Need advice for antenna in San Diego

rzar

DTVUSA Jr. Member
#1
Hello all. I am looking for advise for a UHF antenna for my location. It will be mounted 18 feet high on the roof of my house. I already have a separate hi VHF antenna taking care of channels 8, 9 and 10 and the UHF antenna will be mounted 4 to 5 feet above that. I have about 125 to 150 feet of total coax feeding two TV's. I would like to get all channels available to me. TIA.

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Fringe Reception

Super Moderator, Chief Content Editor
Staff member
#2
:welcome: rzar

Glad to hear you have established your local high-band VHF channels and to add UHF channels to the same coax requires using a UVSJ (UHF-VHF Signal Joiner) and not a standard splitter.

You are making an assumption of where your UHF antenna 'will' be mounted, but what if the clean data streams from the transmitters are two feet higher?

I'd try a 4-bay UHF antenna if the south stations are enough --- OR --- how about a 2-Bay shoved up another ten feet? You might capture EVERY UHF station (SW and SE) on your antenna report.

I am an experimenter / Imagineer, so I look for opportunities.

Jim
 
#3
So, it appears you're going to struggle somewhat with directionality, if you get a directional antenna. Your TV stations are in basically three directions, but separated by almost 80 degrees. Directional antennas are usually good to about 40 degrees. You already appear to be experiencing this with your VHF antenna, since you're getting channels 8, 9, and 10, but not 7, which is only slightly weaker (and direct LOS) than 9.

Fringe clued me in to some bow-tie style antennas that can fold along their axis, so you basically have one antenna pointing in two directions. You can place this on your mast and then play with the height and specific direction until you're picking up what you want. Here's an example. That's not an endorsement of this model.

I haven't tested this out for myself yet, so don't take my word for it, but that's the major issue I see with picking up TV in your location.

Another question: Are you combining the signal from the two antennas or will you just switch from one to the other? The switch will work better overall, allowing you to have UHF-only or VHF-only data streams, but you may have to manually program in your channels on one bad or the other. A signal combiner may be problematic, but I know some here have made them work.
 

rzar

DTVUSA Jr. Member
#4
I plan on combining the two antennas with a RCA TVPRAMP1R amp to keep things clean and simple. The reason I am using 18 feet as a baseline for my UHF antenna because it would be 4 feet above the VHF antenna. I could go up higher but it would require me to change the antenna J-mount I am using now, which I am not against, but size and weight are a concern. I actually would love to get stations north of me but I think it would require more than I am willing to put on my roof. Most of those channels are 2 edge and 100 miles away. I was considering a 4 bay bowtie but I was unsure.

I forgot I also get 12.1. Not concerned about channel 7 as it is a duplicate of a UHF channel.
 
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#5
I forgot I also get 12.1. Not concerned about channel 7 as it is a duplicate of a UHF channel.
It makes sense you'd get channel 12, but 12.1 is actually UHF 32. Whether it's 12.1 or 12, it's all within that 40-degree arc where highly directional antennas work best if you're also picking up 8, 9, and 10. With directionality, you may struggle to pick up both KSKT-CD 43 and also XHJK-DT 28, for example. I'm not certain how much Mexican TV you prefer to watch, but if that's an issue for you it's possible to blind yourself to some stations depending on the antenna you pick.

Good luck! Again, I'm curious to see how far and what edge patterns you pick up with your eventual pick!
 

Fringe Reception

Super Moderator, Chief Content Editor
Staff member
#7
rzar,

Although I haven't personally tried one at my home for direct comparison, I setup a neighbor with a Channel Master HD-4221 and it works well for him. The quality of its construction is very good and it has 'some' capability to receive low-band VHF.

Jim
 

rzar

DTVUSA Jr. Member
#10
Well everything is up and running. Ended up using a Clearstream 2 instead of the HBD4X because it is much lighter on my mast and not as much as a sail when it gets windy. It's getting just about everything including the Mexican stations. Some of the low power stations it just cant pull but I am happy with 39 watchable channels. Amazing this little antenna the size of a shoe box is getting 49.1 and 49.2 60 miles away.
 
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