Staff member
#7
Two more years until legacy subscription television service providers are released from their commitment to continuing to offer analog service.
I think you mean continuing to support analog TVs. Several providers have already killed off analog service and offered DTA boxes for broadcast basic must carry signals.
 

n2rj

Moderator
Staff member
#9
Yes... "analog service" = "support analog TVs" ... without requiring any specific way that analog service would be provided.
The FCC was actually pretty specific. They stated that either the cable companies would carry must carry signals in analog or ensure that all customers had equipment to view digital must carry signals on their analog TVs.

Some cable providers opted for the latter route, with Comcast and others rolling out DTAs (which they were granted a waiver for, NOT because of analog support, but rather for the separable security requirement) and Cablevision giving free equipment for a few years, presumably until the FCC requirement was no longer in effect.

http://hraunfoss.fcc.gov/edocs_public/attachmatch/DOC-276576A1.pdf

By statute, cable operators must make local broadcasters’ primary video and program-related
material viewable by all of their subscribers. The FCC’s ruling today allows cable operators to
comply with the viewability requirement by choosing to either: (1) carry the digital signal in
analog format, or (2) carry the signal only in digital format, provided that all subscribers have the
necessary equipment to view the broadcast content.
The viewability requirements extend to
February 2012 with the Commission committing to review them during the last year of this
period in light of the state of technology and the marketplace.
In all honesty though, which cable provider is going to anger its customer base by dropping support for analog TVs? Probably none. Some are even going to keep the analog around for a while since the difference between cable and dish is that the dish needs a box no matter what. Analog cable does not. My neighbor still has analog cable and isn't changing until they force her to.
 
Last edited:

bicker

DTVUSA Member
#10
The FCC was actually pretty specific. They stated that either the cable companies would carry must carry signals in analog or ensure that all customers had equipment to view digital must carry signals on their analog TVs.
Absolutely.

Some cable providers opted for the latter route, with Comcast and others rolling out DTAs (which they were granted a waiver for, NOT because of analog support, but rather for the separable security requirement) and Cablevision giving free equipment for a few years, presumably until the FCC requirement was no longer in effect.
So Cablevision got rid of analog signals completely? Interesting. I didn't know that. I thought all the legacy providers decided to go with providing analog signals, while all the upstarts decided to go the other way.

In all honesty though, which cable provider is going to anger its customer base by dropping support for analog TVs? Probably none.
I wouldn't be so sure, and I surely wouldn't expect that none shall drop support for analog televisions. There are already cases where they've dropped basic service, where it was no longer mandated, thereby forcing all their low-margin customers to either pay the competitive rate for expanded basic or do without cable entirely. I don't see analog service being much different than basic service: Both generally serve low-margin customers, and indeed may cost more to provide than they represent additional revenue to the enterprise.

Some are even going to keep the analog around for a while since the difference between cable and dish is that the dish needs a box no matter what. Analog cable does not.
Project Calvary, along with similar efforts by other providers, proves that the service providers see no advantage whatsoever in such competitive distinctions. Lucrative customers care about "more HD channels" or "better picture quality". They don't care about analog service. A service provider making their service the best one for low-margin customers, by offering a service that often costs more money to provide than it represents in additional revenue to the enterprise, is not necessarily a smart move. Expect that analog service will be maintained longer than the deadline solely to placate local regulators, but if you're following the FCC releases each week, you'd know that dozens of towns are being reclassified each week, lifting the regulation of basic service in those towns. So by the time the deadline rolls around, there might not even been many towns left where there is any basic service regulation applicable.
 

n2rj

Moderator
Staff member
#11
Absolutely.

So Cablevision got rid of analog signals completely? Interesting. I didn't know that. I thought all the legacy providers decided to go with providing analog signals, while all the upstarts decided to go the other way.
Not in all markets, but they are doing it in some. They are also not selling any new analog service:

Cablevision to stop selling analog TV by year-end | Reuters

"A company spokesman pointed out that Cablevision is already going all-digital in some parts of New York City including parts of the Bronx and Brooklyn."
 

bicker

DTVUSA Member
#12
It isn't clear whether that article is referring to expanded basic service, or basic service. They are absolute in the headline and sound bites, but when they get into the detail they say:
The company said just five percent of its 3.1 million video customers currently receive its analog expanded basic package ...
 

n2rj

Moderator
Staff member
#13
It isn't clear whether that article is referring to expanded basic service, or basic service. They are absolute in the headline and sound bites, but when they get into the detail they say:
Based on reports from several people they are doing away with all analog.

Plus:

"A company spokesman pointed out that Cablevision is already going all-digital in some parts of New York City including parts of the Bronx and Brooklyn."

I assume that a company spokesman knows about their own network?
 

bicker

DTVUSA Member
#14
Normally that would be a bad assumption: The term "all-digital" has almost always means "all-digital for expanded basic and above". However, it is possible that Cablevision is going truly all-digital in those areas... I just would not rely on that news report referring to comments from a "company spokesman" (not even quoting the person directly) to know that because the bast majority of times they don't mean it absolutely.

However, it should be noted that New York City is where the real all-digital cable transition is starting. Several communities in the New York City area (as well as one or two in the Atlanta, Chicago and Denver areas) are indeed going truly all-digital. However, so far, the spread of this is limited to those places, and is moving slowly.
 

BCF68

DTVUSA Member
#17
In all honesty though, which cable provider is going to anger its customer base by dropping support for analog TVs? Probably none. Some are even going to keep the analog around for a while since the difference between cable and dish is that the dish needs a box no matter what. Analog cable does not. My neighbor still has analog cable and isn't changing until they force her to.
That becomes less and less of an issue. For example 2 years ago 50% of Charter's customers had digital service 50% still had analog only. Now it's 67% digital and 33% analog. So in 2012 one could deduce that between 85-90% of Charters customers will be digital. Is charter going to be concerned about ticking of 10-15 of it's customers espeically when those 10-15% bring in the LEAST amount of money?
 
Thread starter Similar threads Forum Replies Date
G DirecTV 0

Similar threads

Top