Intermittent antenna signal on channels 13 - 24

PG5

DTVUSA Rookie
#1
TV Fool: http://www.tvfool.com/?option=com_wrapper&Itemid=29&q=id=e6a4f6fac00c6b
Antenna: Mohu Leaf 30
Wiring: RG5 (10f, Included with Mohu Leaf)
Channels I'd like to Receive(RF): 19, 35, 38, 26, 8, 13, 11
My antenna is about 5ft off the ground in the center of my home and mounted on an interior wall directly behind the TV & Entertainment Center.

For some reason, I'm getting an intermittent signal on Channels 13 - 24. Unfortunately, I don't know the true signal of these channels but according to my TV, they'll go from 5 bars in the early to mid part of the day down to 1 bar in the evenings. It seems to follow that pattern pretty consistently. All the other channels I'd like to receive are getting a consistent signal. I've tried raising the antenna higher (8ft) and moving it closer to a window. This improved the signal from the stations that are further away but had no effect on the 13 - 24 channel range. These channels are so close I wouldn't think I'd have a problem. Any thoughts? Thanks for the help!
 

Fringe Reception

Super Moderator, Chief Content Editor
Staff member
#2
:welcome: PG5

You are in a 'high-energy RF' location, so its likely the UHF signals are bouncing all over your neighborhood and duplicated or tripled signals are arriving at your non-directional antenna, and those competing data streams are confusing your tuner. Secondly, your antenna is not optimal for receiving high-band VHF (real channels 8, 11 and 13). Because you are LOS (line of sight) from so many TV transmitters I am guessing its possible you are receiving high-power FM radio broadcasts from the same transmitter farms which could be confusing your tuner.

Building construction materials can block or attenuate RF signals: do you have metal siding or foil-backed insulation inside the walls? Indoor antennas can be influenced by large metal objects including fixtures such as your refrigerator, stove, clothes washer and dryer, etc. because they can reflect TV signals. If your reception issues are caused by receiving too much signal power and/or reflected signals (multipath) you could try your antenna in counter-intuitive locations such as on the floor.

Regarding high-band VHF, an old-fashioned set of Rabbit Ears can work well and in your signal saturated location, a set with a UHF loop might prove to be a superior antenna for you: http://www.newark.com/rca/ant111f/rca-basic-vhf-uhf-antenna-indoor/dp/23R8301

Other will probably chime in with their suggestions.

Jim
 

PG5

DTVUSA Rookie
#3
Thank you so much! This gives me a place to start.
I felt it was a weird range to have reception issues since it starts at the top of the VHF bands and ends at the bottom of the UHF bands. RF Channels 8, 11 & 26 come in solid and consistent but 13, 15, 19 & 24 very radically over the course of the day.

I'll give moving the antenna closer to the floor and/or the antenna you suggest a shot. Do you think a FM filter or signal attenuator would help at all?
 

Zephar

DTVUSA Jr. Member
#4
My parents live in an area with a ton of gain as well. The direction of their signals were point into trees. I ended up getting them a directional antenna pointed half way between the two areas they need to get their signals and mounted the antenna as far as I could away from the trees.

Are their any trees in the LOS of the channels your trying to get? Tree leaves can really pick up UHF. Finding so far three areas I have been at where signal was better during the day and not at night. for me has generally been trees either antenna picking up signal or overloading the antenna. So I would honestly think maybe a directional antenna may help. Maybe something like the channel master stealth up in the attic. Or as Fringe reception stated some classic rabbit ears may be the trick. Ironically they sell them at the 99 cents or lest store for 99.9 cents. (yeah technically a dollar don't get the point on that :p.) They are low quality, but work and would allow you to know if a better quality rabbit ears would be worth it or not.
 

Fringe Reception

Super Moderator, Chief Content Editor
Staff member
#5
PG5,

Sorry for the delayed response: oddly, your last post just appeared in my mailbox this morning. A $4.00 FM radio signal filter is worth trying because it might remove competing signals your tuner could be detecting which could be confusing your TV tuner. Regarding using a signal attenuator, be aware they reduce ALL incoming signals and if you are receiving any 'weak' channels, it could drop their signal levels below the level your tuner can use. On the other hand, you would be amazed how little signal 'strength' is require for your tuner to assemble perfect TV reception -- as long as the signals are 'clean' data streams.

Jim
 
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