handheld dtv

Phillip

DTVUSA Rookie
#1
It is nice to have a new updated handheld but what about the ones who can't or just don't want to convert to something new. Did anybody thank about this before making a decision. I have a nice mobile tv and I shouldn't have to buy a upgrade because none complete thinking. Electronic stores, what happens to there merchandise did anyone think of that. Considering one focus, more than in home customers go through. How about a reasonable solution. :yell:
 
#2
The only way you can upgrade your mobile is if it is outfitted with an input connection such as a rf connector or rca connections. Even if your mobile tv does have a input, you'd still have to find a way to run the converter off of battery power. Winegard RC-DT09 converter is battery powered but, just how mobile will you be with a converter and handheld TV connected together?

Amazon has a few mobile TVs wih digital tuners for about $100.
 

bicker

DTVUSA Member
#4
It is nice to have a new updated handheld but what about the ones who can't or just don't want to convert to something new. Did anybody thank about this before making a decision.
Rest assured: Yes. That was considered, and dismissed as a consideration due to how many advantages there were, overall, to switching to digital.

I have a nice mobile tv and I shouldn't have to buy a upgrade because none complete thinking.
Well, no worries there: They did completely think this through, and decided your personal preference in this regard shouldn't trump all the benefits others perceive from the digital transition.

Electronic stores, what happens to there merchandise did anyone think of that.
Absolutely. The stores, and the manufacturers, for that matter, have known as long as the rest of us that the digital transition was coming -- really since 1996 for those who were attentive -- and surely knew since 2005 about the February 2009 date. Everyone has had more than enough time to adequately prepare, to reduce inventories of old technology, to upgrade, etc.

Considering one focus, more than in home customers go through. How about a reasonable solution. :yell:
The digital transition represents a reasonable solution. It does not satisfy everyone; it is unreasonable to expect that any solution would. By the same token, even the proponents of digital didn't get what they wanted, which was a speedy transition, in the 2000-2001 time-frame, without any messy transition period.
 

Orrymain

, Blogger: Orry's Orations
#5
You know what the problem is, though? The media here has really done a fantastic job making people aware of the change over the last six months to a year, but prior to that, there was nothing. So if you weren't 'paying attention' as someone said, you really didn't know. You never saw ads in catalogs selling handheld devices talking about the potential of their product being useless in a year. Some say progress is good. I'm not necessarily a believer in that. Even the coupons don't take into consideration low income families who don't have money to spend on a converter box, discount or not. It's really a mess. In the end, I'm not convinced it's a fair deal for everyone.
 

bicker

DTVUSA Member
#6
You know what the problem is, though? The media here has really done a fantastic job making people aware of the change over the last six months to a year, but prior to that, there was nothing. So if you weren't 'paying attention' as someone said, you really didn't know.
The media has done a great job publicizing the coming transition since March of 2008, when it became illegal to sell analog televisions without posting a prominent warning that they were soon going to become obsolete. Prior to that, the information was available -- it has been known and discussed in the media since 1996 -- but very few people would actually care about something that wasn't going to happen for a few years, so such discussions would not register with many people.

A lot of folks actively resisted internalizing the information being provided to them, even since March 2008. To wit: The delay of the digital transition from February 2009 to May 2009 was practically useless. If you look at the data about the number of homes that became prepared since February, it is a drop-in-the-bucket as compared to any similar period over the ten months prior to the February date. The fact of the matter is that a majority of the folks who were still unprepared as of the February date are not going to get themselves prepared until they actually lose service; delaying the transition did nothing to get those folks to prepare themselves. It just cost broadcasters a lot more money and cost those who did prepare themselves in a timely manner a lot of annoyance.

You never saw ads in catalogs selling handheld devices talking about the potential of their product being useless in a year.
Again, it was starting in March 2008 when our society collectively decided that those warning were deemed to be necessary.

Some say progress is good. I'm not necessarily a believer in that.
We'll have to agree to disagree about that. If we should ever again encounter a day like 9/11/01, after the improved communications for emergency services is in place, we'll be very grateful for the transition to digital. And there is no denying how much better television reception is for 98% of our people.

There is also no denying that 2% of the people are going to experience what they'll perceive as unfairness, but it isn't any more or less fair than anything else, i.e., where highways are routed, which areas are zoned industrial, where sound barriers are erected vs. not, where enterprise zones are established, etc.

Even the coupons don't take into consideration low income families who don't have money to spend on a converter box, discount or not.
To be fair, they do take that into consideration. There is a balancing act involved in all governance. The fact that we don't have socialized medicine "doesn't take into consideration low income families who don't have money to spend on" co-payments and non-covered but medically-necessary treatments. And health care is far more important than teevee.

It's really a mess.
I don't see it as being a mess at all. It is what it is, and what it is supposed to be. It isn't supposed to be what every single person might want it to be. That doesn't make it a "mess".

In the end, I'm not convinced it's a fair deal for everyone.
In a perfect world, we would all have the same opportunities in life, the same choices to choose from, the same advantages and challenges, I suppose.
 
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