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weames

DTVUSA Rookie
#1
I would appreciate some direction on the best way to go to get good reception and as many channels as can be easily accessed. Would a basic indoor or diy antenna be enough or would a rooftop or attic antenna work better. Thanks.


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Fringe Reception

Super Moderator, Chief Content Editor
Staff member
#2
:welcome: weames,

You have a very favorable TVFOOL report, especially considering it was determined at 5 feet above the ground. Have you tried using an indoor set-top antenna? If so, which channels can you currently receive?

Jim
 

weames

DTVUSA Rookie
#3
I haven't tried anything yet. I thought I would need more since we are 46 miles from the transmitter but I think it helps that we are up on a hill overlooking the valley. I will try a simple indoor one and see how it goes. Thanks.
 

dave73

DTVUSA Member
#4
I would recommend an outdoor antenna if at all possible. Since you are in a UHF only market, either a 4 or 8 bay antenna (either DIY, or one bought), or a UHF yagi like the Antennacraft MXU47 or Winegard HD9032 on the low end, or from Antennas Direct, the 42XG or 43XG. Unless you speak Spanish, & watch KUTH-DT, then aim the antenna in the 316° direction. If you speak Spanish, & watch KUTH-DT, then aim the antenna between 291° & 316°, with a stronger leaning toward 316° for everything else. I don't know if K43JV is on the air in digital or not. That's in the same direction as KUTH-DT, & owned by a religious bradcaster. So if KUTH-DT & K43JV aren't important at all, then just point the antenna at 316°. You don't find many TV Fool reports with the bulk of the stations in 1 direction. I wish I didn't have 1 station south of me, requiring a second antenna, just to keep it from going in and out. All my other stations are in the 330° - 332° directions (my antennas aimed at 330°, since all, but 2 full power stations, & 1 Class A digital station broadcast from the Sears Tower, & locals still call it that).
 

Fringe Reception

Super Moderator, Chief Content Editor
Staff member
#5
Dave,

My concern with using a 4-bay or especially an 8-bay on his roof is potential adjacent co-channel conflicts. The analog channels on the bottom of his TVFOOL report might be received strongly enough to 'splatter' into an adjacent digital channel and confuse his tuner. I think a lower-gain antenna such as a 2-bay would make that possibility less likely.

Unlike analog TV signals, digital signals do not need to be particularly strong to be received and deciphered, but they must be clean signals.

Jim
 

weames

DTVUSA Rookie
#6
Thanks for the info. I'm not worried about the Spanish channel so I would just aim it at the 316 deg. I was considering placing it in our garage for a couple reasons. One because it is adjacent to the main tv room and would be easier access than the roof or attic. Also we get very high winds occasionally as we live near the mouth of a canyon and from the garage only the garage door would separate it from a direct line towards the broadcaster. Would metal from the garage door cause much interference? It would be mounted near the ceiling at the back of the garage about 20 ft from the garage door. I was thinking of trying the diy 4 bay as it looks very simple to make (could do a 2 bay instead). I had also been looking at the winegard hd9032 suggested and thought maybe I could just hang it upside down from the garage ceiling?? Any thoughts?
 

Fringe Reception

Super Moderator, Chief Content Editor
Staff member
#7
weames,

Any metalic object might or might not be a problem. It depends if TV signals reflect off of them and if bounced signals 'compete' with the directly received signals your antenna captures. This cannot be predicted.

If you have foil-backed insulation, a water heater and piping in your garage or a perhaps a car or two ... they very likely will all affect your reception. If you have to aim your antenna at (thru) a metal garage door ... good luck. Odds are it will block direct signals and if you are lucky, you might capture a bounced/reflected signal off of your dish washer.

Outdoor antennas are almost always best, but if you have a metalic roof the odds are you need to be ten feet or more above it so it doesn't interact with your antenna. In your location I'd try a Antennas Direct DB2 UHF HDTV Antenna (DB2) from Solid Signal or something similar mounted on your chimney. It doubt it needs to be mounted very high.

Jim
 

weames

DTVUSA Rookie
#8
I guess the garage isn't such a great option with all the metal. I don't have a chimney so I would have to mount it to the shingled roof or eave. There is a PVC vent that I could mount it to but not sure if that would be strong enough. Thanks again for all the helpful info.
 

Fringe Reception

Super Moderator, Chief Content Editor
Staff member
#9
weames,

Do not mount your antenna to any plumbing vent pipes. I guarantee it will eventually make your roof leak and being plastic, they are capable of supporting nothing. Your electrical service entry pipe is off-limits as well because it is illegal to attach anything to it, per National Building/Electrical Codes.

You can buy wall brackets or tripod antenna mast mounts at your local Radio Shack, from Solid Signal and many other retailers. I prefer wall brackets because they do not penetrate roofs, which may cause leaks.

Jim
 
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