First New Antenna set-up

inkslinger

DTVUSA Jr. Member
#1
100_1244.jpg This is going to be my job this summer , I'm getting a DB8e for my UHF and a Clearstream 5 for my VHF both are to be mounted on 40" J mounts about 4 or 5 feet apart . My quick question do connect both J mounts together than run at the end of the roof down to my outside power service box or do I need a 4 foot or 8 foot copper rod to ground my system ? My coax grounding box will be inside a water prof box before it inters the house an grounded in the same place where my cable company did there's . Do i get a #10 solid copper wire for the ground?
 
#2
The short answer is, you should be able to connect to your house's existing ground rod, which should be connected to your electrical system and/or cable box, without a problem.

The longer answer is more complex. Some jurisdictions don't require a grounding rod on houses unless they meet certain criteria, or don't require homes built before a certain date to have them. Also, building an outdoor antenna system safely isn't as simple as just having a grounding wire and rod. Others here can offer more detailed information and there are some diagrams available on the site you can reference.
 

SWHouston

Moderator
Staff member
#3
Grounding your system, as ATL has said, won't be a problem, and probably will easiest be done at your Entertainment Center, inside the house.

However, I am concerned why you are using two Antennas, both which receive UHF. If you intend to connect them to a single receiver, you're going to have a signal interference problem.

First, go to tvfool, create your reception chart there, and paste the bold link back here, for us to help you analyze your reception issues.

https://www.tvfool.com/index.php?option=com_wrapper&Itemid=29
From the looks of your house, I'd use 25' as an installed height.
 
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inkslinger

DTVUSA Jr. Member
#4
ALT Royals When we added the power to the house I did not see any short of grounding rod connected to the house , I saw them buried the power line from the power pole to the house 4 feet down in the ground.
 

inkslinger

DTVUSA Jr. Member
#5
To what I have read the DB8e is a UHF antenna and the Clearstream 5 is a VHF antenna .
http://www.tvfool.com/?option=com_wrapper&Itemid=29&q=id=51349dcb5715fa
Grounding your system, as ATL has said, won't be a problem, and probably will easiest be done at your Entertainment Center, inside the house.

However, I am concerned why you are using two Antennas, both which receive UHF. If you intend to connect them to a single receiver, you're going to have a signal interference problem.

First, go to tvfool, create your reception chart there, and paste the bold link back here, for us to help you analyze your reception issues.

https://www.tvfool.com/index.php?option=com_wrapper&Itemid=29
From the looks of your house, I'd use 25' as an installed height.
 

Fringe Reception

Super Moderator, Chief Content Editor
Staff member
#6
:welcome: Inkslinger

The Clearstream 5 is a combination UHF-VHF antenna. For channel 12 and 13 VHF reception I would use this: http://www.mcmelectronics.com/product/STELLAR-LABS-30-2476-/30-2476 and its less than half the cost of a CS-5.

Rather than using a DB8e for UHF reception, you might be better off using a 4-bay or even a 2-bay antenna and here's why. You have two major antenna farms at 295 and 341 degrees, (only 46 degrees apart): the DB8e is very directional and it is unlikely you will be able to receive both groups of channels. However, a 2-bay raised high in the air is not very directional (comparatively) and you might receive the mother-lode. Because of its smaller wind loading, a 2-bay can go higher up, safely. Here is a 2-bay with a 60 degree beamwidth, well worth trying: https://www.antennasdirect.com/store/DB2e-Long-Range-Outdoor-Antenna.html

Join the antennas using a UVSJ (UHF-VHF-Antenna-Joiner) and not a common splitter.

Jim
 

inkslinger

DTVUSA Jr. Member
#7
So will the Deep Fringe VHF Hi Band Antenna be to big to fit on a 40" J Mount? I thought in get a 8 bay antenna would be better for getting multi-directional signals threw heavy foliage and rural installations , How about the DB8 or just go with the Xtreme Signal HDB8X 8-Bay VHF/UHF Antenna all by it self? I thaught the DB8e would had been perfect because I could aim both sides off a little to get both lines of towers ?
:welcome: Inkslinger

The Clearstream 5 is a combination UHF-VHF antenna. For channel 12 and 13 VHF reception I would use this: http://www.mcmelectronics.com/product/STELLAR-LABS-30-2476-/30-2476 and its less than half the cost of a CS-5.

Rather than using a DB8e for UHF reception, you might be better off using a 4-bay or even a 2-bay antenna and here's why. You have two major antenna farms at 295 and 341 degrees, (only 46 degrees apart): the DB8e is very directional and it is unlikely you will be able to receive both groups of channels. However, a 2-bay raised high in the air is not very directional (comparatively) and you might receive the mother-lode. Because of its smaller wind loading, a 2-bay can go higher up, safely. Here is a 2-bay with a 60 degree beamwidth, well worth trying: https://www.antennasdirect.com/store/DB2e-Long-Range-Outdoor-Antenna.html

Join the antennas using a UVSJ (UHF-VHF-Antenna-Joiner) and not a common splitter.

