Old TV

1inxs

DTVUSA Member
#3
I need to know if my TV, that has a rotary channel selector, can be converted to the new digital transition?
Any TV can use a DTV converter. If you don't have the connector as shown in Jay's post you will need a 75 ohm balun, also known as a 300 ohm to 75 ohm matching transformer. They run around $3.00.
photo from wee-haggis photobucket
 

Aleta

DTVUSA Rookie
#4
Old tv

Thanks for your reply, Jay. I went down to look at the TV again, and I did not locate that logo picture that you printed. My TV is about 8 to 10 years old, and as I said it has a rotary dial system. I could not look at the back right now, because it sits in a cabinet. It has a great picture, with rabbit ears for an antenna. I appreciate you taking the time to respond, and when I have more time, I will pull the set out, and look for that logo on the back. Thanks again, I can't get any answers on this situation.
 

Aleta

DTVUSA Rookie
#5
Old tv

I am so grateful. You have given me the answer, and a picture and number of the adaptor. Thanks so much. I finally have received a great solution to my problem. Thanks so much for responding, both of you!! You guys are awesome!!!
 

Jason Fritz

Administrator
Staff member
#6
I am so grateful. You have given me the answer, and a picture and number of the adaptor. Thanks so much. I finally have received a great solution to my problem. Thanks so much for responding, both of you!! You guys are awesome!!!
Really?? Well, you're welcome and thanks for taking the time to update us too.
 

bicker

DTVUSA Member
#7
Incidentally, there are some televisions produced (I think) in the 1980s that cannot be readily converted. They have a single external screw to attach an antenna (instead of the coax port that Jay posted a photo of, or two external screws, that would take the adapter that 1inxs posted a photo of). I never understood how they worked in the first place. As far as I know, there were only a few of them, and they were specifically space-savers, i.e., those that mounted to the bottom of kitchen cabinets.

Anyway, with that very very minor exception, pretty much any television can be made to accept a converter.
 

Aaron62

Contributor
Staff member
#8
Incidentally, there are some televisions produced (I think) in the 1980s that cannot be readily converted. They have a single external screw to attach an antenna (instead of the coax port that Jay posted a photo of, or two external screws, that would take the adapter that 1inxs posted a photo of). I never understood how they worked in the first place. As far as I know, there were only a few of them, and they were specifically space-savers, i.e., those that mounted to the bottom of kitchen cabinets.

Anyway, with that very very minor exception, pretty much any television can be made to accept a converter.
yeah, those and those pesky hand held tvs without a input on them too. Surprised that no one has tinkered with those type of TVs to see how much it would take to outfit one with a RF/coax connector. Too much work involved I guess.
 
#9
the b&w camping tv's CAN be converted. All you need is that little adapter that you put in the back of it. These usually come with them when you buy one. You can get them at radioshack.





Then just hook the box up the same way you would on a regular television. Easy!

Tune in to channel 3 or 4 depending on what the box is set to.
 
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