Is Blu-ray better than DVD?

#1
We got my wife a new bluray player for Christmas -- a Samsung BDP1600. We also have a Samsung HDTV (42" LCD 1080). I hooked up the player with an HDMI cable and then we tested the new player. I used a DVD we had (Under Seige) and we went to best buy and bought the Blu-Ray version of the same movie. I actually can't see that much difference and was wondering if there is something else I need to do? Is the older movie the reason (are newer movies more noticeable in bluray?

And, does anybody have opinions on the streaming of netflix? Is it worth it? This player comes internet ready (and does work on our LAN) and can stream Netflix. The resolution doesn't seem that great. Not sure if netflix is such a great deal either. The TV also works with Blockbuster live. Any ideas on these things?

Anyway, let me know if the bluray is worth keeping or not. Maybe I just picked the wrong movie.

Thanks!
 
#2
What's the model # on the TV? Do you know if it's a 1080p or 1080i HDTV? I've seen a few subpar blu-ray movies which do not offer the best representation of what Blu-ray should look like, not sure about Under Seige though....
 

O-O

DTVUSA Member
#3
We got my wife a new bluray player for Christmas -- a Samsung BDP1600. We also have a Samsung HDTV (42" LCD 1080). I hooked up the player with an HDMI cable and then we tested the new player. I used a DVD we had (Under Seige) and we went to best buy and bought the Blu-Ray version of the same movie. I actually can't see that much difference and was wondering if there is something else I need to do? Is the older movie the reason (are newer movies more noticeable in bluray?

And, does anybody have opinions on the streaming of netflix? Is it worth it? This player comes internet ready (and does work on our LAN) and can stream Netflix. The resolution doesn't seem that great. Not sure if netflix is such a great deal either. The TV also works with Blockbuster live. Any ideas on these things?

Anyway, let me know if the bluray is worth keeping or not. Maybe I just picked the wrong movie.

Thanks!
Poor Quality Blu-Ray Discs-Reasons and how to get better - Blu-ray Forum

There's no guarantee that every movie will look great. Unfortunately.
 
#4
What's the model # on the TV? Do you know if it's a 1080p or 1080i HDTV? I've seen a few subpar blu-ray movies which do not offer the best representation of what Blu-ray should look like, not sure about Under Seige though....
The TV is a Samsung LN-T4661F and is a 1080p. Is that bad? By the way, it's a 46" TV (think I said it was 42" - sorry).

Thanks for the reply!
 
#6
Is Blu-Ray Better than DVD.

Was Beta better than VHS?

Honestly, i've had experience with Betamax Hi-Fi. VHS, S-VHS, and of course watched Blu-Ray as well as HD-DVD movies. and you know what the difference is?

$5 dollars per-movie.

seriously, i cannot see any better picture on a Blu-Ray movie than on a HD-DVD movie, on an Olevia Flat LCD HDTV set. they look and sound alike unless you have studio-skills or are a professional audiophile. otherwise, to the average consumer, it's just fanboy-ism. some think that if they buy a Apple, Inc product, Bose, or Kenmore Elite, that it's superior because it costs over $500-more. same with Blu-Ray. People have the sick mentality that if it costs more, that it's automatically better. they don't trust their eyes, they trust their wallets.

the format war still goes on, only with Blu-Ray and HD-DVD. as with any new technology, i'd wait to see how it sticks before ending up with a useless gadget and an empty wallet, i wouldn't buy something only to find out it's just LaserDisc all over again. in fact, i don't buy new anything. i still prefer VHS movies myself, esp since they are now $1 a movie.

Forget MP3 players--i 'rip' my music onto 8-tracks. seriously now, does it matter at all what form of media (tape, disc, media card, etc) the item is on when we all know that the electronics within the player is what does all the work of 'upconverting' or whatever makes the picture which ends up on your screen look so sharp?

Your DSL modem actually creates digital signals out of standard analog POTS phone lines. the same ones which used to run rotary phones. seriously, all that is digital in a media player is just the electronics. the only difference is that each player plays a disc, tape, or hard disk. i highly doubt any reasonable difference is acheived by throw-away media such as a DVD.