Jim
 

Fringe Reception

Super Moderator, Chief Content Editor
Staff member
#8
ink,

Receiving free OTA can be simple or complicated and there is no way to know in advance. In your original post, you chose the locations for two antennas ... but, what if the signals you want to receive are not there - BUT - the signals may be viable six feet to the left or ten feet forward or two feet higher?

That's the reason you 'walk' an antenna around your roof like a professional antenna installer does and scan-for-channels / rescan / rescan / rescan until you find the ideal location for an antenna: up-down-right-left-forward-backward and rescan every time you move your antenna. You will eventually find the best or 'sweet-spot' where it should be mounted.

DTV signals arrive like a stack of pancakes, where there is a strong signal, a gap, strong signal, gap and so on, based on your receiving antennas' height above ground: the trick is to find a 'sweet-spot' where the majority of the channels are at the same receiving antenna height. Look at this link about 1/3 down the page and signal layers are explained: http://www.hdtvprimer.com/ANTENNAS/siting.html This is why you must find the correct antenna height above ground.

The DB8e isn't a bad choice and it may also receive the three VHF channels (10, 12 and 13 - if I recall) so try it: you can always add a VHF-specific Yagi if necessary. You certainly do not need to buy a CS5.

Jim
 
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#9
Jim has given you very good advice. About the only thing I might add is there are no magic antennas that can see through heavy foliage. Antenna placement should be based upon where signals are found, which is not always where you want to place the antenna. If signals are indeed as strong as what the TV Fool report shows a simple rabbit ear loop antenna should work. I have reason to suspect that trees are going to present a big antenna placement problem at your location.
 

Fringe Reception

Super Moderator, Chief Content Editor
Staff member
#10
Thanks Steve (I miss the thanks button here) :thumb:

'Traditional Rabbit Ears' might work, but probably not very well in bad weather.
 
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Fringe Reception

Super Moderator, Chief Content Editor
Staff member
#12
ink,

That product is new to me and it is a gimmick regarding how OTA actually works.

Signal "strength" has little to do with receiving free OTA signals. Strong (but potentially corrupted) signals is what that 'meter' will see. It reports the opposite of what you want to accomplish.

You want to find the location where your antenna will receive a clean stream of digital data --- and signal strength has almost nothing to do with it. I receive a channel from 75 miles away (using no amplifiers) and the signal strength is almost unseen on a $3,000 Commercial Grade Sadelco Meter - only vapors! But, the data stream is perfect, which is what your tuner needs to work with. A minimal CLEAN data stream beats a noisy high-level signal every time.

Jim
 

inkslinger

DTVUSA Jr. Member
#13
Will I was using a indoor antenna with a signal booster and was picking up 43 channels {not all channels were that good to watch} I got my DB8e with a VHF kit an had to put it together just to see how good it work in the living room with my signal booster installed, will I got 58 channels pick up with good amount of channels to watch an that's just leaning on a chair by the wall next to the tv. Got to wait when the weather gets warm out side to install it on the roof, cant wait!
 

Fringe Reception

Super Moderator, Chief Content Editor
Staff member
#14
WOW! +++ 58 channels received indoors - and you're going to try it outdoors. This is an awesome review!

Please keep us updated!

Jim
 
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#15
I'm curious to know what station you receive that's farthest into the "fringe" category, especially after you put it on your roof? You've got several stations that are quite low power at 340-353 that match the signal quality I can expect at our mountain home. If, for example, you can pick up WHDT or WMUR, that gives me hope that I can pick up some channels at similar distances, strength, and with 2-edge path.
 

inkslinger

DTVUSA Jr. Member
#16
Will while watching tv this morning with the antenna next to it it didn't look good so I start to thinking , my patio door is in the other room so I move my chair with the antenna tied to it and moved it in front of the door and added the connectors to my 100 foot RG6 Quad Cable an slip it under my rug to the living room and re scanned the channel's and got 68 total . I look at the Fool TV .com and the fares was 50 miles away most channels came in at 70 - 75% strength the weaker ones 39 - 40% were pixel in an out { rainy day and cloudy } but strong channels were great. I am using a Amplify Adjustable Gain Preamplifier from Channel Master
http://www.channelmaster.com/Amplify_TV_Antenna_Preamplifier_p/cm-7777hd.htm
and it's next to my TV. So this is just a temp location until the weather gets warmer.
 

inkslinger

DTVUSA Jr. Member
#18
I put my 8 foot copper ground rod in the ground an only took under 15 min.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=F0dyf-fibzg

I did sort of like this video but instead I dug a small deep hoe and fill it up with water and work it down to waste deep, working in-out . Then I just fill up again and waited a little and took a 4lb hammer to do the rest and min's I had it in 1 inch above the ground . When I clamp my wire I might go just a little bit more .
 
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