I have read up about grounding but still unclear, help

#1
I am installing two ClearStream 2V antennas on my roof. One is for the living room one is at the back of the house for one of the bedrooms. I have been reading up about how to properly ground the mast but i am still unclear on how to do it and what type to wire to use.

For the front room there is a ground rod where the cable tv and phone lines were grounded. This is where i was going to ground the coaxial cable but i still need to ground the mast. I was going to sink a separate ground rod and run a cable over the roof edge and ground it that way (cable would be about 20 foot long). Then i read that that it needs to be wired to the electrical box for it to be a proper ground. I could run it across the roof to the back of the house where the electric meter is but that is going to take 40 foot of cable.

I had planned on using #8 solid THHN wire for a ground. But when i got to my home improvement store all they sold for outdoor use was stranded THHN. They sold spools of solid THHN #10 so i bought that but then when i read he spool it said it was for indoor use. So now i have no idea what i am doing and what thickness or type of wire i should even buy. Is #10 thick enough for 40 feet to the electric box? My house has quite a bit of overhang and i know you cant put sharp bends in ground wire so i am just going to let it dangle instead of trying to wrap it under the eave. Should i be using stranded or solid and what gauge and does it really need to be outdoor rated since its just a ground wire?
 

SWHouston

Moderator
Staff member
#2
You do not apparently have a "Mast", which is a metal pole that touches the earth, and supports your Antenna.
In your case, I wouldn't ground either Antenna. You're not required to, nor will it be of any value, unless you have a Static Electrical buildup, on one or the other of your Antennas. The Shield of the Coaxial Cable you're using, probably will be sufficient to avoid any static.

Just hook the coax up, do a scan, and enjoy.
 
G

Guest

Guest
#3
You do not apparently have a "Mast", which is a metal pole that touches the earth, and supports your Antenna.
In your case, I wouldn't ground either Antenna. You're not required to, nor will it be of any value, unless you have a Static Electrical buildup, on one or the other of your Antennas. The Shield of the Coaxial Cable you're using, probably will be sufficient to avoid any static.

Just hook the coax up, do a scan, and enjoy.
Oh really???? Thats great news because i have been wondering how i was going to rout wires across my roof and down to my electrical meter. I thought J poles counted as a mast and were kind of a lightning rod of sorts and needed to be grounded? I am not worried about code i live in a small town and im not bothered by code nazi's i just don't want my house burning to the ground.
 
#4
Oh really???? Thats great news because i have been wondering how i was going to rout wires across my roof and down to my electrical meter. I thought J poles counted as a mast and were kind of a lightning rod of sorts and needed to be grounded? I am not worried about code i live in a small town and im not bothered by code nazi's i just don't want my house burning to the ground.
I guess i got logged out, i didn't even know i could post as a guest.
 

SWHouston

Moderator
Staff member
#5
Not to worry.
J-Mounts don't present a very good source for a lightning strike.
The thought being...
If you just rely on the ground provided via the shield in the Coax, you reduce the "attractiveness".
Also, it's very dangerous to run a (jacketed/bare) wire across any flammable (shingles/trim) for a ground*.
The proper way is to run your ground wire through an ungrounded tube like metal conduit.
Should then, a direct strike happen, the molten metal from the ground wire, is contained, and separated from your house.

FYI: There are three "threats" from lightening.

A direct strike.
There's nothing you can do to prevent damage, only limit it.
A near strike.
Not on your electrical source, causing EMF, which may cause damage to your receivers.
A distant strike.
On your electrical source, causing a surge. This can be limited/eliminated by having good Surge Protection.

* = Example of shielded ground wire:

 
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