Mobile DTV Availability

Jim1348

DTVUSA Member
#1
I did a Google search this afternoon to see if anything new popped up for Mobile DTV. I was somewhat underwhelmed to see that not much showed up. It looks as if the RCA Mobile DTVs are being sold via the web exclusively. While that is certainly there choice, I happen to think that they would probably sell better if they are available at your local Best Buy stores, etc. I certainly don't know much about retailing, but is that typical to take that long to show up at brick and mortar stores?
 
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dkreichen1968

Moderator
Staff member
#2
RCA has to convince the stores that they can make money selling them. Since mobile is still only up in limited markets it is hard for stores to sell receivers for a nonexistent service. Later this year, when more markets get mobile I'd expect limited stores to start selling them.
 

Fringe Reception

Super Moderator, Chief Content Editor
Staff member
#3
... Later this year, when more markets get mobile I'd expect limited stores to start selling them.

If that's the case they have missed the outdoor (sales) season. I think the most likely to purchase the first mobile TVs will do it on impulse: young people who will take them camping, hiking and to the beach. The second round of purchasers are the ones who will wait at a bus stop and watch the news. Merry Christmas.

Jim
 

Jim1348

DTVUSA Member
#4
Jim In Seattle, you make some good points. I had been thinking about the folks that wanted these as a backup when they lose power due to severe weather. The other market might be the football fans that would bring these along tailgating. Realistically, as you alluded to, if they can get ready in time for Black Friday, that might be a good target time frame. Considering how technology seems to be towards an all-in-one device, like smartphones and tablets, the Mobile DTV is sort of a "one trick pony" and may have a real uphill battle. Maybe as tough as HD Radio has had it. In some respects it is similar to HD Radio. I recall people saying they would wait on buying an HD Radio until more broadcasters were available in their area. In turn, the broadcasters were stating they were holding off until they knew the demand was there!
 

Fringe Reception

Super Moderator, Chief Content Editor
Staff member
#5
Jim,

I am still hoping for Mobile DTV sets to appear on the market but a couple months ago I broke down and bought a Haier 7" battery powered DTV with a standard ATSC tuner. I found it on Craigslist across town for a song, because the owner said it would only receive 2 channels. In reality, the seller didn't know how to make it work.

I wanted to test it before I bought it so I asked him for a paperclip, bent it straight and inserted in the antenna fitting and then initiated a new scan to detect channels. You should have seen the look on his face when the 7th channel was detected!

Jim
 

Jim1348

DTVUSA Member
#6
Car Mobile DTV Products May Need Internet

I guess this explains a few things, but also brings up a few more questions!

http://ceoutlook.com/car-mobile-dtv-...need-internet/

"Top broadcasters are now requesting that Mobile DTV products–even car products–include Internet capability, a development which cause more delays for this new technology.

Mobile DTV may need Internet to monitor viewersMobile DTV permits free digital over-the-air TV even while in motion, and even at high speeds, as in a car.

Suppliers say some major retailers are beginning to ask for Mobile DTV products but now there is a new bump in the road to market.

“Many of the broadcasters would like to have an Internet back channel….a return path of some sort, primarily for the purposes of looking at ratings…They want to know what people are watching,” said Dave Arland a spokesman for the Open Mobile Video Coalition (OMVC) that is promoting Mobile DTV.

Car TVs, tablets, and smartphones with Mobile DTV may be required by broadcasters to include some form of Internet connection or it may be “suggested” that products include this connection. Or there may be a tiered structure where a lower tier of products don’t offer Internet, but these will receive only a limited number of Mobile DTV channels.

The OMVC said that new device profiles are being drawn up for Mobile DTV equipment makers, and these will be made public at the end of June.

In general terms, the larger broadcasters want to require an Internet back channel, while smaller broadcasters see the Internet as an option. Some broadcasters, including Fox, will not permit any device to receive their Mobile DTV channels unless it has an Internet back channel, said several industry members.

A car Mobile DTV device would not need an always-on connection to the Internet. It could connect by WiFi periodically or it could have a home dock where it connected to the Internet periodically.

Some or many broadcasters are expected to encrypt their Mobile DTV broadcasts so that the Mobile DTV-ready products without Internet capability will not receive the encrypted signal. It may leave the tier of products with only a small channel package.

“In the end there may be 20 to 40 channels in any market and you may get 3 of those are that are totally non-encrypted,” said a supplier.

The Internet issue, he said, has sent his company “back to the drawing board” on Mobile DTV and so it may “skip the technology” altogether. Within two years, 4G will be more widely available and so there will be other ways of bringing free programming into the car, he said. A second supplier said its Mobile DTV product plans would be delayed.

Winegard has previewed at trade shows one of the few car devices for Mobile DTV with WiFi capability. The company will start selling its CIO Car Mobile DTV system to broadcasters (but not directly to consumers) this month, it said. The CIO system is basically a car tablet that can connect to the Internet via WiFi. It has a built in DVD player and iPod connectivity and you can also connect a gaming system to it. There’s a built-in Internet browser. The current version does not allow for a USB Air Card."
 
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