New Channels

Orrymain

, Blogger: Orry's Orations
#1
I'm just curious -- for those with Comcast, when's the last time Comcast added a new channel in your area that was not a foreign language or package where you had to pay addition?

I think since they've come back here 10 years ago, they've added maybe four. The last two were Soapnet and Oxygen, and that was about three years ago. They never add anything here.
 

bicker

DTVUSA Member
#2
What channels are you looking for them to add?

I haven't seen any new channels introduced in the last few years that I would want to watch.
 

SWHouston

Moderator
Staff member
#3
Orry,

I think you're right about only 3-4 actually being added to the lineups.

What Comcast is more likely to do is...
They have that "counter" in their Box. The one which says "tune in ?? immediately", and it keeps tabs on which channels you watch most.

That way they can move that channel up to the next more costly Package, and screw you out of a few more bucks.

But, I really don't want to get into what a lousy POS I think Comcast is, not today anyway.

Have a good Day :)
S..W.
 

bicker

DTVUSA Member
#4
Market economics is actually a lot more sophisticated than that. You need to factor in the extent to which combinations of channels will drive how many consumers to make or not make specific tier selections. A very popular channel will probably not be pushed up to a higher tier of service, because having it on the lower tier of service will often drive more customers to select your service rather than doing without it. By the same token, a less popular channel is likely to be driven to a higher tier of service, if it fosters a strong but small fan-base, willing to pay for a higher tier even just to get that one channel. (I was in that category, vis a vis BBC America, for a while.)

The orphan in that is the less popular channel, without a strong fan-base. Conceptually, there are arguments to be made that such channels shouldn't even be carried, but putting those aside, such channels could be useful on a higher tier because they can drive a higher perceived value for that higher tier. Generally, the tier I'm referring to (called Digital Classic, at Comcast) is made up of channels that aren't really going to, together, appeal to anyone, but rather, as I alluded to above, have one or two channels that a subscriber might want a lot. Charging $15 per month, effectively, for one or two channels is pretty tough for a lot of folks to swallow, but the more channels that are thrown onto that tier -- channels that don't really justify themselves on the lower tier and really aren't the focus of any strong fan-base -- well the more channels the more some people are likely to accept the $15 per month, figuring that they'll get some more value out of the tier than just their favorites that are there. For me, I watched a lot of Science Channel programming, along with BBC America, when I had Digital Classic.

However, all of that is really just part of the story. The content providers, themselves, have a lot of say in whether they're willing to offer their channel for carriage on any specific tier.
 
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