Mobile DTV: Buy ATSC handheld TV now or wait for new standard?

TonyT

DTVUSA Member
#1
I keep reading about new standards being developed for mobile DTV and the more I read, the more I'm confused.

1. Are the current ATSC handheld DTV sets for sale a good buy at about $100? We know that a traveling car will not receive ATSC or 8VSB signals yet because it's not what ATSC was designed for. side thought - Why would they choose 8VSB then if they have to have a separate modulation for mobile signals? I'm looking for a small handheld to take with me on the road when I travel or go to ball games and I don't want to bring a gigantic 91XG antenna.

2. According to this article

The ATSC is expected to approve a standard for mobile DTV in the third or fourth quarter this year, at which time PC dongle tuners for notebook computers should become available, according to the Open Mobile Video Coalition (OMVC), a consortium of broadcasters to advance the launch of mobile DTV.
we can expect new standards to be approved by 2010? When will devices be made available?? How clear will reception really be?


I don't want to blow $100-$125 now and then have an outdated TV in a year if the mobile TVs with the new tuners can receive signals while on the move or receive signals from greater distances.
 

Tang

DTVUSA Jr. Member
#2
I think you've summed everything up accurately. The choice is yours, just remember that early adopters sometimes get burned. Mobile DTV is very popular in Japan. Not sure if it'll catch on in the states.

 

Trip

Moderator, , , Webmaster of: Rabbit Ears
Staff member
#3
The standard is already done. Stations begin deploying this year; some are already on with it. (WRAL, WPXA)

If it was me, I would wait for something with ATSC-MPH, but only if local stations are committed to it. For example, I've decided not to replace my cell phone this month, even though it's on death's door and the contract is up, in the hopes that a mobile DTV phone is launched in the next few months. Two of the local stations in my area plan to launch it later this year or early next year.

- Trip
 

TonyT

DTVUSA Member
#4
The standard is already done. Stations begin deploying this year; some are already on with it. (WRAL, WPXA)

If it was me, I would wait for something with ATSC-MPH, but only if local stations are committed to it. For example, I've decided not to replace my cell phone this month, even though it's on death's door and the contract is up, in the hopes that a mobile DTV phone is launched in the next few months. Two of the local stations in my area plan to launch it later this year or early next year.

- Trip
I'm hoping to see some new mobile products hit the market soon. I may forgo the handheld all together if I can get a phone with a DTV tuner within the next year.
 

Orrymain

, Blogger: Orry's Orations
#5
I'd wait. The technology is bound to improve over the next couple of years so unless you feel like you absolutely have to have it now, I'd let them get the kinks out and do some upgrading.
 

O-O

DTVUSA Member
#6
Never really thought about it, but this article is saying that "digital" only tuners will be cheaper without having to include a analog tuner or what they're calling a "hybrid" dual ATSC/NTSC tuner.

Recent research by In-Stat shows 2009 unit shipments of PC television tuners dropping by nearly 11 percent, but noted that ATSC mobile video deployment in the United States could create a “significant upside” for digital-only tuners.

The In-Stat report, Global PC TV Tuners – A Solid Niche in Transition covers the worldwide market for PC TV tuners.

“Opportunities for growth will be for hybrid analog/digital tuner manufacturers to increase share by lowering prices, or for new entrants to leapfrog the analog and hybrid segments by aggressively targeting the emerging digital-only segments, albeit with lower margin,” said In-Stat analyst Gerry Kaufhold. “Overall, selling PC TV tuners is going to be a tougher business going forward.”
Mobile DTV Could Spike DTV PC Tuner Sales
 

1inxs

DTVUSA Member
#7
Mobile TV is already available in certain markets. I have Verizon Wireless and they offer mobile TV. I have the LG Env Touch, but have never activated the TV viewing.
 

1inxs

DTVUSA Member
#11
Mentioning "Mobile TV" as already being available in a conversation about "Mobile DTV" is confusing to those reading, thus why I clarified.

And no, VCAST is MediaFLO: Verizon Vcast Mobile TV on your phone with FLO TV

- Trip
I agree my post could confuse some of their possibility of buying a handheld OTA DTV receiver. This probably isn't 100% relevant to ATSC handheld TV, but another mobile programming option.

I still think we're talking of something different. Here's a link showing the two technologies of Vcast and MediaFlo
V Cast Mobile TV finally comes to SF | Crave - CNET
Unlike the carrier's V Cast streaming-video service, V Cast Mobile TV uses a portion of the UHF spectrum.
Also, because the TV signal is independent of the regular CDMA or EV-DO signals, you don't need any bars to watch the programming.
 

Trip

Moderator, , , Webmaster of: Rabbit Ears
Staff member
#12
Hm, okay. I didn't realize there were two services with almost identical names. Leave it to marketing departments to come up with that sort of thing.

- Trip
 
#13
I agree my post could confuse some of their possibility of buying a handheld OTA DTV receiver. This probably isn't 100% relevant to ATSC handheld TV, but another mobile programming option.

I still think we're talking of something different. Here's a link showing the two technologies of Vcast and MediaFlo
V Cast Mobile TV finally comes to SF | Crave - CNET
How confusing! Isn't that going to render VCast streaming video useless in the future? I had VCast a few years ago (Non-ATSC) and thought it was ok, but nothing I'd recommend to anyone. Most video clips were two minutes or less. Was an interesting way to watch the news but just wasn't very efficient.

One thing these mobile dtv or mobile hdtv makers are going to have to think about is making a hideaway ear plugs or an easier way to deliver audio to the user's ears without ticking off people around them. If you're on the subway, bus, or a public area, and you want to catch some TV, you're probably not going to want the sound blaring our for everyone to hear. Just a thought.
 
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