Help with Reception! - I would like to watch football at my cabin

td_larson

DTVUSA Rookie
#1
Hello -

I have been trying to get fox at my cabin so I can spend my Sunday mornings watching football. I am able to get all other channels I need.

I build a basic gray-hoverman after researching the internet and was vey pleased when I build it and just set it out on my deck. I was only not receiving fox. So I tried getting it higher up. I even cut down some trees to get a clear shot and the angle of tower.

Current details -
Built a basic gray-hoverman and can be seen on the below pictures
Using 50' of RG6. I added a RCA anteanna pre-amplifier
I specifically want to receive channel 20 (4.1) FOX - (I am getting 10 to 28 and everything in between on the TV fool attachment)

Before I spend money on a commercially produced antenna - any ideas?

TV fool link:
http://www.tvfool.com/?option=com_wrapper&Itemid=29&q=id=e2cb80468d4793

IMG_3782.jpg IMG_4067.jpg
 

Fringe Reception

Super Moderator, Chief Content Editor
Staff member
#2
:welcome: td_larson

You built a good antenna for testing but you need replace the center piece using (example) Trex plastic deck lumber. The real wood 1X4 is a sponge and it may be attenuating your reception and it is likely changing the impedence of your antenna - plus it will rot. If a decent sized bird lands on the copper wire, the shape of your driven element will change dramatically and I assure you over time, gravity will cause the soft copper wire to sag.

FOX is Channel 20 (for you) and your antenna ought to receive it - assuming it is located in the correct position. A clean data stream for RF-20 may be as little as a foot higher or lower than where your antenna is currently positioned. Try moving your antenna up / down / right / left / forward / backward and rescan every time you move it. It is labor intensive but Football is worth it.

* Personal note: it took me three Summers of building antennas and doing the above 'antenna walking' and hundreds of rescans to capture the channels I wanted to receive.

Please keep us posted on your results and good luck!

Jim and the DTVUSA Staff
 

td_larson

DTVUSA Rookie
#3
Thanks for the suggestions. I never would have thought that wood would impact the reception ability of a antenna.

I will let you know how things work when I remove it
 

Fringe Reception

Super Moderator, Chief Content Editor
Staff member
#4
td,

For the mathematics behind antenna designs to work, we first assume absolutes: perfect insulators and perfect conductors. Materials that have characteristics that change on a whim (a rainy day) are unacceptable. Please keep us posted!

Jim
 

Fringe Reception

Super Moderator, Chief Content Editor
Staff member
#5
td,

For the mathematics behind antenna designs to work, we first assume absolutes: perfect insulators and perfect conductors. Materials that have characteristics that change on a whim (a rainy day) are unacceptable. Please keep us posted!

Jim
 
#6
I wanted to provide a update. I removed the wood piece and replaced with Trex as recommended.

I had spend a lot of time this summer/fall moving the antenna around including up and down with no improvements. Then 1 random day (It was a very clear day) and I got FOX. But lost the signal the next day. I did not rescan so at least FOX was a channel I could turn to.



THEN after a snow fall I now have no problem picking up FOX and the other channels even come in at a higher level.

Here are some pictures of the antenna.

I'll leave it up to you to figure out how the snow helps.

Thanks for the suggestions before

IMG_4555.jpg IMG_4556.jpg
 

Fringe Reception

Super Moderator, Chief Content Editor
Staff member
#7
td,

As you have discovered, RF energy can behave in unpredictable ways. It is likely that the snow coverage is dampening a reflected signal from somewhere and now you are receiving a 'cleaner' stream of data from channel 20 which your tuner can (now) decipher. I experience a similar effect every Autumn when the leaves drop off of the trees: I lose the reception of three channels (9 total, including sub-channels) but in Spring the leaves return and so do my missing channels.

To establish channel 20 year-round, I would build a 'cut-to-channel' Yagi antenna. The more elements it has, causes a narrower focus and a higher ability to reject reflected signals present at its sides. Take a look at the photo albums in my profile here. My Project 35 Yagi is closest to what you need but my Project 38 and 48 antennas show advanced building techniques. If you're interested, I'm happy to continue with construction suggestions. Its worth a try.

Thank you for updating us and sharing your cabin post card photo. Happy New Year!

Jim
 
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