Question: Feasibility of Attic Mounted Antenna(s)

#1
Hello,
I have been toying with the idea on how, and where I should install an OTA antenna(s) for my house. Like most of the posts I have read, I am fed up with pay television.

Here is the TV Fool link

TV Fool

I have come up with the following combination.

Antennas Direct 91XG UHF TV Antenna
Winegard YA 1713 Prostar 1000 10 El. Hi-Band VHF TV Antenna
Preamplifed with a CM7777 (or CM7778).

My issue is, I would greatly prefer to do this in my attic, but am concerned about the reception since my attic has foil backed radiant barrier. That being said my roof pitch is rather steep, and my Chimney is another 16 feet tall. In addition the top of the Chimney has a metal cap.

From What I have read the antennas should be > 4feet from any metal. This means I would have to mount the Antennas in an area I don't feel comfortable with.

I have received some quotes to have this professionally installed but it more than doubles my cost.

Any suggestions on the Attic mount? Is it feasible to pick up all the digital channels with this (or any other) combination of antennas?
 

Fringe Reception

Super Moderator, Chief Content Editor
Staff member
#2
:welcome: Bubbaray,

You have researched your OTA antenna plan quite well. Odds are, the foil backed radient barrier will also be a television signal barrier, but its worth a try. You have three or four high-band VHF channels so your conclusion about using two antennas and a UVSJ may be correct. Since the stations are located in two different antenna farms at two different compass points, an antenna rotor is called for or two different 'sets' of antennas and an A-B switch.

If it proves necessary to install your antenna/s outdoors, you may be able to use only one antenna such as an old-style Channel Master 4228 or a Kosmic Superquad because both antennas offer fair reception on VHF. However, I did note they are 46 miles away from you.

What is the obstruction that makes almost all of your potential channels 1-edge? Are you currently receiving any OTA channels and if so, what is your current antenna setup? That information may help the group recommend the best antenna setup for you.

Jim
 
#3
I believe the obstruction is elevation to the south of me. McKinney is a bit hilly for North Texas, and I am on the back side of one of those hills. For giggles, I upped my elevation of the antenna placement to 60ft and all was LOS (Not feasible). I have an older antenna (radioshack) in my attic now that I am trying out. I received a few channels ranging from 20% to 60% in my attic. I believe this placement was not optimal, but I will work with it this weekend to see what I can do. I am also thinking about trying a Wineguard 8200U. Its very big, so I will have to see if I have the space in the attic.
 

Fringe Reception

Super Moderator, Chief Content Editor
Staff member
#7
dkreitchen,

I would not be a Forum Moderator here if I couldn't recognise a Crown Royal bag as an established principle design factor required to improve a home-brew working/functional OTA antenna!

Jim
 
#8
Well, I have scrapped the idea of trying the attic, and will move the proposed 91xg & YA 1713 to a tripod mount with a 10' mast to the roof. Should I have any concerns with these two antennas and the CM7777(8) being too powerful? See TV Fool link on first post. This Coax will be routed to a structured cabling box and then routed to the appropriate room(s) so the runs won't be very direct. And one last question, my structured cabling box has a USTEC CX amp16 distribution amp. This is marketed for CableTV. Will this work to distribute the Antenna feed?
 

FOX TV

Contributor
#9
Most evryone has it covered, but..

Well, I have scrapped the idea of trying the attic, and will move the proposed 91xg & YA 1713 to a tripod mount with a 10' mast to the roof. Should I have any concerns with these two antennas and the CM7777(8) being too powerful? See TV Fool link on first post. This Coax will be routed to a structured cabling box and then routed to the appropriate room(s) so the runs won't be very direct. And one last question, my structured cabling box has a USTEC CX amp16 distribution amp. This is marketed for CableTV. Will this work to distribute the Antenna feed?
Hello bubbaray, All of the reception advice given here should give you all you need to get the signals, but I am on a kick to make sure adequate grounding is always mentioned. It does not take a direct lightning strike to zap the sensitive chip sets in todays DTV receivers. Some diagrams do not include an antenna discharge unit, which provides a ground path for the center conductor. A grounding block only grounds the outer conductor of the coax, but a discharge unit provides a path to ground for the center conductor also. Nothing will protect your equipment from a direct strike except unplugging it during a storm, and that includes the electrical connection as well.

I use quick disconnect F type Connectors (F-Type Push-On Plug Adapter), and all of my entertainment equipment is on one grounded power strip so I can disconnect it all in a few seconds when I hear thunder, or when I am away. You can also save few watts of electricity by unplugging equipment when away. I also have Direc TV and also use the F-Type Push-On Plug Adapters on the coax from my dish. I can unplug everything quickly using these methods
 
Top