I want to hook up OTA TV.Can I use my old Direct TV dish for an antenna?

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gvircig

Guest
#21
I just purchased a Winegard FreeVision FV-30BB HDTV Antenna. With my TVFOOL report, can you tell me if I will be able to pick up the channels in the green, yellow and red sections with the one antenna, and, if so, which direction should I try to point my antenna?
TV Fool
 
#22
I am thinking of cutting my directtv. CBS is notorious for bad reception in the NW subs of Chicago. What outdooor antenna would you suggest? I plan on using my directtv mount on the house and there are lots of trees in the area. Here is my tvfool report:
TV Fool
 

dkreichen1968

Moderator
Staff member
#23
I am thinking of cutting my directtv. CBS is notorious for bad reception in the NW subs of Chicago. What outdooor antenna would you suggest? I plan on using my directtv mount on the house and there are lots of trees in the area. Here is my tvfool report:
TV Fool
The issue with CBS on RF12 is being on VHF-high it needs a larger antenna and doesn't penetrate walls as well as the UHF stations. With that being said, a small to medium sized VHF/UHF combo antenna like a Channel Master CM-2018 or a Winegard HD7694P should work very well and be able to drive multiple TVs with no problems. The only real issue is that I know some of our posters from the Chicago area like programming on WOCK which is on RF channel 4 (VHF-low) that needs an antenna designed for VHF-low like a Antennacraft Colorstar C290.
 
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G

Guest

Guest
#24
Need advice on rooftop antenna

TV Fool

I live in a city condo. we just quit satellite and are trying to get OTA tv. In one room, we have bunny ears (not working very well) and in the other, the paper Leaf antenna, on a west facing window. Picture is pixellated, snowy, and otherwise unreliable. Since we have the satellite receiver, I wanted to see if we could somehow piggyback onto it or its exisiting cabling into the condo with a roof top antenna. Have no idea what kind to buy or if they are easy to install.
Thanks for any feedback.
 

dkreichen1968

Moderator
Staff member
#25
If your satellite mount has a good view of the south it shouldn't be too hard. I'd recomend a Winegard HD7000R pointed at a compass heading of 170 degrees magnetic. Replace any switches or splitters with splitters labeled to handle at minimum 54 -700 MHz.
 

MrPogi

Moderator, , Webmaster of Cache Free TV
Staff member
#26
TV Fool

I live in a city condo. we just quit satellite and are trying to get OTA tv. In one room, we have bunny ears (not working very well) and in the other, the paper Leaf antenna, on a west facing window. Picture is pixellated, snowy, and otherwise unreliable. Since we have the satellite receiver, I wanted to see if we could somehow piggyback onto it or its exisiting cabling into the condo with a roof top antenna. Have no idea what kind to buy or if they are easy to install.
Thanks for any feedback.
I'm betting you don't have a south facing window, and that your condo construction is blocking the signal. That is why you have such poor reception.

You really need to be able to get a clear shot to the south, and you should get a decent number of channels. Pull off that old dish and mount the antenna Dan suggested on the same post, and you should have clear reception.
 
C

ClassicGirl79

Guest
#27
Hi all,

I'm trying to help my friends cut the cable (well, satellite), and I've got a situation I haven't seen mentioned before. Their house's dish is pole mounted on the corner of their lot, maybe 4 feet off the ground. I'm assuming there was a reason or this, perhaps the trees on the other side of the house in the direction the dish points. What's your recommendation with regards to antenna placement? Do I use the "infrastructure" of the existing dish, or do we try a roof mount?

(TV Fool shows a distinct difference in their estimates according to height, but again, I feel like the dish must be where it is for a reason... mustn't it?)

Thanks for any input!
 
G

Guest

Guest
#28
Antenna recommendation

I just cancelled DirecTV and now need to receive my signals OTA. I am clueless, so I searched the web and found this thread. At the advice of dkreichen1968, I went to TV Fool and had the analysis done on my location. I was hoping to find a relatively inexpensive outdoor antenna. Inexpensive: the whole reason for ditching the dish! and outdoor because i want to use the existing dish mount and coax. It was mentioned that if i post the URL for the analysis here that you guys could help me out. Well, here goes:

TV Fool

Thanks in advance for the help. Losing the dish is going to be like getting a $70 raise!! yay!

Kyle T.
 

Fringe Reception

Super Moderator, Chief Content Editor
Staff member
#29
:welcome: Kyle,

You have a very promising antenna survey but it is complicated because the stations you can potentially receive are all around the compass. I see two solutions for you: number one is to use a combination high-band VHF/UHF Yagi-type antenna on a rotator (antenna rotor) so it can be remotely pointed at the different antenna farms.

