DTV Article Critic

Aaron62

Contributor
Staff member
#1
I've seen some posts lately about bad advice given in regards to the digital transition written by the press. Found a few more today that left me questioning some of their advice to people.

If you have an antenna on top of your TV or if you have an antenna on your roof, there's a few things you're gonna have to know about that antenna. It must be a VHF and UHF antenna, and if you l ive behind a big building or a big mountain, you might not get the station at all.
From here: DTV Just 11 Days Away: What's That Mean For You? - wcbstv.com

My comments: So, are they implying that an indoor UHF/VHF antenna is better than a outdoor UHF antenna? I could see a statement like this easily confusing people into thinking that they need a new antenna as long as it's a UHF/VHF antenna. What do you guys think?
 

1inxs

DTVUSA Member
#2
I love this quote from the article.
Now remember, this will only affect people who use antennas to receive their TV signal. If you get your signal from a capable company or if you get it from a satellite provider, you won't have a problem.
I've seen some posts lately about bad advice given in regards to the digital transition written by the press. Found a few more today that left me questioning some of their advice to people.



From here: DTV Just 11 Days Away: What's That Mean For You? - wcbstv.com

My comments: So, are they implying that an indoor UHF/VHF antenna is better than a outdoor UHF antenna? I could see a statement like this easily confusing people into thinking that they need a new antenna as long as it's a UHF/VHF antenna. What do you guys think?
 

Orrymain

, Blogger: Orry's Orations
#3
Hint: Go cable or satellite. Yeah, there's a message there. Confusion elicits confusion. We have endless commercials here by the cable company talking about how they can solve the problem. Yep -- subscribe!
 

Piggie

Super Moderator
#4
Hint: Go cable or satellite. Yeah, there's a message there. Confusion elicits confusion. We have endless commercials here by the cable company talking about how they can solve the problem. Yep -- subscribe!
Cox is running them here also. Making it sound so confusing, that the cable nanny state for $10 a month ends your problems forever. Then they quickly say that price for basic locals for a year without telling the cost next year.
 

Orrymain

, Blogger: Orry's Orations
#5
Comcast is more expensive -- $29 a month for one year is the deal they are offering here. Poor unsuspecting newcomers love that price. They have no clue how much that increases on month 13.
 

Jason Fritz

Administrator
Staff member
#6
I love this quote from the article.
Now remember, this will only affect people who use antennas to receive their TV signal. If you get your signal from a capable company or if you get it from a satellite provider, you won't have a problem.
Now I should be the last one to criticise for grammar or spelling mistakes because I'm sure somebody could pick my sites apart if they wanted to...

but that's just plain bad editing! Call your local capable or satellite company today. :popcorn:
 

1inxs

DTVUSA Member
#8
Now I should be the last one to criticise for grammar or spelling mistakes because I'm sure somebody could pick my sites apart if they wanted to...

but that's just plain bad editing! Call your local capable or satellite company today. :popcorn:
Haha! That's what I was referring to. How much are you paying for capable:D
 

Piggie

Super Moderator
#9
I suspect the best advice regarding antennas depends on the city. Some cities do have channels moving back to VHF Low.
Over the last 2 plus years of helping people choose an antenna, it goes even more local than city. It goes down to the address most of the time.

I answered so many antenna questions in Gainesville thread at AVS all over town, I came up with a solution. But it would not fit the entire city. Mainly because Gainesville doesn't have a central antenna farm and they have one VHF that is very very low power that only puts a 2 to 3 KW signal across most of the town and is 10 miles from town.

I got it down into quadrants. A solution for NW, one for NE, one for SE and one for SW Gainesville. Because I have answered so many questions in that town, I can pull out the list.

But even then, Gainesville has about half the people that work, shop and play in Gainesville live in a 20 mile radius outside the city. Then when I get to one of those, like Ray and I are working on in that thread at the moment, it comes down again to his address.

So my 4 quadrant solution for Gainesville only covers about half the people in the DMA.

Then I have a friend in Springfield MO market. She lives in a trailer and only 10 miles from a 20KW VHF. She can't pick it up at all. She could when they were digital on UHF, but they flash cut early back to their old VHF. If she lived in a wood frame house on the same lot, her rabbit ears would work fine.

Guess I am saying it's way more a case by case basis than town at a time.
 

bicker

DTVUSA Member
#11
I guess the question is whether it is better to say nothing or to provide guidance that applies to a substantial portion of the readers.
 

Aaron62

Contributor
Staff member
#12
I guess the question is whether it is better to say nothing or to provide guidance that applies to a substantial portion of the readers.
Yeah but does something like this

If you have an antenna on top of your TV or if you have an antenna on your roof, there's a few things you're gonna have to know about that antenna. It must be a VHF and UHF antenna, and if you l ive behind a big building or a big mountain, you might not get the station at all.
really hold up well for a substantial portion of the readers? Many of the articles I've seen do not go into enough detail about reception.
 
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Piggie

Super Moderator
#13
Which is why I cringe when I see articles giving out advice for indoor antennas when it's dependent on so many different factors!
Exactly. There few cases where prescriptions, easy answers , or pat answers apply.

If some will give me their TVFool information, I will help them the best I can, otherwise, it's starting to hit so hard and fast now on all the boards I move on.

