Free TV is a Great Value to Cable or Satellite

dkreichen1968

Moderator
Staff member
#1
Comcast (Xfinity) now requires a converter box to watch Limited Basic TV service. If you want an alternative, there is free, over-the-air (OTA), digital television with nine channels in Rockford. If your TV is less than about 10 years old, an antenna may be all you need to get those channels. VHF/UHF rabbit ears may be enough. Just change your TV’s channel setting from cable to antenna. Then let your TV search for available channels. You should get channels 13, 17, 23, and 39 in high definition (HD), plus five additional, very competitively programmed, standard definition (SD) channels from those same stations. Since the signal travels straight from the station to you, it’s more reliable. Depending on your Rockford location and your antenna, you may get Madison stations including three PBS channels, additional Green Bay Packer games and more.

Free TV is simple to use but capable of an impressive 1080i HD picture and Dolby 5.1 sound with a suitable receiver. Some digital video recorders, similar to VCRs but scarcer, record OTA TV digitally with no monthly fees. You own the recorder.

Free TV viewership is increasing nationally because OTA TV delivers value. It’s hard to beat free.

— Ron Brey, Rockford
Read more: Letter: Free TV viewership increasing, better value - Rockford, IL - Rockford Register Star

Gary Shapiro of CEA is a discredited liar. He needs to go back to being a promoter of the porn industry. But wait, even that industry isn't as dishonest and low as Mr. Shaprio. They actually want to be seen as legit. Mr. Shaprio hasn't figured out that people stopped listening to his outright lies a long time ago!!!
 
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#2
I don't dispute what you say, but I'm not sure the casual reader will grasp the connection between this article and Mr. Shapiro, president of the Consumer Electronics Association. Very few people will search the forum for previous comments about Shapiro.

R.
 

dkreichen1968

Moderator
Staff member
#3
I don't dispute what you say, but I'm not sure the casual reader will grasp the connection between this article and Mr. Shapiro, president of the Consumer Electronics Association. Very few people will search the forum for previous comments about Shapiro.

R.
Well yes, your right. I was having one of my elevated moods about Mr Shapiro and his latest "OTA viewing is going down" fake survey. So, for you folks that need the connection Mr Shapiro is CEO of the Consumer Electronics Association. For some reason Mr. Shapiro decided that it was in the consumer electronics industry's best interest to kill off over the air television (that doesn't make sense to me, electronics are electronics after all, but I don't think that Mr. Shapiro is particularly smart). Since then Mr. Shapiro has been on a campaign of blatant lies meant to somehow convince enough people that OTA television is so unused that it should be eliminated. Meanwhile multichannel video subscribers are going down and television antenna sales are going through the roof, with many new companies, such as Antennas Direct and Mohu coming into the market, and the old standards such as Winegard and Channel Master producing new products.

CEA has had a close relationship with the porn industry going back to the days of the VCR. For years the porn industry integrated their annual industry promo conference with CEA's Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas. Mr. Shapiro may hate OTA television so much simply because, unlike cable and satellite services, you can't use it to broadcast porn.

In the last few years the CES has been becoming more and more irrelevant as many large companies, such as Microsoft and Apple, have simply decided to skip it.

I believe that if the membership of the Consumer Electronics Association were to get smart they would rally and fire Mr. Shapiro, since the guy has credibility of zero.
 

MrPogi

Moderator, , Webmaster of Cache Free TV
Staff member
#4
The CEA wants wireless devices more than televisions because smart phones (and other cellular data consuming devices) are as expensive as televisions, but wireless devices get replaced a lot more often. That equals more profit for the Consumer Electronics Industry. A TV may be replaced every 5-10 years, but people will get a new smart phone every 2 years - or less if they break it. TV sets are pretty much immobile and don't often get dropped in the toilet. I know I'm not running out to buy the latest greatest TV as long as the one I have is still reliable, and I have yet to drop a TV.

Another reason they are trying to get rid of free TV is that the sale of a TV set used for OTA TV does not generate any recurring monthly income for the likes of big CEA supporters like AT&T or Comcast. Lets see, $70 a month for an iPhone "unlimited" plan, plus $70 for pay TV, plus taxes, that's $3000 to $4000 over a typical 2 year contract. That's about $200,000 over a consumer's lifetime - yes, pay TV and your smart phone data plan are stealing your retirement fund!

The "spectrum shortage" isn't really about needing more spectrum for cellular data. It's about killing the free TV industry for a more profitable cable and telecom industry.

It's pretty obvious why the CEA will go to any lengths to kill or discredit free OTA TV.
 
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dkreichen1968

Moderator
Staff member
#5
It's pretty obvious why the CEA will go to any lengths to kill or discredit free OTA TV.
Well then Mr. Shapiro and the entire CEA membership, I have a few "words" to remind you of. "Thou shalt not covet." "Thou shalt not bear false witness." "Thou shalt not steal." And, then let's see... "Thou shalt not commit adultery." But, those are just outmoded rules from an unenlightened time!!! Though taking you outside the city gates and stoning you to death is probably too good of a fate for you.
 
#6
I was thinking more in terms of "the love of money..." Actually, I don't think love of money is the root of all evil, but maybe that's something that got lost in translation somewhere.

R.
 

James

DTVUSA Member
#8
before I got Fios I was considering OTA TV since I had had it with Plans that forced me to buy channels I never watched or wanted. I could not find any OTA receivers for sale. I had an early Samsung but sold it when I wet with sat for a while. I am still using an early tube JVC HD set with Fios. Pla to scrap and upgrade soon. I have multiple HD monitors in my graphics room that I sometimes use to watch Netflix. So I am used to using monitors with no decoding of OTA signals. Are the newer dedicated TVs available with a way to receive OTA HD signals?
 

James

DTVUSA Member
#10
Thanks Jim,
I will have to check that out. OTA is just one of those things I thought was dead and removed it from my many To Follow lists. Haha. I used to have an old tube TV and OTA mounted in my office. I found it was a distraction to my work. Today though I can see it being cool while grinding out image processing. Hmmm. I have a small flat-screen sitting in the corner.
 
#11
I am used to using monitors with no decoding of OTA signals. Are the newer dedicated TVs available with a way to receive OTA HD signals?
No, sorry. Generally, the TVs on the market have no way to receive OTA signals, HD or otherwise. For that you need an antenna. Once you get a good signal to the TV, there is no decoding involved.

I'm not sure FR is aware -- there are millions of people who don't know this! :doh:

R.
 
#13
All TVs have built in tuners. Monitors do not. TVs sold in this country after 2007 do not need an external tuner, but an antenna is required. If it's a TV not a monitor an external box is only required if it was built before 2007. An old TV will require an external tuner a newer TV will not. Some type of antenna is always required for OTA reception.
Steve
 
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