The second option would be to install a 4-bay or 8-bay bowtie UHF antenna with its reflector screen removed, pointed toward K20KF-D, or about 134 degrees: the antenna "should" be able to receive most or all of the stations across your SW and to your NW, but a second antenna with a second coaxial cable would (likely) be needed to receive channels to your SE, and they would be controlled by a manual or remote-controlled A-B antenna switch.

I am not taking into consideration duplicated Networks or channels you may not care to receive, just two ways to capture the most channels.

Jim
 

dkreichen1968

Moderator
Staff member
#30
Kyle,

I see two different main transmitter groups with green stations. One between 319 and 332 degrees magnetic, and one at 150 degrees magnetic. Basically they are 180 degrees from each other. For that reason I'd suggest a Channel Master CM-3010 pointed at about 325 degrees magnetic. Above roof line if at all possible. It works well in the Denver market, which is another multidirectional market.
 

dkreichen1968

Moderator
Staff member
#31
Hi all,

I'm trying to help my friends cut the cable (well, satellite), and I've got a situation I haven't seen mentioned before. Their house's dish is pole mounted on the corner of their lot, maybe 4 feet off the ground. I'm assuming there was a reason or this, perhaps the trees on the other side of the house in the direction the dish points. What's your recommendation with regards to antenna placement? Do I use the "infrastructure" of the existing dish, or do we try a roof mount?

(TV Fool shows a distinct difference in their estimates according to height, but again, I feel like the dish must be where it is for a reason... mustn't it?)

Thanks for any input!
Sorry that I missed this when you first posted. Satellite dishes need a clear view of the southern sky, and can be mounted at ground level as long as they have that view. OTA antennas work best when they have a clear view of the ground based broadcast towers (or, if not, the horizon in their direction). Higher is generally always better for OTA TV antennas.
 
G

Guest

Guest
#33
Thanks!

Jim and Dan,

Thanks to both of you for the quick and informational responses! I'm going to give it a go and I'll post my results!! Thanks again!

Kyle
 
G

Guest42

Guest
#34
while we are asking

Hi, while we are on the subject of directv. I plan to cancel mine soon. I have a line coming in to the attic from a directv dish. It goes into a splitter with a green and black wire attached. This then splits to the three wired locations of my house. Can I just take the living room wire off there and use a cable extender to hook my existing rooftop antenna directly into that wire?
 

dkreichen1968

Moderator
Staff member
#35
Hi, while we are on the subject of directv. I plan to cancel mine soon. I have a line coming in to the attic from a directv dish. It goes into a splitter with a green and black wire attached. This then splits to the three wired locations of my house. Can I just take the living room wire off there and use a cable extender to hook my existing rooftop antenna directly into that wire?
The splitter needs to work with frequencies from 54-700 MHz. Sometimes splitters used in satellite system are designed to block those frequencies. I'd test using one TV and then split the signal (with an appropriate 3 way splitter). That way you can see if you need any additional amplification. Otherwise DirecTV cable (RG6) works well for OTA antennas.
 
G

Guest42

Guest
#36
Ty for response. I mean basically just unscrewing the cable end to the living room off the splitter and connecting it to the antenna cable end using one of those screw on coax extenders to do the male to male connection. I just wasn't sure what the extra wires on the splitter were and if I needed something else for the antenna. Just looking to run antenna to living room and hoping to save the trouble of running the lines down heh.
 

nbound-au

The Graveyard Shift
#37
The splitters used in pay tv satellite systems arent splitters at all... They are a multiswitch and work using a completely different mechanism...


On a related note an actual satellite splitter will pass OTA just fine
 
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Guest-Paul

Guest
#38
Happy New Year. I plan on getting rid of directv as soon as the snow melts off the roof and I can get an antenna up. Could someone please recommend an antenna.

TV Fool

I plan on using the coax that is currently being used by Directv to feed four televisions. Thanks in advance for your help!

Paul
 

dkreichen1968

Moderator
Staff member
#39
Hi Paul,

The most difficult to pick up station of the big 4 networks will be Fox on real channel 27. Both ABC and NBC are high VHF, but they are both strong. I'm sort of thinking a Winegard HD9022 aimed at 242 degrees magnetic and then worry about the VHF stations later if they don't come in.
 
G

Guest - Paul

Guest
#40
Hi Paul,

The most difficult to pick up station of the big 4 networks will be Fox on real channel 27. Both ABC and NBC are high VHF, but they are both strong. I'm sort of thinking a Winegard HD9022 aimed at 242 degrees magnetic and then worry about the VHF stations later if they don't come in.

Thanks for the quick reply! If I do have trouble with the VHF stations later, what do you recommend?
 
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