Frugal TV & Internet: Watch TV without Cable

dkreichen1968

Moderator
Staff member
#1
From The Article:

Use your current digital TV and an antenna to pick up the free stations in our area or if you have an older, non-digital TV you’ll need both an antenna and a digital converter box, which can be purchased inexpensively at local retailers. Pick up all the over-the-air channels free, including all the main basic channels.

If you have computer with high-speed internet connection you can access dozens of websites to watch free TV shows. All you need is a TV that has either an S-Video connection slot or an HDMI connection slot to plug in either an S-Video cable or an HDMI cable. If you have a TV that has this capability and the right cables, all you have to do is plug the cable into your TV and plug the other end of the cable into your computer. Now you can stream TV shows or media online instantly from your computer to your TV...

...Other Sources for Cheap Entertainment (movies and TV shows):

Netflix (Receive DVDs in the mail and stream video service straight to your TV)
Redbox Kiosks (Get codes to get free movie rentals)
Blockbuster Kiosks
Amazon Video on Demand
YouTube...
And, your public library!

Read More: Frugal TV & Internet: Watch TV without Cable | Richmond.com
 

Fringe Reception

Super Moderator, Chief Content Editor
Staff member
#2
And, your public library!
Libraries are probably the most forgotten source of CDs and DVDs. Beyond being able to borrow any item within its own system, the Seattle Public Library has a program that allows similar free access to adjacent Cities' Libraries - and they deliver the borrowed items to your local branch. Works for me!

Jim
 

dave73

DTVUSA Member
#3
Libraries are probably the most forgotten source of CDs and DVDs. Beyond being able to borrow any item within its own system, the Seattle Public Library has a program that allows similar free access to adjacent Cities' Libraries - and they deliver the borrowed items to your local branch. Works for me!

Jim
I know in Lake County Indiana, there are 7 public library systems, & one of them is a county wide system that serves the county, except for 6 communities with legacy library systems. The current governor of Indiana wants to eliminate the library systems that were formed prior to 1959, & only have a county wide library system in each of the 92 counties of Indiana. For the few libraries that Lake County Public Library has reciprocal borrowing agreements with, they don't let non-residents check out anything from the audio/visual department. For those with the Public Library Access Card (PLAC, which is a card that allows Indiana residents of non-resident library systems use the library systems that have no agrement with a person's local library), they can use any library system in Indiana, but materials are restricted. For those that are part of the Lowell Public Library in Lake County Indiana, as long as they have the PLAC card, they can check out anything that the Lake County public Library has in their system (& vice versa), including audio/video materials (that's because Lowell Public Library is on the same database with the county library).

I like libraries for getting certain DVD's & CD's. Sometimes, you can find out if you want to get your own copy of a movie or not by borrowing the library copy.
 

dave73

DTVUSA Member
#4
This thread is being brought up via my post on the facebook page of my local library. It has yet to add any comments, but someone who manages the facebook page of the library has too much time on his/her/their hands. Link
 
#5
Dave73 -- That would be me & I also posted here for you. I'm guessing it didn't go thru moderation, but I hope the moderator would email it to you. I would like to clarify that you can check out AV items.
 

dave73

DTVUSA Member
#7
The ones that serve the county vary in hours, with a few lower income areas having their locations closed 1 or 2 days a week. Library branches in some higher income communities outside of the main branch are open the longest , while others open later, but stay open later. Others open early, but close early. Some library systems around the country have had to close branches due to less tax money coming into their systems. In my area, tax revenue has been delayed in some communities that forced some branches to have reduced hours, & in a few cases, be closed 1 or 2 days a week.

To the unnamed person on here, I live in the library district, & not have restrictions on what I can check out (even with a Gary address).
 

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