Final Converter Box Numbers Released

EscapeVelocity

Moderator, , Webmaster of EV's Antenna Blog
#1
Can I have the envelope please...

Final Converter Box Numbers Released


Via TVTechnology.com


The government’s DTV set top converter box coupon program officially ended on July 31, with that being the last day to request a $40 coupon, or to file an appeal for lost or unused coupons.

The NTIA has been in charge of processing coupon requests and released a tally of the program’s status on Aug. 5. This shows that as of that date, a total of 33,962,696 coupons were redeemed by viewers wanting to upgrade their analog television sets for receiving the digital signals now being transmitted by all full power U.S. broadcasters.


The report noted that a total of 34,757,982 households had been approved to receive coupons during the program’s lifetime, with 64,103,783 actually coupons being requested. In terms of dollars, $1,520,418,865 was committed to cover the cost of coupons distributed, with $303,581,135 remaining in the cash box to cover continuing coupon redemptions.

The coupon program went out in a blaze of glory, logging a sharp peak in activity on July 31. A total of 169,000 coupons requests were received on that date. Earlier July numbers for coupon requests ranged from a low of 26,000 to a high of 78,000 per day, or an average of about 34,000 per day.

These are preliminary figures, as the NTIA is still fulfilling last minute coupon requests, and is waiting for the last bit of dust to settle before turning out the lights for good.
 

Jason Fritz

Administrator
Staff member
#2
Only 169,000 coupons ordered on July 31? Not too bad. Kind of reflects on how well the word was spread by the FCC and broadcast stations. Thought there would be far more procrastinators waiting to order at the last minute.
 

bicker

DTVUSA Member
#3
Now comes the wait for the next fleet of converter boxes: Will converter boxes just evaporate? Or will they putter on as they are now? Or will better boxes be coming?
 

Piggie

Super Moderator
#4
Kind of reflects on how well the word was spread by the FCC and broadcast stations.
The ultimate PSA kicked in. Snow..........................
Then the nightlights went out.....................
George we better get a box dear.........
Ok, Margret..................
 

Piggie

Super Moderator
#5
Now comes the wait for the next fleet of converter boxes: Will converter boxes just evaporate? Or will they putter on as they are now? Or will better boxes be coming?
They will putter away. Next generation and it will be small if it hasn't already peaked and died are ATSC tuners built into DVRs.

I say plain jane converter boxes will die just like the UHF converters did. I don't think I saw anyone using one after about the very early 60s.

Then again, even though wasn't until 1964 the FCC required UHF tuners in new TVs, of 10 or so neighbors, I only remember 2 of them having a converter box. Then again Tampa had one of the very first UHF stations in the country and WSUN was Tampa's first TV station period on Channel 38. Our first TV made in 1954 had one built in. After I moved to Orlando in 1960, I never saw a convert box again. In Orlando we had our first UHF on Ch 24, WMFE and every one's TV I remember was UHF ready.

Compared to the ATSC transition, the TV manufacturers were a decade ahead of the deadline, instead this time waiting until forced by the FCC to start making models that were ATSC. Is this just another sign of our market driven wall street controlled economics compared to the 1950s?

Cool page to see UHF converter boxes for you'll youngins.........
http://www.geocities.com/k8zhd/uhf/index.html
 
#6
I think they should have made it more to the point.

"This is your TV. this is your TV if it needs a converter box [snow] any questions?"

So if it were a digital TV it wouldn't have snow, so the ad would be cheaper and to the point which anyone could understand.
 

Piggie

Super Moderator
#7
I think they should have made it more to the point.

"This is your TV. this is your TV if it needs a converter box [snow] any questions?"

So if it were a digital TV it wouldn't have snow, so the ad would be cheaper and to the point which anyone could understand.
Don't forget in all their brilliance many stations did soft tests on UHF, then later moved to VHF. What kind of test was that? :Cry:
 

Aaron62

Contributor
Staff member
#9
Now comes the wait for the next fleet of converter boxes: Will converter boxes just evaporate? Or will they putter on as they are now? Or will better boxes be coming?
Would definitely like to see some higher end boxes come down the pipe line. Just don't think it's going to happen. I mean, I haven't seen anything come out lately.
 
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