Question: How to receive a local VHF station?

mprez333

DTVUSA Rookie
#1
Hey guys. I have been floating around the forums for awhile now, but have to go ahead and check with the experts to see if I can get an answer to my question. I currently am enjoying all the benefits of OTA television, but I am struggling with one drawback. I cannot, for the life of me, consistently get one local channel (my NBC affiliate WBIR). I get it perfectly at times, then at other times the signal is weak enough that the TV shows nothing at all and a channel scan doesn't detect WBIR. I would say I get the channel 60% of the time, most often in the evening (thankfully). Here are the details:

First and foremost, my TV Fool report: TV Fool Report.

Second, I am using a Winegard FV-30BB mounted on a pole approximately 6-8' above ground next to my home. It is connected via RG6 cable. The channel I am trying to get more clearly is WBIR-DT. Everything else seems to be coming in great with no real issues.

I have no issue with changing antennas if need be, but obviously the less it costs me to remedy the problem the better...particularly in the wife approval department.

Thank you all for your help! I really appreciate it.
 
#3
. . . . Or could be some electronic interference in or around the house like amplified spekers or a computer. I had some multimedia speakers hooked to my TV & when turned on would wipe out channel 12, even with the antenna 75 feet away on the roof.
 

Fringe Reception

Super Moderator, Chief Content Editor
Staff member
#4
:welcome: mprez333!

WBIR-10 may be overloading your tuner with too much signal, or it may be bouncing around your neighborhood and arriving to your antenna from more than one direction, thus confusing your tuner.

I suggest you move your antenna, right/left/up/down and note the changes in that station's reception. Yes, you have to pay attention to the other channels you are receiving, but if you rescan (over and over and over) while you are doing this, you just might collect other channels as well!

Jim
 

mprez333

DTVUSA Rookie
#5
:welcome: mprez333!

WBIR-10 may be overloading your tuner with too much signal, or it may be bouncing around your neighborhood and arriving to your antenna from more than one direction, thus confusing your tuner.

I suggest you move your antenna, right/left/up/down and note the changes in that station's reception. Yes, you have to pay attention to the other channels you are receiving, but if you rescan (over and over and over) while you are doing this, you just might collect other channels as well!

Jim
Thank you all for the responses and the welcome! I won't be able to try anything today as I have some plans for college football games and messing with my clear CBS affiliate could be a day ruiner, but I will definitely try these suggestions out later. I know originally, when my antenna was placed approximately 5-6' to the left, the only channel I got consistently was WBIR. Admittedly, however, I was so concerned with trying to get other channel signals that I didn't leave the antenna in that location long so I can't speak for whether it experienced the same issues. Moving the location left or right is more of an issue than up or down for me. This is because it is located on a mast inside my fence and the gate is approximately 1-2' to the left of the mast's current location. I have to keep access to that gate for mowing purposes. Other than that, I can move things around a bit.

You all do think my current antenna (the Winegard FV-30BB) is sufficient for my purposes? I'm not concerned with pulling in any other stations beyond my local major network affiliates (ABC, CBS, FOX, NBC, PBS). The CW is a bonus, I guess for when my daughter gets old enough for its programming haha, but no other networks concern me much.
 

Fringe Reception

Super Moderator, Chief Content Editor
Staff member
#6
Mprez,

The "ideal' length for the driven element on a channel 10 antenna is about 29". The horizontal 'bars' on your Winegard antenna are 20.57" long. I wonder what would happen if you were to get some tubing that could slide over the existing elements to lengthen them?

Another thought would be to raise your antenna. You can use chain link fence (tubing) sections, which are pretty cheap compared to "antenna mast" at Fry's or Radio Shack. They are galvanized and have tapered ends so they can be 'plugged' into each other.

If you are limited to the low height, I suggest trying a 4-bay or better yet, an 8-bay antenna like a Channel Master HD-4228.

Jim
 
Top