Video tapes have lasted more than 40 years and can remain playable and look as good as the day they were removed from their package, provided one knows how to treat them and their player with respect, but how long does a DVD last? a Blu-Ray movie, and is it a repairable medium like an 8-track or VHS/Beta Tape? nope. a throwaway disc. family memories transferred from old cassettes to CD/DVD won't last and if the tapes are dumped into the garbage the way everything else 'old' is, those memories will be lost forever.
 
Last edited:

Piggie

Super Moderator
#7
I thought the war was over between HD and Blu-Ray DVDs?

My experience is a DVD that is stamped from a die if taken car of will last a LONG time.

DVD's that are burned have a finite life. I have burned thousands of DVDs over the last 5 years and the Verbatim brand is by far the best for longevity. I haven't had one of them go bad, yet... But considering every other brand has except TDK I am guessing they all have a finite life.
 

EscapeVelocity

Moderator, , Webmaster of EV's Antenna Blog
#8
The TV is a Samsung LN-T4661F and is a 1080p. Is that bad? By the way, it's a 46" TV (think I said it was 42" - sorry).

Thanks for the reply!
That was the last of the matte screen Samsungs! Ive been looking for one or rather its smaller sibling in the used market for sometime now. The 4061.

Great set!
 

EscapeVelocity

Moderator, , Webmaster of EV's Antenna Blog
#9
Blu Ray is better than DVD, no question about it.

I however find DVD very satisfying on television sized screens, and even my 92" projector with its 854x480 DLP mirror chip.

However I do find myself wanting more resolution at that large of a screen size.

DVD is superior to most other delivery systems for 480 lines of resolution, as a medium. OTA, Cable, Satellite, and so on and so forth. See video compression.

As someone mentioned there is even variation among DVDs, as to the quality of the mastering. The amount of compression. Etc.

Look into SuperBit DVDs. Here is the Wiki on SuperBit. Which cuts out extras, special features, etc in favor of less compressed and more raw video data.

I have the 5th Element SuperBit. And while it is better, its not enormously so.

Furthermore, with DVD's, especially older pressings, the mastering stage often had lots "edge enhancement", aka sharpening, applied, which was useful on smaller CRT TVs, however its very offensive on large screens. Blu Rays avoid this problem mostly.

That should give you some ideas to start your exploration.

Hope that helps.
 
Last edited:
#10
@Piggie, once a disc is scratched, it's useless. videotape is immune to scratches which cause infuriating skipping. over 40+ years a videocassette will far outlast a dvd
 

Piggie

Super Moderator
#11
@Piggie, once a disc is scratched, it's useless. videotape is immune to scratches which cause infuriating skipping. over 40+ years a videocassette will far outlast a dvd
Yes, if one thing I will state in total agreement, the entire CD/DVD optical home storage as being forever was a total lie. (way past over played) Like I said I have put in burned CD's and DVD's I made less than 5 years ago have errors.

I started recording optical disks with a par2 correction added to the disk. It takes awhile to par2 a disk but worth it if it's that important.

Par2 is free and there are versions that run on DOS, Windows, MAC, command line and GUI Linux. Just go to PAR and PAR2 Information and Downloads Be warned don't use Par or Par1 standard. It requires the initial par index file never becomes corrupted, where as par2 can rebuild from any par2 file larger than the error. It is something like magic.
 

kicks92

DTVUSA Jr. Member
#12
Bluray is incredible. The sharpness and detail almost gives a 3D feel (not really, but almost.) I am viewing on a 73" Mits and there is a difference from DVD. The other advantage of BR is the audio if you are set up for it. TruHD and DTS enhances the viewing experience. Noticeable difference over Dolby 5.1 you get from DVD.

Last March, when I got fed up with Blockbuster, I switched to Netflix 4 movie and Bluray option and I love it. Streaming is a wonderful feature and I use it frequently. Not always the best movies available but have found some sleepers through my viewings. My Sam 1600 crapped out on me after about 5 months so I bought a Sam 1590c at Costco. BTW, their remote controls suck. I use a Harmony 880 now so I don't have to use their remote. Also have a LG Bluray 300 in my basement gym that I actually like better than the Samsung. They both stream nicely. In my home theater I route the streaming signal via an old Airport Extreme. In my gym I hard wire from my wireless Imac.

The main downside to streaming is the audio i.e. no dolby 5.1. I have learned to live with that and can play around with the Onkyo receiver to tailor the sound. When I think back 3 or 4 decades ago when I listened to everything through a single 3" TV speaker, whatever I get is a vast improvement over that.
 
