Need more strength

Fringe Reception

Super Moderator, Chief Content Editor
Staff member
#2
:welcome: Sparky

Channel 15.1 is 'real channel 3' and your antenna is not designed to receive low-band VHF signals. Even if you were using a low-band antenna it is unlikely you could receive it because the signal is 2-edge. A low-band antenna would be the size of a pickup truck.

Channel 24.1 is UHF channel 24 which your antenna is designed to be able to receive. Has your TV tuner detected that channel? If yes, you do not need to perform a 'scan for channels' ... if it has not received that channel before, you must find the signal (read below) and perform a scan for your tuner to 'know' it is there and log it into its memory.

Since you are receiving other stations from your west, try moving you antenna a few feet up / down / right / left and it may come in. Per above, until your tuner 'knows' the signal is there, you must rescan your tuner every time you move your antenna.

Please keep us posted,

Jim and the DTVUSA Staff
 
#3
In addition to scanning, many televisions allow you to direct-tune the RF channel of the station you're looking to receive. In this case, you could try to punch "2-4" into your remote and see if the tuner can parse a signal. Sometimes there's enough to get a picture, but not for the scan to pick up the station.
 

Jim5506

DTVUSA Member
#4
Your antenna does not receive 15.1 because it is in real channel 3, but the signal is strong enough you should be able to get it with an antenna designed to receive it.

Assuming you are pointed west to get the other channels, you probably are not receiving channel 24 because it is almost 90 degrees off azimuth.

If you want to get 15.1 you'll need an all channel antenna such as the Channel Master CM3016 ($69 - but it might not be strong enough for all your UHF's) or a Channel Master CM3020 ($120) or similar antenna.
 
G

Guest

Guest
#5
I bought the antenna I have without much research, and honestly I figure I'm lucky it works as well as it does. I've tweaked it as much as I can, and rescaned. I've not found 15 or 24. I'm fine with buying a new antenna, as my current loses signal in almost any kind of weather. I would prefer an improvement in the channels I have now as well... At this point Im hoping to choose the right antenna next, even if I go a little overkill.

Would either of the channelmasters fit that bill?
 
#6
Another question, it seems that with 24 being so far away from the others it'll be impossible to grab. If I purchased a new antenna to increase signal, and receive 15, could I use the old antenna in a different direction to try and get 24?
 
#8
You probably don't want to combine two different antennas that are both receiving UHF channels on the same cable, which is what you're describing. It's likely that you'd get a lot of interference on your stations, which will disrupt the signal and ruin the picture.

You could try two things:

First, you can mount your antenna on a rotor, which will spin the antenna in the direction of channel 24 when you want to view it.

Alternately, you can mount a second antenna, as you suggested, and use a switch to cycle between the two antennas. That requires you to have either A) a remove switch that you can activate from your living room, or B) two cable runs to each TV and a switch in each room. Option A forces every TV onto the same antenna. Option B costs a lot more due to the multiple cable runs and switch boxes.
 

dkreichen1968

Moderator
Staff member
#9
You probably don't want to combine two different antennas that are both receiving UHF channels on the same cable, which is what you're describing. It's likely that you'd get a lot of interference on your stations, which will disrupt the signal and ruin the picture.
I've successfully done this on multiple occasions. The main issue is that you lose 3.5 to 4.0 dB of gain if you use a normal splitter since signals picked up on one antenna are re-emitted by the other antenna. I've even combined unlike antennas and improved my reception.
 

Similar threads

Top