Mobile DTV in DC!

O-O

DTVUSA Member
#2
Seventy TV stations have signed on to deliver live television broadcasts in 28 markets by the end of 2009. If consumers catch on to the idea, it may prove that the old broadcast dinosaur still has a few tricks up his sleeve.
Go OTA! :) Did you see all of those devices running in the Fox 5 video? I'm excited. :)
 

Piggie

Super Moderator
#3
One girl they took a sound bite from said "Now with digital technology it will be clearer and I can wait the news anytime I want"...

She can't get the news anytime she wants from OTA it's streaming. Also the talking head anchor eluded to them being in cell phones, which I can't see happening.
 

Aaron62

Contributor
Staff member
#4
One girl they took a sound bite from said "Now with digital technology it will be clearer and I can wait the news anytime I want"...

She can't get the news anytime she wants from OTA it's streaming. Also the talking head anchor eluded to them being in cell phones, which I can't see happening.
lol, that's what you get when the local news grabs a hold of a story. Kind of makes you wonder what else they sensationalize.

Back to the topic, DC is at the forefront of mobile dtv broadcasting right now. It's in the local newscasters best interest to get their viewers excited about the technology and its nice to see a story like this, this early in the mobile DTV ball game.
 

Thomas G

Contributor
#5
Mobile DTV devices demonstrated in Capitol Hill

Here's another article on DC, Mobile DTV. ;)

The array of new television services possible through implementation of mobile DTV was demonstrated to members of Congress and Administration officials at a special Capitol Hill event on July 28. The event also marked last month’s transition to digital-only transmission by the nation’s full power telecasters.

The Open Mobile Video Coalition (OMVC), ION Media Networks and area broadcasters previewed the launch of mobile television services and also demonstrated the latest advances in HDTV and off-air transmission of multiple services to viewers at home.
From: Mobile DTV Demonstrated on Capitol Hill
 

Trip

Moderator, , , Webmaster of: Rabbit Ears
Staff member
#7
Sinclair is only one of the biggest TV station owners in the country. At one time they owned 62 stations.

- Trip
 

Piggie

Super Moderator
#8
I watched the first video again. Where they state it fixes problems with current digital. Think about that. Not to the future of M/H but the ATSC we have. Are they admitting it's already out of date and we need upgrade so that OTA works better? I think so. A month after analog is off and bingo a few sources are admitting the problems with ATSC... hmmmm

All my stuff will be obsolete again.
 

CptlA

DTVUSA Member
#9
I watched the first video again. Where they state it fixes problems with current digital. Think about that. Not to the future of M/H but the ATSC we have. Are they admitting it's already out of date and we need upgrade so that OTA works better? I think so. A month after analog is off and bingo a few sources are admitting the problems with ATSC... hmmmm

All my stuff will be obsolete again.
Just wait until the digital radio transition. ;)
 

Aaron62

Contributor
Staff member
#11
There won't be a digital radio transition. It's up to the consumer if they want to invest in a digital receiver.

That said it was another bad choice for a standard, but that's in the HD Radio threads.
Yeah, but wasn't that what we thought when digital / hd first came out too? Or is radio completely different?
 

Piggie

Super Moderator
#12
If you thought there would be a gradual transition on TV, you read the wrong sources. There was a gradual building out of the digital TV stations that had to be complete by July 2006 (after one of the first delays). But the analog cut off date had been set for a while. I am forgetting now, but it seems the original cut off for analog was for 2005 or so and that was set from nearly the begining if not the beginning. Trip remembers these type of facts better than I.

With FM there never has been nor even proposed an analog cut off. Personally until Digital Radio (because it's dang sure not HD) becomes really HD and a LOT more robust, I hope analog isn't ever proposed to turn off.

Plus where people own a TV or so, they probably own half a dozen FM radios. One in each car, main stereo, kitchen, bedroom clock radios, etc, etc.

I think while IBOC is here to stay for a few years to come, the FM transition has not really even started.

Another good reason is power allowed. A station can only transmit 1% of it's total power as digital. For a 100KW full power, this is 1KW, which has about 2/3 to 3/4 the range of the analog signal. Which can cover a town.

But then take the myriad of 6KW LPs. That would mean they could only run 60 watts on digital covering a few square miles around them. Why bother? I am not even sure the rules if LP stations can run digital. Another Trip the FCC expert question.
 

Trip

Moderator, , , Webmaster of: Rabbit Ears
Staff member
#13
If you thought there would be a gradual transition on TV, you read the wrong sources. There was a gradual building out of the digital TV stations that had to be complete by July 2006 (after one of the first delays). But the analog cut off date had been set for a while. I am forgetting now, but it seems the original cut off for analog was for 2005 or so and that was set from nearly the begining if not the beginning. Trip remembers these type of facts better than I.
December 31, 2006, but it wasn't a real hard date, it was more a target that Congress would actually set later on.

But then take the myriad of 6KW LPs. That would mean they could only run 60 watts on digital covering a few square miles around them. Why bother? I am not even sure the rules if LP stations can run digital. Another Trip the FCC expert question.
I heard about a full-service FM station on a mountain top that was licensed for 0.2 kW analog, and they're running IBOC with 0.002 kW digital. Seriously.

- Trip
 
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