looking for an antenna for attic

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Antibelle

Guest
#1
I tried to answer all the questions from the intro sticky for my situation. I was looking at this antenna online (RCA Suburban Mini Yagi Digital Outdoor Antenna with Mast: TV & Video : Walmart.com) and then started reading about Red Blue and Violet ratings on antenaweb.org, THEN found you guys and tv fool. Sigh - internet research turns up what it usually does in these situations - the realization you're in over your head, and you better ask somebody. Please help! Thanks!

here's my tv fool run down: TV Fool


What is your primary objective (check the line applicable) :
I want as many as I can reasonably get

Main Assembly:
What kind of Terrestrial Antenna do you presently have:
None

Is the Antenna to be/or installed:
Attic

If in Attic, Roof or outside separate Mast/Pole:
How high above ground is your Antenna installed/proposed:
In the attic above a 1 story house, BUT there is a 2 story house to the south, and some rather large houses west and northwest, the areas where the most signals are coming from.

Do you have an Antenna Rotator:
/None

Are you presently using a Pre-Amplifier:
No

Interior:
How many linear Cable feet is it between your Antenna and the most far TV:
There would probably be 20 feet or so - rather small house.

How many TV sets will be/are presently being used, on this system:
only one

How many Splitters are in use in your system:
none

Are you using a Distribution Amplifier:
nope.


Additional Information:
Are you/do you plan to integrate Cable or Satellite Services with this system:
No

Is there anything else you would like to provide concerning construction, obstructions or geographical issues?
Please see above about 2 story houses, and we're also in a flight path for helicopters for our local children's hospital - read somewhere that's relevant. I'd like to put it in the attic for ease of installation, and I had a new roof put on (tore down the old antenna, arg!). We are on top of a hill, and I can see the horizon to the south from our street, but my neighbor's house blocks it from all our south facing windows. I most want to get KETS - our PBS coming from Conway, about 30 miles away to our NW - also large houses blocking that direction, as well as some hills. Definitely can't see the horizon that way. We're basically on the first hill to the west of the entire Missisippi delta, where the Quachita mountain range starts forming. East is very clear for us. Maybe that's too much information, but better than too little, right?

I also have a good sized attic.
 

Fringe Reception

Super Moderator, Chief Content Editor
Staff member
#2
Antibelle,

You have a very good chance of capturing many channels from your west and east using an attic mounted antenna. However, if you have a metal roof or foil-backed insulation in the walls, it can kill your reception. Attic antennas are also affected by HVAC ducting, steel chimney and vent pipes and other metalic signal reflectors.

I would try a 4-bay "bow-tie" antenna with its reflector screen removed. If you're handy, you could build one pretty easily using a 2 by 4 and some coathangers. The type is similar to (first photo) a Channel Master 4221 but sized like (second photo) a Kosmic SuperQuad (designed by Forum member EV).





KETS is real channel 7 (high-band VHF) and if the antenna type I mentioned earlier doesn't capture it, you could ad a VHF Yagi antenna to the system.



Jim
 
A

Antibelle

Guest
#3
Thanks Jim! I'm checking them out. Might have to get a handy friend to help me. Does EV sell directions to the SuperQuad, or is there a link to see more?
 

SWHouston

Moderator
Staff member
#4
Jim, a VERY informative post ! :thumb:

(TVFool was offline when I tried to see the report)

Antibelle,
My personal "rule of thumb" when going with an Attic install, is, seeing what your actual distance is between you and the towers, then, getting an Antenna which is capable of receiving TWICE that distance.

ie: if you're 25 miles from the stations, get a 50 mile antenna...like that.
 

Fringe Reception

Super Moderator, Chief Content Editor
Staff member
#5
Thanks Jim! I'm checking them out. Might have to get a handy friend to help me. Does EV sell directions to the SuperQuad, or is there a link to see more?
Antibelle,

I don't know if EV sells plans and I haven't seen him on the Forum recently. The important measurements are in the second photo above and the vertical phasing lines marked 'feed line crossover' in the photo should have a one inch gap. I could add a couple more photos of my Superquad if it would help.

Honestly, a 2x4, some coat hangers and some copper wire can create an attic SuperQuad that should be adequate for your location: no guarantees about your RF-7, however.

Jim
 

dkreichen1968

Moderator
Staff member
#6
I'd think that a backless Gray-Hoverman would work well in your area, since the main station groupings are 180 degrees from each other.





My build above uses 1/4" copper tubing for the elements and 1/2" PVC Ts for the insulators.
 
#7
I'd think that a backless Gray-Hoverman would work well in your area, since the main station groupings are 180 degrees from each other.
If you don't want to build it, you can get one from Summit Source for about $40 incl. S&H.
AntennaCraft 4 Bay UHF Antenna HDTV Outdoor TV Aerial for Local Off-Air Digital HD Four Bay Signal Fringe Reception, LIGHT GREEN ZONE, Part # G1483

Almost the same dimensions as Snappy Dan's. I understand those rod reflectors fold down easily, for your 180 degree situation.

I found this in an old post from EV:

EV said:
The Hoverman is a fantastic performer ... Its fantastic gain of around 12 dBd is where it shines. It also gives you a little something on VHF High, though I wouldnt call it a VHF High antenna, more than any of the 4 Bay Bowtie antennas ... One attribute that can be useful on this antenna, is its relatively low F/B ratio of around 6 dB, if you have transmissions from opposite directions. Aim it at the weaker set, and catch the stronger transmissions off the backside."
Since an excellent 4 bay bow-tie gets 12.85 dBd max, with a F/B ratio of 18(!) dB, the math seems to suggest a Hoverman should work better than a bow-tie when reflectors are out of the picture.

You could try it all three ways -- without reflector, or with the reflector, pointed either northwest or southeast -- to see which works best for you.

Rick
 
Last edited:
A

Antibelle

Guest
#9
Oh great, thanks, Rick. I'll try that if my DIY efforts go awry. Thanks for all the replys, everyone. I'll post an update / pics once I get something done. I'm realizing all these giant old oak trees might cause problems all around. We'll see. Can't be worse than no channels at all!
 

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