Question: old dish on house/ indoor antenna

Yank30265

DTVUSA Jr. Member
#1
i wanna buy this indoor antenna thats like 80 bucks I heard i could screw it into the dish thats on my house since i moved in; there is no dish service or box just the dish and the coax cable; if i buy the indoor antenna can i screw it into the dish / will it work better? i live in a hole at the bottom of a subdivision and my scanner doesnt even pick up radio frequencies; so before i cancel my cable and buy an antenna because i "heard" i could screw it into the coax cable on the dish i was wondering if and how it could be done?
 
#4
I see that the TV fool report was done for 5 feet above the ground. Is that as high as you will be able to mount an antenna? The report as is shows one station strong enough to receive with a small antenna, or possibly indoors. To receive all major networks is likely to require a larger out door high VHF/UHF antenna. Run the tv fool report at 10, or 15 feet let's see if it changes.
 

MrPogi

Moderator, , Webmaster of Cache Free TV
Staff member
#5
I think if you get a decent UHF/VHF antenna and point to the North East (about 38 degrees) you should get the major networks - but PBS (7 or 8) may be a problem. It will require a large outdoor antenna.

As steve suggested, run your report again, as high as you are able to mount an antenna. And do not buy an indoor antenna for outdoor use, you would be wasting your money. One problem with satellite mounting is they are set to provide a clear view of the southern sky, and you need a clear view of the NE horizon.
 
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Yank30265

DTVUSA Jr. Member
#6
TV Fool
this is at 15 ft; im at the bottom of a subdivision so im not sure what altitude im at even if i bolt an antenna to my chimney it will be higher but im not sure if it is higher than ground level. know what i mean? google says my house is 871 ft elevation; im not sure if thats accurate but thats y im here
 
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#7
The TV fool report at 15 feet looks much better. As MrPogi suggested PBS might be your most difficult signal to receive. On the compact low cost side I would suggest the Stellar Labs 30-2440.
Stellar Labs VHF/UHF HDTV 60 Mile Fringe Yagi Antenna | 30-2440 (302440) | Stellar Labs
If PBS is important ( it's a priority for me ) I'd suggest one of the large Antennacraft or Winegard dual band antennas.
AntennaCraft UHF/High-Band VHF Outdoor HDTV Antenna (HBU55) from Solid Signal
Winegard Platinum Series VHF/UHF HDTV Antenna(HD7698P) from Solid Signal
Point it north east. Higher is normally better. Near by trees and buildings can block signals. I was not about to make an antenna suggestions based on a TV fool report at 5 feet.
Steve
 

MrPogi

Moderator, , Webmaster of Cache Free TV
Staff member
#8
TV Fool
this is at 15 ft; im at the bottom of a subdivision so im not sure what altitude im at even if i bolt an antenna to my chimney it will be higher but im not sure if it is higher than ground level. know what i mean? google says my house is 871 ft elevation; im not sure if thats accurate but thats y im here
The TVfool terrain database knows your elevation. What it's asking for is the height above ground. That is the distance between the ground and the antenna. Try again at the height where you would install on the roof. If you manage to pull PBS 21 out of the red zone, you could probably use the smaller (and less expensive) Antennacraft HBU-44 or the Stellar Labs 30-2440. Both the Antennacraft HBU- antennas are available from Radio Shack.
 
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dkreichen1968

Moderator
Staff member
#9
Just because a signal shows up as red on the TVfool report doesn't mean that it isn't relatively easy to pick up. 11dB Noise Margin isn't all that bad. It really comes down to what is really between you and the towers. In many cases TVfool is conservative. Often you don't know until you try.
 

Yank30265

DTVUSA Jr. Member
#10
if tvfool knows my elevation then i could mount this thinto the peak of my ranch house or get it up on top of the chimney; ill have to check the height tomorrowill retry at 25 ft
and reply
ty again
 
#12
That looks quite a bit better. TV fool is the best signal prediction tool we have, but you really won't know until you try. Take time to learn a bit.
You are getting good advice here we don't all agree completely on everything, but we are all trying to offer good advice.
 

Yank30265

DTVUSA Jr. Member
#13
when these antenna description say they pick up ch 2-7 or 7- 69; what does that mean? will i still be able to get my hd channels like discovery; history; A&E; espn; i am really antennae stupid and thank yuz for any and all the info youre giving me; but i think if i can get the same channels through an antennae then y give cable 150 bucks? when i can lose the cable and just pay for my internet?
thank you all again
 
#14
No you will not receive cable programming with an antenna. You will receive the major broadcast networks ABC, NBC, CBS, Fox, CW, PBS, and the sub-channels available in your area. Perhaps there is some one else who can explain it better then I can. You can use a Roku and your internet connection to fill in the rest of your television watching needs. The selection of programing available on line using a roku is huge a lot of it is free. I use a Roku with a Hulu plus subscription, and don't see the need for anything more. Those who are more into movies prefer Netflix over Hulu. A Hulu plus subscription is $7.99 a month.
https://www.roku.com/what-is-roku
Your much lower cost programing package using an antenna and internet streaming is not the same as what cable offers it is different, and in my opinion much better.
 

MrPogi

Moderator, , Webmaster of Cache Free TV
Staff member
#15
when these antenna description say they pick up ch 2-7 or 7- 69; what does that mean? will i still be able to get my hd channels like discovery; history; A&E; espn; i am really antennae stupid and thank yuz for any and all the info youre giving me; but i think if i can get the same channels through an antennae then y give cable 150 bucks? when i can lose the cable and just pay for my internet?
thank you all again
Your TV fool looks decent. You could put a Stellar Labs VHF/UHF HDTV| 30-2440 on the roof and aim at 40 degrees (a few degrees North of NE). This will get you all the major broacast networks. If you can, however, I would go with an Antennacraft HBU-44 or HBU-55. You'll get more stable reception, and get some of the weaker stations. Here's a list of all the Atlanta GA TV channels: Stations for Atlanta, Georgia You'll get most of them, and many are HD. A lot are audio only channels, shopping, religious, and foreign language channels, but about 30 have worthwhile programming that you may like. And they're all free!

But you're not going to get cable channels like discovery; history; A&E or ESPN. HULU will help you watch a lot of the show on those cable networks, but they will be delayed. There's some "live" channels on Roku, but not many, and pay TV networks will make you have a cable subscription to watch them (Really stupid, huh?)
 

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