If it doesn't get hectic here shortly, I will be surprised. Jay said there were 20 new subs here alone today. Means a lot of people lurking too here.
 

bicker

DTVUSA Member
#14
Many of the articles I've seen do not go into enough detail about reception.
I suspect the majority of the audience who doesn't already know more than the reporters would not be interested in "enough detail". They want a short, pithy description of what they need to know, custom-made for them. Unreasonable? Absolutely, but last time I checked, there is no law that requires consumers of anything be reasonable.
 

Aaron62

Contributor
Staff member
#15
I suspect the majority of the audience who doesn't already know more than the reporters would not be interested in "enough detail". They want a short, pithy description of what they need to know, custom-made for them. Unreasonable? Absolutely, but last time I checked, there is no law that requires consumers of anything be reasonable.
IMHO, that article leads someone to believe that their outdoor antenna is not going to work unless it's a UHF/VHF antenna, which you and the majority of us know that most outdoor antennas are not. "It must be a UHF/VHF antenna" is a bad statement coming from a legitimate news source.
 

Piggie

Super Moderator
#16
IMHO, that article leads someone to believe that their outdoor antenna is not going to work unless it's a UHF/VHF antenna, which you and the majority of us know that most outdoor antennas are not. "It must be a UHF/VHF antenna" is a bad statement coming from a legitimate news source.
Most of the older antenna put in the analog days were V/U

But since digital started a lot of people have taken down their old v/u and put a UHF only. Now many of them are going to peeved when they find one of their locals is cutting back to VHF.

It happened early in the Gainesville market. No one cut back to VHF, but on Jan 1, 2009 we finally have a NBC, but it's on RF 09. People had to go back and buy a VHF antenna and a UVSJ.
 

Piggie

Super Moderator
#18
The hidden transition is slithering in the grass waiting to strike.
I didn't add because it would confused my point above, it worked ok for Gainesville. Our VHF is peanut power 2 to4 KW in the direction of town. Hence most people had to buy a much bigger VHF than they needed UHF antenna. Most bought the Y5-7-13 and it was just barely adequate for them. They really needed a YA-1713, for a station 10 miles away, and LOS.
 

Aaron62

Contributor
Staff member
#19
Our VHF is peanut power 2 to4 KW in the direction of town. Hence most people had to buy a much bigger VHF than they needed UHF antenna. Most bought the Y5-7-13 and it was just barely adequate for them. They really needed a YA-1713, for a station 10 miles away, and LOS.
First of all, LOL @ peanut power. 2 to 4 KW seems like a low amount of power but I guess I'm used to reading output by UHF. Anyway, what you're saying is that a (outdoora antenna) YA-1713 is required for LOS, 10 miles away? Why would any station convert to VHF?????
 

Piggie

Super Moderator
#20
First of all, LOL @ peanut power. 2 to 4 KW seems like a low amount of power but I guess I'm used to reading output by UHF. Anyway, what you're saying is that a (outdoora antenna) YA-1713 is required for LOS, 10 miles away? Why would any station convert to VHF?????
NoBleach over in the Gainesville thread at AVS, is about 10 miles from the tower. WNBW runs a directional signal not to interfere with an analog on the channel. This means it throws a good part of it's null on it's city of license, Gainesville FL.

They transmit 4.9KW in the strongest radial. But if you plot their city of license they provide about 3 KW to the north side and 2 to the south part.

NoBleach lives 12 miles from the tower. The tower is 300 meters and about 3.8KW on his radial. He put up a Y5-7-13 and only got 70 to 80 signal at 30 ft on his end. He says it never fades and that is enough signal. But he is on the side of town closer to the station. One the east side of town one would need a YA-1713, still LOS to a roof top antenna but another 5 to 10 miles away.

They should have gone to CH29 which they had an analog license, and could have asked for digital. They have a 28 and could have put 29 in sync to close space them. However they bought a bankrupt company, the license, transmitter and antenna came with the deal. So they put it on the air.

When WFTV goes silent they are looking at filing to take out the null. Then some later year increasing power. Another problem was they overlapped a flagship NBC (WESH) with their NBC signal. They won't anymore once WESH goes silent on RF 02. Even WESH is running ads that their listeners will need to tune to WNBW (which won't work as I live in that zone). The null is pointed right at the new WESH RF11 digital because it's the same tower farm as WFTV they were protecting. So the people most effected by WESH moving sites, going low band to high band, are the ones in WNBW's null, so all of us in the area are out of luck on NBC.


So NBC also didn't want them to raise power, but now NBC wants them to raise power. It's crazy nutty stuff. But they went on the air Jan 1 at the worse of the recession we have seen so far. Ads are hard to sell. So they don't have funds to upgrade their transmitter.

If they do upgrade myself and their chief engineer think they should just go UHF and diplex their current UHF antenna on 28. Then they could take down their ch9 antenna and sell space on the tower with the feed line to it.

But until someone finds some money we are stuck with a couple of KW on RF9.

I am one of the bad radials, near the null. And put 470 watts ERP toward my house at 37 miles. Really bad reception.

This proves reality is stranger than fiction, as I could not have made up a story this crazy on my craziest days.
 
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