Games on LCD.

sanju123

DTVUSA Member
#1
My son insist to play his games on our LCD TV, we have given him a set to play his games but he wants bigger screen. Should I allow him, I wanted to know if it could cause some damage to my TV set.
 
#2
Why on earth would it cause damage to your TV set? o_O

How big is the set? I mean, at a point, it's just spoiling him and I would seriously give him a kick in the butt. :p
 

acwriter

DTVUSA Member
#3
I can personally see where playing games on a big screen could be intriguing. That is actually one consideration we made when we bought ours. They had also mentioned that there might be a problem with gaming. However after much research, I have discovered that it is not really an issue. The concern is that if you leave a game paused for hours or even a show, that it will burn the image into the set. This seems to be more of an issue with plasma than with LCD. I can't really see that this would be an issue anyway. If you need to leave your game paused for several hours, just turn your television off. The game will stay paused and you will add hours of use to your television while saving power.
 
#5
My son insist to play his games on our LCD TV, we have given him a set to play his games but he wants bigger screen. Should I allow him, I wanted to know if it could cause some damage to my TV set.
Some of the older Plasma screens had problems with "burn-in" from video games and leaving DVDs paused for too long, but that's not the case for LCD screens. See: LCD Image Persistence

LCD screens are not completely immune from burn-in, and even if they do get a burn-in image, it's most likely not permanent. I've done quite a bit of research on this, and have seen only a few posts around the internet in the past 5 years for LCD screen burn-in or ghosting (partial image stuck on a screen). Newer technology TVs have overcome most of these problems, including most of the new Plasmas.
 
#6
The screen wouldn't be damaged...I can understand if an image got burned into the screen but that's only if it's on the same screen for HOURS and DAYS...like when you pause it or something. But other than that it should be fine to play on your TV set.
 

Astro

DTVUSA Jr. Member
#8
Some of the older Plasma screens had problems with "burn-in" from video games and leaving DVDs paused for too long, but that's not the case for LCD screens. See: LCD Image Persistence

LCD screens are not completely immune from burn-in, and even if they do get a burn-in image, it's most likely not permanent. I've done quite a bit of research on this, and have seen only a few posts around the internet in the past 5 years for LCD screen burn-in or ghosting (partial image stuck on a screen). Newer technology TVs have overcome most of these problems, including most of the new Plasmas.
Great info. :popcorn:
 

cherokeeflyer

DTVUSA Jr. Member
#9
Some of the older Plasma screens had problems with "burn-in" from video games and leaving DVDs paused for too long, but that's not the case for LCD screens. See: LCD Image Persistence

LCD screens are not completely immune from burn-in, and even if they do get a burn-in image, it's most likely not permanent. I've done quite a bit of research on this, and have seen only a few posts around the internet in the past 5 years for LCD screen burn-in or ghosting (partial image stuck on a screen). Newer technology TVs have overcome most of these problems, including most of the new Plasmas.
Image 'burn in', or persistence as they now like to call it, is real. It happens on computer monitor LCDs and TVs. The main reason it is less of an issue on TV's than it used to be is that most people are either viewing HD content or stretching the image to fill the entire screen (a pet peeve of mine).

If you watch primarily 4:3 TV on your LCD with black side bars, those areas will become noticeably darker in very short order.

Same with a computer monitor. If you don't use a screen saver or allow the monitor to go to sleep, before you know it, your windows 'start' button will be burned into the monitor.
 

Aries

DTVUSA Member
#10
Later LCD models don't have that problem in excess, but they still have it. It just takes far far longer for it to happen.

Also, the black bar thing, I think that's a myth since it makes no logical sense. The black has no color data in it, and thus much less light.
 
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