howdy...n00b help question..

MacDaddy

DTVUSA Rookie
#1
Im ditching DirecTv and going OTA...

heres my TVFool report....any antenna recommendations? Theres so many variations and since this mis my first foray into this, I'm kinda lost. I would like to use a Jpole on the side of the house, but not concrete if i need something else i can def change the mounting options...

TV Fool

Thanks guys/gals any and all help is greatly appreciated...!!

MD
 
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MrPogi

Moderator, , Webmaster of Cache Free TV
Staff member
#2
Please re-do your TVfool report at a greater height, it's at ground level. Do it as high as you think you can mount your antenna.
Looks like you will need an antenna that gets both UHF and VHF-hi, but we need a better TVfool first.
 

MacDaddy

DTVUSA Rookie
#3
Thank you MrPogi, I didn't realize I had left it at ground level...I have updated the report to reflect a 15ft ceiling...
any higher the nighbors will start voicing "concerns"...

thanks!!
 

Tim58hsv

DTVUSA Member
#4
Good news is that you can probably ignore the low band VHF channels (2-6) since there doesn't appear to be anything much on them so a high band VHF (channels 7-13) antenna such as the Antennacraft Y10-7-13 should suffice for those channels and a 4 or 8 bay UHF antenna should get everything else.
 
#5
I tend to agree. I spent sometime with the TV fool report, and then took a look at what's on those channels over on rabbitears.info. I'd suggest a VHF antenna aimed at 338 degrees and a UHF antenna aimed at 273 degrees combined with a UVSJ. I really don't see away to get by with a simple single antenna if you want ABC, NBC, and CBS. The smallest lowest cost VHF antenna I can suggest is the Antennacraft Y5-7-13. On the UHF side there are quite a few more options. Here are some links to about as compact and low cost as I could suggest.
AntennaCraft Highband VHF Yagi TV Antenna Channels 7-13(Y5-7-13) from Solid Signal
Stellar Labs HDTV 60 Mile Fringe Yagi Television Antenna | 30-2155 (302155) | Stellar Labs
Pico Macom UVSJ UHF VHF Band Separator/Combiner for Antenna (UVSJ) from Solid Signal
I did suggest a small UHF yagi instead of the 4bay, but they should be about equal and the signals from the 273 degree direction are predicted to be quite strong.
Steve
 

Fringe Reception

Super Moderator, Chief Content Editor
Staff member
#6
...any higher the nighbors will start voicing "concerns" ... thanks!!
MacDaddy,

FYI, most local building codes allow an antenna to be raised to 20 feet above the highest point on your roof (like a chimney) which allowed 18 foot tall CB Radio antennas to be used without a building code violation. Secondly, the Federal Government makes it clear that you are allowed to have an outdoor TV antenna, regardless of HOA restrictions. Read this link: Installing Consumer-Owned Antennas and Satellite Dishes | FCC.gov

So, if you are concerned about neighbor complaints of an outdoor antenna, relax because Uncle Sam backs you!

Jim
 

MacDaddy

DTVUSA Rookie
#7
Awesome info! Thank you very much, I did not know Sammy would have my back on this one..I'm definitely going to maybe raise it a few feet to get the max
reception I can.

Regarding the Pico Macom combiner, since it's going to two tv's, would I need this one to combine plus a splitter to reach both tv's?

Thank you once gain, this forum is great!

Edit: any thoughts on this one since each "side" can be oriented to diff locations?

http://www.amazon.com/Xtreme-Signal...754&sr=8-1&keywords=Xtreme+Signal+HDB8X+8-Bay
 
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#8
You have both High band VHF signals, and UHF signals that need to be received. The antenna requirements for high VHF and UHF are entirely different. The HDB8X is a UHF antenna that might in some circumstances might receive strong VHF signals. The VHF signals you need to receive are not real strong, and are likely to require a dedicated High VHF antenna pointed toward them. I took the smallest cheapest approach that I think will work in your situation. I do agree with Tim the Antennacraft Y10-7-13 would be even better. If I had seen an easier cheaper approach, or one antenna solution I would have suggested it.
The UHF/VHF combiner is a totally different device then a splitter needed for 2 televisions. First establish good signal to one television using as short of coax run as possible then split. Try to take your time learn it's not real difficult. The J-pole on the house might not be in the right location. Try not to shoot through a bunch of trees or buildings that can kill signals.
Steve
 

Fringe Reception

Super Moderator, Chief Content Editor
Staff member
#9
Awesome info! Thank you very much, I did not know Sammy would have my back on this one..I'm definitely going to maybe raise it a few feet to get the max
reception I can.]
MacDaddy,

Fact: the TV signals you want to receive may NOT be "way higher in the air" but they may be as little as six inches above your current antenna position. All I can tell you is that is how it works for many people, including myself. Higher antenna height is not always better, but it 'usually' is.

Receiving Digital Television signals can be achieved best (dependible) by lots of experimentation at different antenna heights and different roof locations and finding the signal 'hot-spots' are well worth the time and effort.

Best luck!

Jim and our staff.
 
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