Last edited:
#13
Blu-Ray is not reliable--mom's samsung blu-ray deck only plays maybe 3-out-of-5 discs. i don't understand the player's 'pickyness' at all.

sorry, not convinced. nothing can beat a good old-fashioned VCR.
 

EscapeVelocity

Moderator, , Webmaster of EV's Antenna Blog
#14
Sounds like a laser alignment problem with your unit. DVD's also have that variation. One unit will play anything you throw at it and another wont play the slightest scratch.

There is variation among models, but also within the same model.
 
#15
hers will bring up the disc menu, but she gets a red circle w/ slash if she clicks on 'Play Movie' and such a condition only happens on Blu-Ray, DVDs play fine.

when it does work, i fail to see any perceivable difference, certainly not one which justifies $5 more dollars per-movie.
 

Fringe Reception

Super Moderator, Chief Content Editor
Staff member
#17
my opinion

We had two Phillips DVD players and neither one lasted more than 16 months. We recently purchased a Sony Blue-Ray player and tonight we re-ran a movie we recently watched on the last dead Phillips. What a difference!

Running the movie on the Phillips, if you walked toward the screen the image got fuzzier or cloudier the closer you got to it, BUT, with the Sony blue-ray, the same images are perfectly clear even 3 feet away from the screen.

We're not sure if this is a Phillips VS Sony issue or a Standard VS Blue-Ray issue, but that is what we see here -- is this some form of "up-converting"?
Jim

PS: No, I have not have had recent Lasic Surgery ... but it seems as if I had!

PPS: Tomorrow night we will revisit "The World's Fastest Indian" - an excellent movie, to see if it also improves!
 
Last edited:
#18
a blu-ray disc is just a DVD albeit with more storage capacity. the 'rise' in quality you are seeing is all done by the electronics inside the player itself. IMO Blu-Ray would make a better storage medium than movie format as the disc isn't what makes the better quality; rather just upconverting. any newer DVD player can upconvert.
 

Fringe Reception

Super Moderator, Chief Content Editor
Staff member
#19
DTVuser,

Your response is not quite what I asked about but something changed here significantly. There has never been a blue-ray disk in our house ... BUT ...

We now see a far superior picture watching the same standard DVD's on the new Sony blue ray machine, compared to the two prior (dead) standard DVD Phillips units.

* A new question: I forgot to add this before because I didn't take it into concideration until now. I bought a new VERY expensive HDMI cable and we are using it with the Sony ... could this alone be the reason for the major changes we see?

Thanks in advance,
Jim
--------------------

I wrote:
We had two Phillips DVD players and neither one lasted more than 16 months. We recently purchased a Sony Blue-Ray player and tonight we re-ran a movie we recently watched on the last dead Phillips. What a difference!

Running the movie on the Phillips, if you walked toward the screen the image got fuzzier or cloudier the closer you got to it, BUT, with the Sony blue-ray, the same images are perfectly clear even 3 feet away from the screen.

We're not sure if this is a Phillips VS Sony issue or a Standard VS Blue-Ray issue, but that is what we see here -- is this some form of "up-converting"?
Jim

PS: No, I have not have had recent Lasic Surgery ... but it seems as if I had!

Jim
------------------

a blu-ray disc is just a DVD albeit with more storage capacity. the 'rise' in quality you are seeing is all done by the electronics inside the player itself. IMO Blu-Ray would make a better storage medium than movie format as the disc isn't what makes the better quality; rather just upconverting. any newer DVD player can upconvert.
 
#20
Most newer DVD players (usually called 'Upconverting' DVD players) and of course Blu-Ray can use HDMI--While a lot of older units didn't even support that or DVI. so i would guess that using HDMI and having the electronics upconverting to HDTV such as 1080i and p, could explain your quality rise--NOT the disc nor the expense of discs used for recording or movies rented or bought.

Your quality being up on regular old DVDs proves that Blu-Ray is (besides extra storage capacity for recording) no innovation at all; being that the only thing that is different is HDTV out, which any newer model DVD player is capable of. the only difference is the extra expense of discs and movies--that's not any real reason to 'upgrade' IMO

As i stated the player is what does all the work--had VCRs been made longer they probably would have a similar mode eventually.
 
Last edited:
Top