Lost Charter for the weekend...storms, but made 2 antennas..homemade style.

rt1

DTVUSA Member
#1
I made a antenna out of wire and a split open pop can and was pulling about 20 channels.
I was pulling stations from Ft. Wayne indiana from Kalamazoo....that's about 117 miles....i was astonished to be honest.
i was able to get my local NBC channel 8.1...i think it's VHF isn't it ?


The other antenna which was the first one i make two aluminum foil ears about 2 feet long if not a touch longer. I hooked up wires to them then connect them to the tv antenna coax spot, just bare wire stuffed in there. IT worked great...got about 20 channels.
i can't get vhf on this setup....any suggestions

My kids were astonished, they thought it was cool actually.
Atleast i was able to see U-M lose the ND and Mich. State play some football.
 

Lestrade

DTVUSA Member
#2
I made a antenna out of wire and a split open pop can and was pulling about 20 channels.
I was pulling stations from Ft. Wayne indiana from Kalamazoo....that's about 117 miles....i was astonished to be honest.
i was able to get my local NBC channel 8.1...i think it's VHF isn't it ?


The other antenna which was the first one i make two aluminum foil ears about 2 feet long if not a touch longer. I hooked up wires to them then connect them to the tv antenna coax spot, just bare wire stuffed in there. IT worked great...got about 20 channels.
i can't get vhf on this setup....any suggestions

My kids were astonished, they thought it was cool actually.
Atleast i was able to see U-M lose the ND and Mich. State play some football.

Wow, way to go!!! It looks like somebody has got a talent for making do with what comes up!!! I would never have thought of using wire and pop can!!!
 

rt1

DTVUSA Member
#3
Wow, way to go!!! It looks like somebody has got a talent for making do with what comes up!!! I would never have thought of using wire and pop can!!!
It works strangley well.
just split the can open down the middle, cut the top round piece off (the drinking part)
i drilled two small holes on each side of the split, bottom of the can is where i drilled holes, and used one bolt, 2 washers and a nut to secure the wire down (18 guage insulated). A Y split. Then at the top of the can i drilled two holes on each side and took my 18 gauge wire and made a hanger with it so i can have the pop can antenna supported up on the tv wall hanger.

I did find some video's on this on you tube so I can't take all the credit on the pop can.

My next one i'm going to to use 2 pop cans and have them at a wider distance and try to improvise some ears on each can or a bar going accross the top to each can. Maybe that will give me better vhf.

i would love to hear some info or other ideas from others.
 
#6
This is the best page I found on the subject of beer can TV antennas.
DIY TV Antenna: How to build TV antenna from a beer can. DIY, free TV
The pop can dipole. I measured a 12 oz pop can at just under 5 inches about 4 7/8". By the standard old formula the two can dipole would be resonant at about channel 31. I know that formula only works for small wire. Too much work cutting cans in half. I'd just use two cans. Connect each wire from your balun (if you have one) to a can, by what ever method makes good enough connection. Aluminum is difficult to solder to. The direct connect coax method of construction will be narrower band width. Get out the duck tape. The photos in the link explain it better then I can.
I've never built an aluminum can TV antenna. In good signal areas it should work. Probably better than some of the things I've seen sold as HDTV antennas.
Steve
 
#7
The burning question is this: Suppose you have a TV but you got laid off, out of money, and the cable company cut you off! No money. No soldering iron. No balun. Third world country stuff. We should have an instruction page with illustrations: "How to make an antenna in under 24 hours that pulls in as many stations as possible."
 
#8
In late 2010 I crashed my life pretty good. As best I can tell going through records spent about ten days in a coma. I have not made a quick recovery, nor have I gotten back to living on my own. In January of 2012 the local broadcast consortium pulled their signals from Dish network. The only source of TV in the household where I now reside. I suggested the purchase of an antenna to continue receiving local broadcast, and was quickly told no. I had no money, and little say in the matter, but I did find a junk box of wires, coax, and such in a storage area. There is a south facing window close to the TV. The Dish receiver has the OTA module. I knew that most of the local broadcast signals here are VHF. Without the approval of others I cut a full wave loop for 174 mhz out of a scrap of wire, and other junk box parts taped it to the window. Even I was skeptical on that first channel scan, but it worked. We were without local TV channels for about four days. From there I was given a bit more freedom, junk, parts, and tools to work with. In the last two years I have been able to get out, and help others receive local television broadcast signals. Often times working with scraps of wire, wood, PVC, old TVs, and converter boxes. In this part of the country some are happy to get 5 channels from the 3 full power VHF broadcast transmitters in this county. I've gotten a lot of experience working with salvaged parts, converter boxes, old coax, and baluns. Slowly learning what works, and what doesn't.
Steve
 
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G

Guest

Guest
#9
This is the best page I found on the subject of beer can TV antennas.
DIY TV Antenna: How to build TV antenna from a beer can. DIY, free TV
The pop can dipole. I measured a 12 oz pop can at just under 5 inches about 4 7/8". By the standard old formula the two can dipole would be resonant at about channel 31. I know that formula only works for small wire. Too much work cutting cans in half. I'd just use two cans. Connect each wire from your balun (if you have one) to a can, by what ever method makes good enough connection. Aluminum is difficult to solder to. The direct connect coax method of construction will be narrower band width. Get out the duck tape. The photos in the link explain it better then I can.
I've never built an aluminum can TV antenna. In good signal areas it should work. Probably better than some of the things I've seen sold as HDTV antennas.
Steve
This is one of the video's that i watched after i built mine. Trust me guys this was easy to cut a can open and split it down the middle. Basic scissors can do it. Poke small holes in the bottom end of each split side and thread your wire through. What i did was a bolt- 2-washers- nut system on the wire to hold it secure...snug it up don't overtighten.
Seriously it's hardly any effort and should take someone 6-8 minutes to make.
I did watch a video before i built mine, it gave me a good idea of how i wanted to do mine.
Still working great today, i watched nbc the today show this morning. I hooked it up to our bedroom tv instead of PAYING CHARTER $10 per month for the box so i can watch reg. cable.....Screw that and charter!
 
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